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July 11, 1962 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-07-11

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNE DAY. 'Y' 11,1962

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY WFDNF.~nAV. JT1LY II. IflE~

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'NOT ONE WAY':
Challenges Teaching Concept

The concept that teaching is a
one-way transaction, like a blood-
transfusion, is challenged by Prof.
G. Max Wingo, of the education
school in the current issue of the
School of Education Bulletin.
"Communication may be the
life-blood of learning, but the
learning process itself is always
selective and personal," he ex-
plained.
"When we educate a child we
help relate to his own experience
the previous experiences of man-
kind. We give him the chance to
learn the skills and attitudes that
make for the development of in-
telligence. Beyond this we can do
nothing."
Good Teacher
Prof. Wingo notes that many
people in effect conceive of the
good teacher as one who presents
his material well, and the good

student as one who can give it
back to the teacher without it be-
ing altered.
He points out that presently
technological devices are being in-
vented and used for transmitting
materials, such as the television,
which enables one teacher to reach
thousands of pupils at a time in-
stead of only a few.
"My purpose is not to quarrel
with the new technology. I am not
among those who think the teach-
ing machine is in some way im-
moral. If education is fundamen-
tally the transmission of informa-
tion, then what right-thinking
person can possibly quarrel with
the new technology? It's the 'if'
that is important," he says.
Forget Much
Prof. Wingo explains that peo-
ple simply persist in forgetting
most of what is communicated to

them. "Nature has a built-in me-
chanism to protect us from com-
plete intellectual indigestion. The
student can always forget, and he
always does.
"The real power of the human.
intellect does not lie in its mere
ability to retain information, but
rather in its ability to perceive the
relations among events and so
control them.
Across
-Campus
Prof. William Haber of the
economics department will speak
on "American Youth and Employ-
ment" at 4:15 p.m. today in Aud.
A as part of the "American Youth"
lecture series.
Biology ...
Prof. J. Herbert Taylor of the
botany and zoology departments
of Columbia University will dis-
cuss "DNA Replication and
Chromosome Reproduction at 9
a.m. today and Norman G. Ander-
son of the biology division of the
Oak Ridge National Laboratory
will explain "Molecular Machines"
at 10:15 a.m. as part of the Sum-
mer Biological Symposium of "Cel-
lular and Subcellular Replication;"
both lectures are in Aud. B.

F

---------------

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL
1429 Hill
TODAY: 7:30 LECTURE:
The Cold War and Defects in
America's Peace Movement
DR. WILLIAM LIVANT
and Tomorrow -MIDTERM MIXER
ALL WELCOME

College
Roundup]
By ROBERT SELWA
CHICAGO - College students
smoke too much, according to the
American Cancer Society.
The society's 74-member board
of directors unanimously condemn-
ed "the apparently intensified pro-
motional campaign in colleges to
increase the sales of cigarettes to
college students" and decided to
do something about it.
The board ordered its staff to
write letters to university and col-
lege presidents urging them to re-
consider the propriety "of tobacco
company sponsorship of athletic
events in light "of the deleterious
affects of smoking on health."
Such sponsorship results in ad-
vertising appeal "to the very age
group which the society is most
anxious to prevent from being sub-
ject to the persuasion to smoke,"
the directors say.
* * *
STILLWATER-Oklahoma State
University has expelled nine stu-
dents for taking part in a May 24
campus riot.
Ten others were put on proba-
tion for "unlawful assembly and
disturbance" and four others face
trial this fall and possible suspen-
sion.
Those suspended received their
grades and will be permitted to
re-enroll after one year. Those on
probation may return to the cam-
pus in the fall under varying re-
strictions.
* * *
MINNEAPOLIS-The University
of Minnesota is establishing a
graduate school in business admin-
istration.
The reason for this move is .hat
a professional businessman must
be both a well-educated man and
a professionally trained adminis-
trator, Dean Paul Grambsch of
Minnesota's school of business ad-
ministration explained.
He predicted that, with suffi-
cient funds, the graduate school
will be in full scale operation by
1968. The present business ad-
ministration school will be re-
tained as a two-year undergrad-
uate degree-granting college, he
said.
"A top-flight graduate school is
a leader in educational thought
and an integral part of the busi-
ness community," Grambsch add-
ed.
Places Second
In 'Who's Who'
The University ranks second
among public universities whose
graduates provide the mostwnew
names in the latest edition" of
"Who's Who in America," the
Association of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges reports.
The University of California
ranks first. Ranking from third
to tenth are the University of Wis-
consin, the University of Illinois,
the University of Minnesota, the
City University of New York, the
University of Washington, Ohio
State University, the University of
Texas and the University of Mis-
souri.

VISIT SOVIETS-Like their counterparts, 40 University students will tour Russia this summer. After
taking a four-week intensive course in Russian, they will tour Soviet cities speaking only Russian.
'MAY LOSE ESSENSE':
Austin Stresses Religious Tenacity

M

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STUDY CULTURE:
'U' Students To Embark on Tour of Russia

9e4 tIS/

OF, FRENCH FILMS
Four award-winning French films with English subtitles: Wednesdays at
7:30 P.M. in the Multipurpose Room of the Undergraduate Library.

/

Wednesday, July 11

(Today):

WE ARE ALL MURDERERS
1952.

(Nous sommes tous les assassins),

Wednesday, July 18:
GATES OF PARIS

By MARJORIE BRAHMS
"The majority of students today
seem to stay within their own
faith and learn to come to terms
with it," C. Grey Austin, assistant
coordinator of religious affairs,
commented recently.
However, this identification is
often with a religious institution
rather than with the essence of
the religious tradition, he added.
"Others change their religious
affiliations because the opportun-
ity for 'self-discovery' exists here,
along with the challenge to exam-
ine beliefs and to be as intelligent
about religion as about future
careers," Austin added.
Outlines Policy
Commenting on the role of the
University in a student's religious
life, Austin said that the Univer-
sity should have a consistent policy
toward students, meaning that the
freedom to explore and grow in the
intellectual sphere should be
matched by the same freedom in
religious, moral and ethical areas.
In particular, Austin cited free-
dom in personal lives and living
units.
"Many parents and home
churches unrealistically expect
college to offer a protection that
is not consistent with growth," he
added.
"The religious groups on this
campus are basically concerned
with the individual and society's
moral and ethical problems," Aus-
tin noted. Significant questions
relevant to the everyday world are
explored in depth in campus re-
ligious groups.
Notes Failure
He cited the failure of the in-
stitutional church, as noted by
many scholars, to be relevant to
the important questions of the
day.
"It is not surprising then that
the student's experience with his
high school youth group would
lead him to expect that campus
foundations are much like them,"
he said.

Discussing religion in the world
of today, Austin commented that
"People are very much concerned
with the world situation. Some
turn to the churchi for comfort
as though it had a magical power;
others because within the church
some of the best thinking about
today's problems and their solu-
tions is going on.
Seek Answers
'Many other people search for
answers outside of the church. In
a way this is unfortunate because
they are cut off from the resources
of the church."
As always the number of really
religious people, those with a firm,
basic commitment, is rather few,
Austin noted, because it inevitably
puts one in conflict with society.
Explaining this point, Austin
said that the Christian in society
today is very much aware of the
real difference between what his
religion preached and the way in
which society restricts such things

as the housing and employment of
Negroes.
Arms Conflict
"There is also great conflict
between the arms race and the
Christian ethic of loving your
enemy," he added.
In religion, the real worth has
always been measured in the ex-
tent to which it can be applied to
the current problems.
"More than prayer and worship
are needed today in religion. An
active concern with underpriv-
iliged people and nations is nec-
cessary. Ethics and politics must
mix with each other," Austin said.
Changes in Society
"Much of that which keeps men
from being free and responsible
is built into societal structures.
The person who stands within the
Christian-Judeo tradition,and is
not involved in seeking to change
society, denies that which he pro-
fesses to believe," Austin con-
cluded.

By ISAAC ADELEMO
Forty University students, the
largest in the three year history of
the tour, will leave for Russia late
this month on a Russian-speaking
cultural tour of the Soviet Union.
Every summer since 1960 the
University has taken students who
have had the equivalent of two
years of college Russian for a
four-week intensive course after
which they go on a tour of the
Soviet Union.
Speak Only Russian
"The intensive course (4 hours
of Russian everyday) lays empha-
sis on listening and speaking. This
is very essential since the par-
ticipating students have promised
to speak only Russian during their
entire stay in the Soviet Union,"
Prof. Dewey of the Slavic Lan-
guages and Literature department,
said.
The purpose of the University
Russian study tour program has
both a linguistic and a cultural
aspect. It aims to develop the
participants' speaking ability, flu-
ency, and listening comprehension
in Russian, he said.
"They are going to be plunged
right into the atmosphere which
will demand all these three as-
pects of language learning," Prof.
Dewey explained.
The cultural aspect includes an
opportunity to have a first hand
contact with Soviet society and to
see with their own eyes certain
aspects of the social life.
No Book Substitute
Prof. Dewey termed the tour an
experience which no book however
well written can substitute. "There
is no better way of knowing a
people and understanding their
language than living among them"
he said.
Although this is not a part of
President John F. Kennedy's
"People-to-People Program" the
participants are going to face bat-
teries of questions. A sampling
from former tours shows that
questions on racial discrimination,
unemployment and "warmonger-
ing" designs of imperialists are
most commonly asked, Prof. Dewey
said.
The group will be leaving Ann
Arbor July 23 for New York where
they will board a Greek liner
which takes them to Athens. While
on board the ship they willbe re-
ceiving 3 hours of instruction daily.
They will transfer to a Soviet
ship in Athens August 5 for the
Soviet port of Odessa. They will
be visiting Kiev, Moscow and Len-
ingrad. The group hopes to leave
Leningrad September 2 by train
for Helsinki from whence they
will fly through Amsterdam to
New York.
Oberlin Violinist
To Present Recital
John Dalley, violinist in ,the
Oberlin String Quartet, will play
Bitali, Mozart, Resphighi, Milstein,
Block and Zimbalist in recital
8:30 p.m. today in the Rackham
Lecture Hall.
Dial 8-6416
COOL
NOW'

I

I

4

(Porte des Lilas),

1"

1957.

Wednesday, July 25:
THE RED AND THE BLACK

Campus Surveys Reveal
Secular College Atmosphere

(Le rouge et le noir), 1954.

.1
I
N

Wednesday, August 8:
GOD NEEDS MEN

(Dieu a besoin des hommes), 1951.

ADMISSION for the series, including membership in the French Club
$1.50. Individual admissions (50 cents) are also available.

is

Religion on the college scene
was recently analysed in a study
called "What College Students
Think," compiled by Rose K.
Goldsen, Morris Rosenberg, Robin
M. Wiliams, Jr., and Edward A.
Suchman.
There is a generally secular tonej
on campuses-even if religious be-
lief is widespread, religious com-
mitment is rare, it said.
Notes Retort
A need for religion means "a
sincere working philosophy or
code of ethics" to about 40 per
cent of college students questioned.
God is of little importance in the
essentials of an ideal belief sys-
tem. Goals which emphasize in-
dividual ends, societal functions

Dial
2-6264

61! ! yauCOOL
,' IHIIII~i O ENDING TONIGHT
KIM NOVAK
* TRING TrBOYS' NIGHT OUT"
*STARTING THURSDAY *

and ritualistic practices are more
important, the book declared.
At the University, 79 per cent
of those questioned agreed with
a need for faith, 45 per cent held
a believe in a divine God, and 28
per cent stated that they attended
services more than once a week.
However, only 17 per cent in-
dicated that they expected re-
ligion to be a major source of
satisfaction in life.
Few Atheists
Out of 2975 students questioned
in 11 universities, only one per
cent called themselves atheists.
Although students told the poll
takers they believe in God, go to
religious services, are aware of a
need for faith, and find religious
goals a focal point of life, appar-
ently there is no real need to hold
traditional religious beliefs and
they have been subordinated to
other interests: family, work,
leisure.
Thus, the area of strong com-
mitment is small; college students
appear too wrapped up in daily
events to find room for deep com-
mitments, it said.
Judging from what these two
different sources have noted, col-
lege students do have a definite
need for religion; whether it in-
cludes God or another supreme
being is incidental in many cases,
the book opined.
The fact remains that a need
exists to believe in and identify
with something, and within re-
ligion, many students find an an-
swer, it declared.
BILLIARDS
and
SWIMMING

ARE THE MEN AND WOMEN OF
WASHINGTON REALLY LIKE THIS?

I

IU's sheer. magic
AND.
present t
b 0 NY-F A
A MAGNA Production
0 strfibuted by 20th CENTURY-FOX ~K*";
Note-One complete show only,
starting at 7 P.M.

I

I

i

daily except Sun.

at the
MICHIGAN UNION

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