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July 27, 1960 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1960-07-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE TRICHIG AN. DA INawl

-" _

r

Club Pros
Drop O
InP GA's
By DON WEISS
Associated Press Sports Writer
AKRON (P) - The bigger the
Professional Golfers Association
championship grows, and it has
pushed into the big three of Amer-
ican pro golf, the smaller it is
likely to become in interest to the
fellow it used to be designed for-
the club professional.
That seemed to be the trend
today as the nation's top players
and teachers headed for their
homes and stops in golf's continu-
ing circuit after Jay Herbert's
nerve-numbing victory in the 1960
PGA tournament.
Handful of Pros
Of the top 60 finishers in the
final standing, only a handful were
club pros.
It's been that way for three
years, now since the PGA was
changed from a match play event
on generally easy "pool tables" to
medal play on a course like this
7.165-yard, par 35-35-70 Fire-
stone Country Club monster that
played as tough as a site of the
National Open.
Only the regular members of
golf's touring group have a chance
on' courses lkie these. At the start
of last week, 90 per cent of the
touring pros claimed Firestone was
too tough for all but a few of their
number.

White

Sox, Pirates

Deep

Lea

Q

'^

Club Pros Lag

/

That Herbert wasn't one of those
mentioned as capable enough
really shouldn't matter.
What does matter is that of the
top 60 in a field that orginally
numbered 184, the best perform-
ances by club pros were 72-hole
totals of 296 by old-timer Henry
Picard of Cleveland, Shelley May-
field of Jericho, N.Y., and Bob
Harris of Winnetka, Ill.
That's an average of 74 per
round and 15 strokes off the 281
that won for Hebert and his blaz-:
ing finish of birdie-par-birdie-par
on the last four holes in Sunday's'
final round .
For a time, 46-year-old John
O'Donnell, teaching pro at a pub-
lic links course in Baltimore,
stuck close to the leaders. But he
couldn't break 80 in the last two
rounds and finished way back at
305.
Need Luck
"If you get any money anyway
from these touring players in a
medal play tournament, you just
have to be lucky," O'Donnell said
when it was all over.
Used to be that a club pro would1
sneak in now and then and grab
the PGA title. But in the three
years since it went from match
play to medal play, the champions
have been all tourists-Dow Fin-
sterwald, Bob Rosburg and now
Hebert.
Next year, the rest will be just
as tough.
The site is Olympia Fields Coun-
try Club near Chicago - a true
championship course that has been
used for many national tourna-
ments, including the PGA in 1925
and the National Open in 1928.
Rosburg, chairman of the PGA
tournament committee, said yes-
terday, "you can be sure some ac-
tion will be taken" regarding the
absence of Sammy Snead, Arnold
Palmer and Art Wall jr. from the
Annual Eastern Open golf field.
The missing golfers plan to play
exhibition golf, ignoring PGA
rules that no exhibition may be
staged within 200 miles of a major
tournament.

Pennant
Races Tight
In Maj ors
By The Associated Press
The streaking Chicago White
Sox and the stubborn Pittsburgh
Pirates retained their leads last
night in the Major Leagues' tight
pennant races.
The American League cham-
pion White Sox junked their light-
hitting tag with a 21-hit, 4-homer
attack behind Early Wynn for a.
16-3 victory at Boston. The White
Sox, who have won 22 of their last
31 games, remained one game
ahead of the come-alive New York:
Yankees who whipped Cleveland
6-1 on Mickey Mantle's 25th
homer.
First Pitcher
Vern Law became the first, pit-
cher in the majors to win 13
games this season as he stopped
St. Louis 5-4 to preserve the P1-
rates' slim National League edge
over the hot Milwaukee Braves.
The Braves, a full game back
after the Pittsburgh triumph,
were at San Francisco in a game
that was scoreless after three in-
nings.
Los Angeles and Cincinnati met
in the other West Coast night
game with the Reds ahead 3-1
after five innings.
In a day game, the Philadel-
phia Phillies rallied for a 4-3 vic-
tory over Chicago on Clay Dal-
rymple's three-run homer in the
ninth. Robin Roberts (7-9) won
it with help from reliever Dick
Farrell. Ernie Banks got his 28th
homer for the Cubs.
A's Victorious
Johnny Kucks, the ex-Yankee
pitched the Kansas City A's to a
2-1 victory at Baltimore. It was
Kucks' first complete game since
Sept. 15, 1959. The Orioles pushed,
over the winning run with two
out in the eighth on four singles,
two of the infield variety. Jerr
Lumpe's topper to second base
was the payoff hit,
Mantle homered behind a single
by Roger Mars in the sixth to
wipe out an early 1-0 Cleveland
lead, and the Yanks exploded for
four more runs in the seventh to
give Art Ditmar his eighth victory
in 15 decisions. Dick Stigman
(4-6) was the loser.
Gene Freese, with five hits, and
Jim Landis drove in four runs
each for the White Sox Freese
hit a three-run homer, doubled
twice and singled twice. Nellie
Fox, Roy Sievers and Minnie Mi-
oso also homered for Chicago to
make Wynn's fifth victory in 11
decisions an easy one,]
Law, needing help from Fred
Green and Elroy Face in the
eighth after the Cards scored
their four runs in the seventh, ran
his record to 13-5 and won his
10th straight over St. Louis.
Baseball's Top Ten
AMERICAN LEAGUE
Player and Club A H Pt.
Skowron, New York . .309 103 .333
Smith, Chicago ......345 112 .325
Minoso, Chicago .....350 11 .320
Power, Cleveland ...31 101 .31
Severs, Chicago ...241 7 .315
Mars. New York .....310 97 .313
Gentile, Baltimore ...214 67 .313
Aspromonte, Clv'land 211 6 .313
Runnels, Boston . ..323 100 .310
Kuenn, Cleveland ...320 95 .297
HOME RUNS
Marts, New York.................31
Mantle, New York............... is
Lemon, Wahington........... .4
Colavito, Detroit.............,..21
Skowroni, New York .............Is]
RUNS BATTED IN
Mats, New York ..... ..... ....79
Skowon, New York............67
Minoso, Chicago ..............6?2
Gentile, Baltimore..............61
Mantle, New York...............60;
Lemon, Washington............60

MICKEY MANTLE
..25th homer

NEW YORK (R) - Four bigI
league pitchers working for second
division teams could well apply for
membership today to URO-Un-
derrated Relievers Organization.
While Gerry Staley of the Chi-
cago White Sox, Lindy McDaniel,
of St. Louis, Ed Roebuck of Los
Angeles and Elroy Face of Pitts-
burgh have been hogging most of
the headlines, the proposed ,tRO
applicants have been toiling skill-
fully, but with little recognition.'
The four are Mike Fornieles of.
Boston, Dick Farrell of Philadel-
phia, and- Jim Brosnan and Bill
Henry of Cincinnati.
Saves Games
Fornieles, 28 - year - old Cuban
right-hander, has won six games
and lost one. He has a, winning
percentage of .857 for a team
that has a winning percentage of
,40'. In addition, Fornieles has,

UNDERRATED RELIEVERS:
Unheralded Pitchers
work To Sav ae

SCORES
Bacteriology 12, Nuclear Engineer-
ing 5
Aits vs.Ra m able--postponed due
to adverse ground conditions.

Olympics Coach Cromwell
Predicts Track,_Field Win

LOS ANGELES (-) - Former
Olympic head coach Dean Crom-
well yesterday forecast great suc-
cess for the United States track
and field team in Rome this sum-
mer.
And in a quieter but equally re-
assuring tone, Uncle Sam's decath-
lon star, Rater Johnson, predicted.
it will take a record score to win
the 2-day, 10-event grind in the
coming Olympics.
And hammer-throwing cham-
pion Harold Connolly anounced
he will be seeking to better his
world mark of 225 feet 4 inches
and his Olympic mark of 207-3,,
even before he heads for Rome in
meets coming up in Southern Cali-
fornia Aug. 5 and 12.
Connolly is still pampering a
badly torn back muscle but said
the injury is gradually responding
to treatment.
The three were guests at a
track and field writers' luncheon.
Johnson, who set a record score
of 8,683 in the recent national
AA. decathlon at tihgenh, Ore.,
admitted that 9,000 Or more ltbiflts
are possible.
"If I had two good days I sup-
pose I could reach that figure,"
the ex-UCLA athlete said.
He said he expected C. K. Yang,
of UCLA, who will compete at
Rome for Nationalist China and
who finished second in the recent
national, to give him the most
competition.
Dave Edstrom of Oregon, how-
ever, could be a threat and a big
help to the United States if a leg
injury mends before Rome-time,
Johnson said.
Was he looking forward to meet-
ing his old foe, Russia's Vasily
Chevrolet Now
To Host Band
"See The USA In Your Chevro-
let" will sound through the sta-
dium in the round tones of the
University Marching Band this
fll.
The band will travel to Madi-
son, Wisconsin, Oct. 29 for the
Michigan - Wisconsin football
game as guests of the Chevrolet
Motor Division of General Motors,
band director William P. Revelli
and Chevrolet public relations di-
rector John L. Cutter jointly an-
nounced.
This will be the band's first as-
sociation with Chevrolet after
many years with the Buick division
as host on an annual fall trip as
well as to the Rose Bowl in 1948
and 1951.

Kuznetsov, with whom he has
been swapping the world record
for the past few years?
"I'm always looking forward to
meeting him," said Johnson, who
defeated the Russian in Moscow in
a dramatic meeting in 1958.
Cromwell, who strung years of
success with titles while coaching
the University of Southern Cali-
fornia, was highly enthusiastic.
Coach of the 1948 American.
team, Cromwell declared t h e
United States could leave its top
three athletes at home and win
the games with the next three.

'

saved four games for the seventh--
place Red Sox while compiling a:
neat earned run average of 2.90.
Farrell has won seven games
and saved six for the Phils, who
are- seventh in the National
League. The fast-balling righty
has appeared in 35 of his team's
80 games. He has walked only 19
and fanned 49 His, ERA .is 2.61.
Brosnan and' Henry have been
key pitchers in 26 of Cincinnati's
41 victories. Brosnan has four
triumphs and six saves and the
left - handed Henry has been
credited:with one victory and 15
saves. Brosnan's ERA is 2.35 and
Henry's 3.79.
Relief Pitchers

WASHINGTON (A') - W ashii
ton bumped Frank Lary for t
runs in the first inning last ni
then the Detroit right hander tc
charge as the Tigers fought i
for a 5-3 victory.
The win moved Detroit int
tie for fifth place with the Se
tors. Lary, winning his ni
against nine losses, gave up a
en hits.
It. was the fifth time Lary
beatei Washington this year
six. starts.
For, Washington starter Pe(
Ramos, it was his 11th dereat.
has won six.
Reno Bertoia led off the Wa
ington first with a triple a
scored on Lennie Green's outf

Johnny Klippstein of Cleveland
also has been among the least
heralded, but most effective relief
pitchers. He has won three games
and saved eight.for the .fourth-
place Indians. Klippstein's earned
run average is a gaudy 1.83.
Other potential URO members
are Ray Moore, Truman Clevenger
and Chuck Stobbs of Washington
and Ron Piche. of Milwaukee. Ray
Moore has won one game and
saved five since June 15 when he
was acquired fromthe White Sox.
Clevenger has six saves. Stobbs is
4-0 as a reliever while Piche has,
two victories and five saves for
the second-place Braves. Don
Elston of the Cubs has a 6-5 mark
and half a dozen saves.
Staley has a 9-4 record with five
saves for theleague-leading White
Sox. McDaniel's mark is 7-3 with
15 saves. Roebuck is 8-2 with six
saves and Face is 5-5 and has
saved 14 games.

FRANK LARY
... fights to win
fly. Billy Gardner's two-out home
run scored Bob Allison, who had
reached first on an error, and
Washington led by three.
The Tigers got back in the
fourth when Rocky Colavito hi1
his 21st home run, scoring Nel
Chrisley, who had singled.
The Tigers moved ahead with
two more in the sixth. Colavito
singled with one out. Norm Cash
singled and Colavito scored on ar
error. Lou Berberet singled to loac
the bases and the second run
scored after Chico Fernandez's
outfield fly.
The final Detroit run came in
the eighth on singles by Frank
Bolling, Berberet and Fernandez.

CLSIID

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
MUSIC CENTER
Headquarters for
Hi Fi Stereo Record Players
Tape Recorders
Accessories and Service
Complete Service Department
37 Years Experience.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

LINES
2
3
4

I DAY
.80
.96
1.1I2

3 DAYS
2.00
2.40,
2.80

6 DAYS
2.96
355
4.14

300 S. Thayer

NO 2-2500
x21

§4
Fial SALE
Fmal Reduction on Selected Items
§ Dress Shirts Knit POLO Shirts
Values to 10.95
Y2 OFF x
NOW;3.38 Reg. Prices 4.95 to 15.95
Lad ies bermudas Ladies' Shirts
§ 20FF f/2OFF,
Reg. Prices 8.95 to 16.50 Reg. Prices 6.50 to 10.00
WASH 'n WEAR SUITS
Were 28.95.......... ......NOW 15.95
§ Were 39.95 .... .NOW 29.95
Were 45.00 to 52.50........ . . ..NOW 35.95

PIANOS.
Buy Now before the fall rush. No
Payments till school starts. Free
Lesson included.
UPRIGHTS-From $59.50.
GRAND&-From $395.
USED LESTER SPINET-Beautiful
blonde, mahogany finish. New
$795, now $479.
GET ON. THE FESTIVAL BAND
WAGON - Ends July 30. Savings
up to $500 on such makes as Stein-
way, Knabe, Geo. Steck. Leonar,
Clayton, Vose, etc. Also Grinnell's.
GRINNELL S
323 S. Main St.
Complete line of Hi F1 components
including kits; complete service on
radios, phonographs and
Hi F1 equipments.
H I FI STUDIO
1317 South University
1 block east at Campus Theatre
.X2
PIANOS-ORGANS NEW & USED
Ann Arbor Piano & Organ Co.
21:1 E. Washington NO 3-3109
X1
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessor-
iea. Warranted & guaranteed. See
us for the best price on new &
used tires. Road service-mechanic
on duty.
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it!"
1220 S. University at Forest
NO 8-9168

Figure 5 average
Call Classified between 1 :
and 9:00 and 11 :30 Satur
BUSINESS SERVICES
JUST THROW your last good pan at
the neighbor's night-owl cat? Replace
it at
RALPH'S MARKET
'09 Packard NO 5-7131
"Open every night 'til Midnight"
J22
TYPING: Theses, term papers, reason-
able rates. Prompt service. NO 8-7590.
J11

OPTICIANS
Most frmnes replaced
while you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated.
FAST service on all repairs.

CAMPUS

wrrdz to a line.
:0 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
rday - Phone NO 2-4786
PERSONAL.
Dear B,
You better be lining up some cool
parties for this weekend.
B. F
GIRLS-HELP! I need dates to he
me forget an unhappy romance. Set
or, 23, kindhearted and considera1
but lonely. Call Mac, 8-7702 for'
coffee date before further commi
ment. P
COMING-The Duke - Louie -- Cat
nonball - The Count - Brubeck
Dinah -- Nina - Dakota plus'other
American Jazz Festlval. Detroit
August 18-21 - Tickets on sale Mus
Center, 300 S. Thayer. R
WATCH the GOP Convention on TV
the Cafe Protmethean! F
W'ANTED: Garage space near Stockwe
for Corvette Starting Aug. 1 for
year. Will pay well. Call E. Quad E
Strauss. F
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE: 3 bedroom older home, to
doors from Burns Park at lIA8 Ma
tin Pi. Large carpeted living-dinir
room plus 12k15 music or TV poor
large hall 'upstairs suitable for stud,
screened porch and large bacyar
excellent dry basement; gas hea
Minimum down payment if desire
Owner leaving town. Phone NO 2-213
GRAD STUDENT leaving. Nice 2 bdi
basement, large lot. Phone 3-2595. 1
LAKEWOOD SUBDIVISION: 3 bedroo
ranch. 308 Mason Ave. Near new el(
mentary school. Landscaped lot. Fu
basement. $15,500 FHA. Discount 'f
conventicnal financing. NO,2-8101.
P
USED CARS
'54 FORD. New motor. $175. NO 5-71
after 5:30. N
GOING HOME, so have to sell beautif
two-toned Plymouth 56. It's loadef
Call NO 2-0857 or see it at 1120. Oak
land. 'N
1953 PONTIAC. Automatic, new p1u
exhaust. $245. NO 5-6203 evenings

Your last chanceto see
ART FROM MANY LANDS,.
Our Summer Show
c
FORSYTHE GALLERY
201 Nickels Arcade -over post office
aa^ csntc oamsecceo- noco<a c"cscc- r

240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9114 NO 8-6019
,J 3
FOR RENT
CAMPUS 3-room nicely furn. apart-
ment. Private bath. $87.50. NO 3-4322.
C38
3 ROOM APARTMENT partlyfurnished.
Washing facilities. $85 a month plus
utilities. 401 Pauline.Bl"d. Can see
anytime. Contact; Mrs. Mamie Burke,
16s Franklin. C33
THREE ROOM apartment near campus.
Off-streea parking. $75 per month.
Call NO 3-6421 after &. C37
DOUBLE or SINGLE rooms.Graduate
women. Cooking. 517 E. Ann St. NO
2-2826. C36
CAMPUS-Large quiet rooms for men.
Low.rates. Linens furnished. NO
3-4747. 630
FOR SALE
MODERN 40 FOOT 2 bedroom trailer.
Must sell. Call GE 7-5560. B6
HI FT PHONOGRAPH: Bozak speaker
system. Excellent. sound. Low price.,
NO 2-8081 evenings. B5

l

11

TONIGHT, JULY 27, at 8 P.M.
Hillel's Second Dialogue

Dail yCl assifi
Bring Resudl

811.

II "The Bible on Broadway"

WHITE'S aUTO SHOP
N u m p i0d P a

I I

m~ tl % x i r, i irvi u r U

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