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July 27, 1960 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-27

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"1960

nxrHt MICEIGAN DAILY

19S0 THE MICE~GAN DAILY

ACROS S CAMPUS:
Rackham Galleries Show Local, Art

Teachers Should Question
Over-Tolerance of Pupils

Award-winning works by 133
Michigan artists went on display
thisweek at the University's Rack-.
ham Galleries.
The annual Regional Invitation-
. .

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E MAGAZINE
1

al Art Exhibition, continuing
through Aug. 3, includes work
which has been awarded recogni-
tion in local and regional art
shows during the past year. It is
sponsored by the Extension Serv-
ice, Summer Sessioin, and the]
architecture college.
The galleries are open from 10
a.m. to 10 p.m. daily except Sun-
day.
* * *
Three linguists from the Uni-
versity will present papers at the
Linguistic Society of America sum-
mer meeting at the University of
Texas, July 20-30.
A joint paper on "More Bi-
uniqueness" will be presented by
Eva Silvertson, Grad., and Charles
J. Fillmore, Grad.
Prof. Peter' Ladefoged, visiting
from the University of Edinburgh,
England, will give a paper on
"Morphenic Alternate in Igbirra."
Prof. Ladefoged is lecturing in the
Summer Session linguistics pro-
gram here.
While the teacher shortage con-
tinues to be acute, student interest
in teaching as an occupation is
high at the University, according
to Dean Willard C. Olson of the
education school.
"In spite of restrictions on ex-
pansion, the teacher certificates
recommended crept up from 789 in
1957-58 to 950 the next year to
998 in 1959-60, an increase ovev
the period of 26 per cent," Olson
reports. "In the last five years
certificates have doubled."

,.n-.

RNeW by BUENA VISTA Ditibtion Ca.. ff. *Wali Dtanqy SPtodetion.
FRIDAY'
JUDY HOLLIDAY DEAN MARTIN
in "BELLS ARE RINGING"
"THE
ENDINGm LOST
A~y WORLD"
TONIGHT starts
Thursday
NO 2-6264 s y
NEVER BEFORE ON THE SCREEN.,
SEE THE WAR OF THE CHARIOTS!

val of Song" in October. Prof.
Frances Gillett of the music school:
is the fourth teacher of "Festival
of Song" in its 11-year history.
She replaces Edythe Albert who,
conducted the series for the last
six years. The first radio teacher
was Lois Anderson, who was suc-
ceeded by Janice Cobb in 1951. '
In addition to becoming ac-'
quainted with Prof. Gillett as their
new radio teacher, the children
will also become familiar with a
new song book, presently being
prepared for the coming school
year.
Halleck Hits
Big Budgeut
CONVENTION HALL, CHICA-
GO W-House Republican leader
Charles A. Halleck of Indiana
predicted last night that if the
Democrats follow through on their
platform pledges it will mean "the
biggest budget busting, deficit
spending, high cost of living pro-
gram America has ever suffered."
Provided the Democrats are
united, Halleck told the GOP Na-
tional convention, "They've got
the votes to do it" at the Congress
session resuming next month.
Flunk Platform
"But if they're not united--as
they claim to be-they'll flunk
their platform before the ink is
dry. And the country will be bet-
ter off for it," Halleck said.
Halleck, in his speech on be-
coming the convention's perma-
nent chairman, charged the Dem-
ocrats in effect with shedding
crocodile tears about the farmers
and about other problems. He
contended the opposition party
could have done something about
these problems with big Demo-
cratic majorities in both House
and Senate.
HJalleck's fusilade was aimed
beyond the Democratic-run Con-
gress, straight at Sen., John F.
Kennedy of Massachusetts, the
Democrats' presidential nominee,
and Sen. Lyndon B. Johnson of
Texas, Kennedy's running mate.
Johnson is the Senate's Demo-
cratic leader.
Knocks Ticket
He derided the Kennedy-John-
son ticket as "strictly a marriage
of convenience-it doesn't fool
anybody and it won't last."
Like other Republican orators
at this convention, the Indiana
Congressman jibed at the Demo-
crats for using a crying towel and
pushing a panic button over the
Russian threat and American
means to cope with it.

"We need to have as much
investment in how to control
children as we have in how to
understand them," a well-known
authority on enotionally malad-
justed children said recently.
Prof. William Morse of the edu-
cational psychology department
emphasized the fact that teachers
take too much from their students
and said that although the mental
health concept had been belabored
by many, there had been little real
progress.
"We're advertising it but we
don't know how to manage ,it."
"All our energy has been put
into accepting the child. If he
kicks one shin, you turn the other
shin. Then maybe you can change
him, you're told," Prof. Morse said.
Teachers have been trained to
tolerate certain types of child be-
haviors which they should not, he
explained. "This amounts to a kind
of psychic absenteeism."
This cycle of accepting the child
entails finding out about the child,
developing toleration, "then come
frustration, then it's June and we
start all over again."
Acceptance will have to change
from "naive resignation" to ac-
cepting the child "whatever his
pathology." This may mean keep-
ing him in school or removal for
special help.
"Teachers will accept him by
doing what is necessary to help
the child-and this may mean re-
stricting him," he explained.
The professor called for stricter
classroom supervision and said
that many progressive schools fos-

ter unhealthy interpersonal rela-
tionships. "In classrooms where
the teacher has: his 'eye on the
sparrow"' classmates help each
other more, he said.

DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN

r

A

CO EDS:
The summer styles
a re:

Shorter .. .
Softened . .

Sleek
Simple

Professional Hairstylists
Mendelssohn box office open 10-8 daily -Dept. of Speech No appt's needed
The Dascola Barbers
Near Michigan Theatre

(Continued from Page 2)
Academic Notices
Speech Colloquium: Dr. Martin C.
Schultz, Assistant Prof.rat Western
Reserve University and an associate of
the Cleveland Hearing and Speech
Center will talk on "Speech and Hear-
ing Research" on Wed., July 27 at 3
p.m. in the West Conference Rm.,
Rackham Bldg.
Doctoral Examination for Charlotte
Yale Ives, Education; thesis: "Percep-
tions of Prospective Elementary Teach-
ers Regarding Their Preparation in
Health Education," Wed., July 27, 4019
University High School, at 2:00 p.m.
Chairman, M. E. Rugen.
Placement Notices
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the 1960-61
school year.
Belleville, Mich.-English/Social Stu-
dies.
Fraser, Mich.-HS English.
Joliet, 111.-Jr. HS Girls Phys. Educ.,
Sch. Social Worker, Emotionally Ment.
Hdcp.
Milford, Mich.-Jr. or Sr. HS English
Grls Counselor.
Park Forest, Ill.-HS Math.
Petoskey, Mich.-Sr. HS English/
Drama, Jr. HS English.
Rochester, Mich.-Elem. (1st or 2nd).
Trenton, Mich.-HS English.
For additional information contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3528
Admin. Bldg., NO 3-1511, Ext. 489.
Rochester City School District, New
York..Opening in Research and Testing
Dept. for person trained to make popu-
lation trend studies. Teaching experi-
ence helpful.
- U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, New Or-
leans, Louisiana. Chemists, principally
organice.
YWCA, New York. Openings for Di-
rectors and all levels in various parts
of the U.S. A.B. degree, plus two yrs.
experience.
Wilson & Co., Inc. Prudential Plaza,
Chicago. Chemical Engineer, Biochem-
ist-PhD.
J. T. Baker Chemical Co. Phillips-
burg, N.J.
Flight Safety Foundation, New York.
Structures engineer. Aeronautical eng.,
plus 10 yrs, experience in aviation.
State of Connecticut. Public Health
Nursing Consultant, Sr. Institution
Dentist, Chief Tabulating Section
(IBM), Assistant Forest Ranger.
State of Michigan. Exams for Office
Manager, Psychiatric Social Work Ad-
ministrator, Highway Managing Di-
rector.
Stromberg-Carlson, Division of Gen-
eral Dynamics. Engineers, Mathemati-
cians, Scientists.
For further information contact the
Bureau of Appointments, 4021 Admin.
Bldg., Ext. 3371.
Organization
Notices
July 27, 1960
Sociedad Hispanica, Guitar & Song-
fest, 2 hour program of Spanish-Ameri-
can guitar music & songs with audience
participation, July 27, 8 p.m., 3050
Frieze Bldg, lounge.
DIAL NO 8-6416
Now Through Saturday

PROF. WILLIAM MORSE
... don't turn the shin
To Discuss
Disarmamenit
Tonight at eight in the Wesley
Lounge' of the First Methodist
Church, three members of a sum-
mer caravan for disarmament will
meet with citizens wishing to learn
more about the topic of disarma-
ment.
The Rev. Curtis Crawford, a
Unitarian minister and two col-
lege students have been touring
the Midwest this summer discuss-
ing the issues centered around this
issue.
Sponsored by various national
organizations, including the Amer-
ican Federation of Scientists, and
the National Committee for a Sane
Nuclear Policy, the group has been
attempting to present facts about
disarmament and promote dis-
cussion among political groups,
church groups and civic organiza-
tions.
Challenge Sets
'Night Meeting
Challenge will hold a meeting
at 7:30 tonight at 523 Packard,
Apt. 6, to summarize summer ac-
tion and discuss future plans.
-CAFE
PROMETH EAN
- 508 E. William --
Wed. and Thurs.-Poetry
Fri. and Sat.-Folk songs
(50c door charge)
Sunday-JAZZ-9-12 p.m.
(75c door charge)
Open daily 8 p.m. to 2 a.m.

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