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June 21, 1960 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-06-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sweep Through 'U' Steam Tunnels

Defines Problems
In English Teaching

TAX PLAN:
Committee Considers New Proposal

y MICHAEL BURNS
In the University's steam
June 2 caused a great deal
nage, ranging from 1,800
ne to eight rare fish.
Hugh the University has not
eased any figures on the
es, Nicholas J. Prakken,
nanager of Michigan Bell
one Co., said that it cost his
ay about $20,000 to repair
rned-out telephone cables
ake other repairs.
University's report is ex-
in two weeks, Plant Super-
nt Alfred Ueker said.

Two firemen became Ill from
the smoke, Assistant Fire Chief
Arthur Stauch and Fireman Duane
Luick, but were released after
treatment at University Hospital.
The fish, guppy-sized Mexican
specimens used for doctoral thesis
work, died when smoke from the
fire got into the University Natu-
ral Science Museum's air com-
pressor system and was, sent
through the aerating systems of
the aquaria. Prompt action in
shutting off the systems prevented
further losses.
The fire started at 3:30 p.m. in

I

NIGH ADVENTURE ON
THE MoGTY MISSISSIPPI
Mark Twaic's romantic rogues come to
thrilling life on the big CinemaScope screen!
TONY RANDALL
S,.ARCHIE MOORE -1-m
r° EDDIE HODGES

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DIAL NO 5-6290

Now

k SUMMER EVENT-

a tunnel just west of the Naval
ROTC building on North Univer-
sity Ave., where University work-
mne were installing a new valve
in a steam pipe.
A spark from the acetylene
torch they were using set fire
to insulation material wrapped
around the pipe. The blaze was
rapidly spread by the ventilator
fans used to keep air circulating
in the tunnels, causing workmen
to flee.
The fire was hard to fight, Fire
Chief Ernest Heller said, because
of the web-like arrangement of
the tunnels running between the
ROTC building, the Museum, East
Medical Bldg., Waterman Gym.
and the Dentistry Building. The
tunnels are 20 feet below the
ground and are large enough for
a man to walk upright in them.
Heller said the fire spread
through the passages, burning the
old insulating "like piles of wet
leaves." The overhead lights in
the tunnels went out when the
power lines burned, and firemen
wree forced to crawl on their
hands and knees to avoid the
thick smoke and steam.
The exposed steam pipes posed
further dangers, as officials feared
they would burst with-the in-
creased pressure created by the
fire's heat.
Plan Series
Of Lectures
On,1.Russia
The Committee on the Program
in Russian Studies has slated six
speakers who will discuss aspects
of the Soviet Union at the Univer-
sity this summer.
Prof. Vera S. Dunham of Wayne
State University will speak on
"The New Idealist in Soviet Liter-
ature at 4:10 p.m. Thursday in
Auditorium A, Angell Hall.
"Russian Music since World War
II" will be the subject of an ad-
dress by University Prof. Louise
E. Cuyler June 30. July 14, Prof.
Hugh McLean of the University of
Chicago will speak on "Zosh-
chenko and the Soviet Con-
science."
The Rand Corporation will send
Hans Heymann here Aug. 4 to
discuss "The USSR in the Techno-
logical Race." Prof. Merle Fansod
of Harvard University will ex-
amine "Political Changes Since
the Death of Stalin" on Aug. 4.
The concluding lecture, Aug. 9,
will be "Intellectual Opposition in
the Soviet Union" by Prof. Alex-
ander V. Riasanovsky of the Uni-

VERSATION with PUNCH

TUESDAY.,
7:30 P.M.

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By BEATRICE TEODORO y
"Too often problems in teaching1
English are defined in teachers'
grievances," Dr. Harold C. Martin,1
Director of General Education at
Harvard University said in his dis-
cussion of "English Teaching:1
Problems and Prospects."
The educators complain of the1
pay, crowded classrooms and heavy
teaching load. However, they must
redefine the problem in terms of1
other roles, Martin said.
The teacher can regard the stu-
dent as a commodity which he is
readying for market; the better,
job he does now, the better price
his product will command in the
future.
'Market' for Students
The market is made up of uni-
versity faculties, civil service em-,
ployers, newspapers, and other em-
ployers who require the services of
the written word, Martin con-j
tinued.
Unfortunately, these consumers,
have been complaining about the
quality of the product. Polls of
newspapers and civil service em-
ployers found employees lacking in
basic spelling and grammatical
skills and organization of thought
in their writing.
Martin also cited a New York
educator who was commenting on
the state of high school graduates
and said, "Either they don't write
in. high school or they do it som-
nambulistically and awake with
no memory of the act."
Goals Listed
To cope with these complaints
which are "justly being made,"
Martin suggested that English
educators set two goals for them-
selves: first, to give all students
an adequate grasp of the language,
and also to direct more capable
students beyond "adequacy" to
"power and elegance."
Under his classification of "ade-
quate" Martin included the ability
to spell correctly all words the
student commonly uses, the com-
pulsion to look up and learn the
words of which the student is un-
sure, the knowledge of more words
than he normally uses, and the7
ability to write so that he is easily
understood.
If the student wants to master
"power and elegance" he must
read adequately, be able to sum-
marize his reading and relate it
to other fieleds, and be able to
"like and dislike" particular lit-
erary selections "as easily as he
likes or dislikes particular movies."
There are three factors clouding
Picket Lines
To Continue
Four local stores were picketed
Saturday by 20 to 25 people,
mostly University students, for an
hour and a half in the after-
noon.
The demonstration was a con-
tinuation of a protest begun last
semester against the Cousins
Shop, charged in a letter to the
Ann Arbor Human Relations Com-
mission of - refusing to serve a
Negro woman, and three local out-
lets of national chain stores, F.
W. Woolworth and S. S. Kresge
alleged to practice discrimination
in the South.
The group hopes to increase to
50 or 75, in order to lengthen the
time for picketing to four hours
every Saturday, Jack Ladinsky,
Grad., said.
"It is also considering moving
into othe rareas," he went on,"
"such as visiting roller rinks and
beaches to ascertain whether any
discrimination exists there." If so,
the group might publish evidence
of such policies and set up stand-
in lines to assert its protest.
"The group is working in close
cooperation with the NAACP and

with HOME, an agency of the
local Council of Churches dealing
with problems in housing discrim-
ination," Ladinsky said.'
The group and its streering com-
mittee each met one a week. Steer-
ing committee meetings are at-
tended by representatives of other
organizations concerned with ra-
cial discrimination.
Ladinsky said the group hopes
to sustain communication with
the Southern movement and sym-
pathy with the sit-ins. It may also
develop a newsletter those active
during the regular school year in
touch with its acivities.

the prospect of achieving these
goals, Martin said: bad teaching
conditions, confusion and incom-
petence. Most teaching organiza-
tions have held the view that if
the bad conditions were eliminated,
the other two would automatically
disappear. In fact, Martin main-
tained, the solution might be the
reverse. If confusion and incom-
petence were to -disappear from
the teaching profession, the con-
ditions would improve.
Confusion could' be eliminated
by defining what skills come under
"English" and by streamlining the
English teachers' duties. Incom-
petence could be removed by ex-
panding the means by which work-
ing teachers could continue train-
ing, and by emephasizing the pro-
ductivity and creativity of English
educators. At present, Martin said,
English teachers "read little, write
less."
There is a saying, Martin added,
"Every teacher is an English
teacher." Even though everyone
must recognize that students learn

I versity of Pennsylvania.

-1

PROF, HARVEY BRAZER
.. . present tax plan

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DR. HAROLD C. MARTIN
'. ..lectures on teaching
language from all their teachers,
he concluded, the English teach-
ers must also fulfill their local re-
sponsibility.
First in Series
Martin's was the first in the
series of six discussions on "Prob-
lems in the Teaching of High
School English," sponsored by the
English department and the tenth
annual Conference Series for Eng-
lish Teachers.
Every Monday for the next five
weeks, meetings will be held at 4
p.m. in Aud. C.
Scheduled speakers are Lee
Deighton, Director of Education
of the Macmillan Company; Ruth
Chamberlin from Waterford
Township High School; Oscar
Haugh, Director of the Teacher
Training Program in the Language
Arts at the University of Kansas;
Robert C. Pooley, chairman of the
Liberal Studies department of the
University of Wisconsin; and Ro-
bert Freier, chairman of the Eng-
lish department at Osborn High
School.
'U' Building
Br0en Into
During Finals
City police are still investigat-
ing a breaking and entering into
the Economics Bldg. which oc-
curred on the morning of June 1.
The entry was made at ap-
proximately 2:30 a.m. through a
basement window, a night watch-
man reported. The illegal en-
trants broke a pane of glass and
in doing so apparently cut them-
selves because blood stains were
found.
From there the culprits went
to Prof. William Palmer's office
on the second floor, where they
attempted to gain entrance by
breaking the lock and the door
hinges and finally succeeded by
breaking the window glass.
Nothing was taken from the
office, however, and no other
damage was done to the building.
This was the morning of the
Economics 51 final examination,
in which Prof. Palmer was the
lecturer. Thus police suspect that
the entrants were students at-
tempting to obtain a copy of the
examination.

A new tax plan for Michigan,
was submitted May 2 to the Citi-1
zens for Michigan committee on;
taxation by Prof. Harvey Brazer;
of the economics department and
research associate with the In-
stitute of Public Administratoin.
The plan features a three perI
cent corporate income tax and a'
three per cent individual income
tax with a $600exemption.
It also provides for a possible 1
corporate income tax of up to oneo
percent to be enacted by indivi-j
dual municipalities and collected
by the state as well as the same
arrangement for an individul in-
come tax, also of one per cent or<
less.
At the present level of eco-
nomic activity, Prof. Brazer esti-
mates a revenue of $225 million
from the individual tax and $70
million from the other, based on
assumed collections over a full
12-month period, 1961-62.
The total possible revenue if
all cities and villages levy both
one per cent income taxes would
probably be about $71 million-
$16 million from the corporate
tax and $55 million from the
other, Prof. Brazer estimated.
The tax plan also includes an
optional one per cent sales and
use tax to be levied by the coun-
ties. Given the previously stated
conditions, Prof. Brazer thinks
the likely revenue from this tax
would be $126 million, $84 million
(two-thirds) of which would be
distributed to the school districts,
and the other third to the coun-
ties.
In his report, Prof. Brazer
pointed out that full implementa-
tion of the plan would require
voter approval of the four per-
cent sales tax amendment to be
voted on November 6, because
failure to sanction a higher sales
tax on the state level would
automatically deny such power
to the counties.
Prof. Brazer also proposes
abolishing the intangibles and
corporate franchise taxes, except
for a two mills minimum fran-
chise tax to be paid only by cor-
porations with very low earnings
or losses.
With the abolishion of these
taxes the state would lose a total
of $78 million; local revenue
would decrease by nine million.
Finally, Prof. Brazer suggested
that personal property, other
than inventories, be exempt from
the local properties tax; and that
the Business Activities Tax (BAT)
be reduced to six and a half mills,
dropping deductions for rent, in-
terest, and depreciation on real
property.
The changes in the BAT would
raise about $5 million for the
state. The personel properties tax
exemptions would cost local gov-
ernments $140 million, which
would be returned to them by the
state.
Prof. Brazer's report said
the State's adverse position
--
r

with respect to taxation of busi-
ness, as compared with neighbor-
ing states, is due in very large
part to the local tax on machin-
ery, equipment, and other tangi-
bles . . , [their] exemption would
appreciably reduce the cost of
using industrial capital goods in
Michigan and would remove a
chronic source of sometimes
highly Justified complaint on the
part of Michigan businessmen."
Regarding the proposed tax
changes Prof. Brazer said, "in-
come taxes provide sufficient rev-
enue to permit a substantial re-
duction in those business taxes
which are least equitable and
most objectionable in terms of
their unneutrality and arbitrary,,
uncertain bases;" and "intro-
duce into the tax structure, which
is currently so heavily weighted
with regressive taxes on some
portions of consumer expendi-
tures, an important element of
progression, despite the absence
of gradation in tax rates."
Assuming complete adoption of
the plan and an accurate esti-
mate of revenue gains and loses,
the total gain for Stte, municipal
and county governments and the
schools would be $74 million, ex-
cluding the optional one per cent
sales and income taxes, which, if
levied by the counties and mu-
nicipal governments, would pro-
vide an estimated $195 million
more,
Prof. Brazer estimates that the
total revenue to the state Gen-
eral Fund will increase from $409
million in fiscal 1960-61 to $460
in 1961-62, and to $500 for fiscal
'62-63.
He also calls the corporate in-
come tax a "necessary comple-
ENDING TONIGHT,*
#6Good and
true,. so
thoroughly
Fdrench!'9
-Winston,, N. Y. Post
FERNANDEL
FORBIDDEN FRUIT"
Also
"OF LOVE AND LUST"

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mom-IN-1r0~at 1m. mulli
RICHARD riARRY 8TVU/ LE w
1N N I THURSDAY

I

ment to the individual nice
taxe," and also, preferable tc
franchise tax. The minim
franchise tax, as an alternal
to a corporate income tax wl
pre-income yield is less than
per cent, is retanied "in def
ence to popular opinion that
corporations should pay some
to the state."
The Business Activities '
with the suggested adjustme
"could represent a tax wh
asked of businesses that t
contribute to the income of ca
tal and labor . ,,"
Although the report recd
mends abolition of the intan
bles tax, it suggests that the
come tax rate applicable to ba
and Intangible income realized
individuals should be raised
four or five per cent, if an
tangibles tax is felt necessary.
Prof. Brazer, who has soi
times supported a graduated
come tax rate, suggested a
rate this time "becuse of its si
plicity," adding that graduat.
at the state level "must be v
limited--because of complexi
and emotional opposition."

-1

DIAL NO 2-6264
TNE Wo*E...TM
Tie MAWNESS
OF LOVE

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...
A

Wednesday
ALEC GUINNESS
in
"THE SCAPEGOAT"
and "THE SWAN"

"Greatest Show
On Earth"

1

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