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July 04, 1962 - Image 3

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Michigan Daily, 1962-07-04

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 4, 1462

THE MICHIGAN' DAILY

PAGE THREE

WEDNESDAY, JULY 4,1982 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THREE

POLIO THERAPY:
Locate Clinic at U' Hospital

Show Japanese Art Exhibit at UGLI

CLASSIFIEDS

By JOAN SIMPSON
An experimental center of the
National Polio Foundation is lo-
cated at University Hospital.
According to Prof. D.,G. Dick-
inson, of the pediatrics depart-
ment, director of the center, its
purpose is to take care of patients
having polio and other paralytic,'
respiratory diseases, and acute
arthritics, and-children with birth
defects.
The center is well-known for its
emphasis on the training of a
"medical team" and its develop-
ment of new respirator equipment,
he says.
Two Engineers
Several types of respirator.
equipment are used. Prof. Dickin-
son said that these include the
iron lung, the rocking bed, thef
chest shell, portable respirators,
which can be attached to wheel-
chairs, and infant respirators, de-
veloped at the center, which
"breathes" up to a rate of 200
times a minute. Two engineers are
employed by the center to keep
old equipment in order and de-
velop new machines.
The center itself is one ward

they met when they were in the
hospital. Prof. Dickinson added
that in this way patients can find

To Examine

N

Trial Problems
Judge James J. Breakey, Jr.,
and Prof. Charles J. Joiner, of the
law school, will participate in the.
Pacific Northwest Seminar for
Trial Judges, held in Seattle July
9 to 11.
Breakey will speak and be a
panelist on "Proceedings in Crim-
inal Cases before Trial." Prof.
Joiner will take part in a panel
concerned with "Adopting Simpli-
Aed Rules of Evidence."

PROF. D. G. DICKINSON
-.-,.polio center
with a capacity of 15 patients. The
patients are of all ages and of both
sexes. Prof. Dickinson explained
that this arrangement keeps the
patients in contact with all kinds
of people during the relatively iso-
lated period of their illness.
Patients do not spend the dura-
tion of their illness in the hospital.
They come to the center at the
outset of their trouble.when they
develop serious complications,
when they need surgery, and when
it is time for their periodic check-
ups.
Center News Sheet
A publication sponsored by the
center keeps the patients informed
about where the people are that

out when their friends are going
to be in for check-ups and can
arrange to be in at the same time.
Prof. Dickinson pointed out that
the patients have two TV sets on
the ward, headphones for radio
programs, direct bedside phone
service, on-the-ward schooling for
children unable to leave the ward,
and an annual skit by the medical
staff. They even have hamburger
fries on the terrace adjoining the
ward which are attended by every-
one on the ward, including those
in iron lungs.
Patients receive treatment in
the physical medicine department
through use of hubbard tanks,
whirlpool baths, standing boards
to help patients adjust to a verti-
cal position, and parallel bars for
learning to walk.
Shrinking Muscles
Prof. Dickinson added that
much surgery is performed on pa-
tients with twisted and shrinking
muscles, twisted spines and de-
formed lung cavities. (One little
girl had just had a spinal fusion
and was to be in a body cast for
the next six months.)
One of the major purposes of
the occupational therapy depart-
ment is teaching skills for every-
day living such as making a bed
from a wheelchair, picking up a
telephone receiver with a weak
hand, getting into bed from a
wheelchair. This department also
teaches handicrafts to help pa-
tients use certain weak muscles.
Prof. Dickinson added that even
patients in iron lungs can be
taught certain skills, such as writ-
ing and painting by holding the
pencil or brush in their mouth.

By BRUCE CHARNOV
One hundred contemporary
Japanese prints, one of several
traveling foreign art exhibitions
sponsored by the Oregon State
University Memorial Union, are
now being displayed at the Under-
graduate Library.
The prints are designed by the
"s o s a j u hanga" printmakers.
These reflect their consciousness
of the earlier "Ukiyoe" disciplines
of art, but also display a passive
trend toward modern times, Prof.
Gordon W. Gilkey, head of the
Oregon State University art de-
partment explained in an accom-
panying folder.
The making of prints is an old
and honorable art in Japan. Be-
ginning in ancient times with
simple black-and-white woodcuts,
this art rapidly advanced to color
prints upon fine linen paper, Prof.
Gilkey said.
Intalagio Process
Recently several Japanese art-
ists have turned to the intalagio
process, or engraving prints in
copperplate and then pressing
them into the paper. In the past
the tradition was to engrave the
prints into fine grain wood and
let the grain emphasize the high-
lights of the composition, he
added.
Included in the exhibit are
prints by such widely known Jap-
anese artists as: Sugano, Miyashi-
ta, and Fukazawa.
Deep-Etched Prints
Sugano and Miyashita have
made some stunning deep-etch
copperplate prints, while Fuka-
zawa is famous for his use of soft
ground textures and lines, Prof.
Gilkey noted.
Also in this exhibit are prints
by Kumagai and Amano, who by
building up cloth textures on wood
and using a combination of inking
techniques, secure some unusual
1 color textures, he added.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4/86
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTER. Good
condition. Lights, storage compart.
Make an offer. Call after 6 NO 3-2089.
Z4
USED CARS
1961 SAAB-Fully equipped. 13,000 miles.
Best offer. NO 2-2763. N3
FOR SALE - '56 Volkswagen, rebuilt
motor, radio. In top condition. $695.00.
Phone YU 2-5551 Port Huron, Mich. N2
MISCELLANEOUS
SOUTH CENTRAL MICHIGAN Soaring
Society memberships open. Located in
Napoleon, Mich. Call NO 8-8338 after
6 P.M. I M4
DO YOU FEEL LOST at college? Do you
feel out of it because you don't know
what's going.on? Subscribe to the
summer Daily. Only $2.00. Call 662-
3241. M3
BUSINESS SERVICES
MANUSCRIPT PREPARATION-Mimeo-
graphing-transcription. 334 Catherine
Phone 665-8184. J11
HARPSICHORD INSTRUCTION by grad-
uate of Yale Shool of Music. Call NO
8-8309. J10

WANTED TO BUY
WANT TO BUY LIGHTWT GIRLS BIKE
Sandy Johnson, NO 5-4453. KI
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S WEAR; SUMMER SPECIALS.
Short sleeve sport shirts $1.25 up;
Wash & wear pants $3.95, 4.95, 5.95;
Briefs or shorts 69c; Canvas casuals
$2.95-3.95. Many other BIG BUYS.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington St.
Wi
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Daily photographers. Positions
open now. Join the staff and earn real
money. See Mike at 420 Maynard. A2
FOUND-A good place to spend your
spare time earning money. Join The
Daily photography staff. See Mike at
420 Maynard. Al
FOR SALE
740 c.c. Harl-Dav. motorcycle, $500. NO
5-4453 at 12:15 and 6:00. B7
FOR SALE-1960 Volvo; radio, heater,
whitewalls, 4-speed. Excellent shape.
Phone 479-7436. N4
GET into the swing of things. Order
your summer Daily now!!! Call 662-
3241. B2
DIAMONDS-Wholesale from our mines
to you. Buy direct and save. Robert
Haack Diamond Importers, 504 First
National Bldg. NO 3-0653. B5
TRANSPORTATION

-Daily-Bruce Charnov
YOUNG FACES-The print is one of 100 Japanese prints now
on display at the Undergraduate Library. The exhibit , features
the works of contemporary Japanese artists working in ancient
mediums. The' collection is sponsored by Oregon State University.
MODERN ALGEBRA:
NSF Grant To Maintain
Teacher's Math Institute

Cal-O3*5

1

....

..-
Call NO 3-4158

Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday .
$15.00 plus 9c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.

Famine, H
By JOHN RODERICK
Associated Press News Analyst
T 0 K Y 0 - Three uninvited
guests have for centuries clung to
the Chinese peasant's spare body
with the tenacity of blood suckers.
They are famines, hunger and
malnutrition.
Gaunt-eyed, they stride onto
the ravaged land in the wake of
droughts which leave the earth
cracked and blistered, of floods
which cover it with a muddy sea,
of swarms of locusts blackening
the sky and of man's unending
wars which desolate the rich coun-
tryside.
In the not so distant past, mil-
lions of Chinese died a lingering,
pain-wracked death because when
the land and its crops failed, there
was no communication system to
bring them relief supplies in time.
Misery Again
Floods, drought, locusts and
Communist mismanagement have
again brought misery to China's
millions.

unger, Malnutrition Plague China

MADRAS
SH IRTS
SALE PRICED
4.98

Drought today is menacing thef
rice crop in South China's Kwang-F
si province.c
In the past two years natural
calamities have sent the Chinesej
peasant reeling backward, blasted
his hopes for the good harvests
he needs to keep himself and theE
Red regime alive.-
Searing Heat
Nearly every province in China
has felt the searing heat of7
drought. China's wheat belt -
Hopei, Honan, Shantung, ShansiI
and Shensi provinces -- have suf-
fered the most.
At least 20 of the country's 26
provinces have felt the scourge
either of drought or floods. Mil-
lions of tons of water destroyed
crops in South China's populous
Kwangtung province, Manchuria's
Hei-Lungkiang and Shantung
provinces.
The starvation which in the
past would have automatically fol-
lowed these natural catastrophes
apparently does not exist on the
mainland. A network of railways,
canals, roads and airlines criss-
crossing the vast country helps
bring relief goods to the stricken
areas.
Hunger Present
But famine's ugly sisters, hun-
ger and malnutrition are, accord-
ing to reliable accounts, every-
where.
The over-worked Chinese mil-
lions, to whom want and scarcity
are almost commonplace, have
been reduced to a diet which hov-
ers between 1,800 and 1,950 cal-
ories a day, well below the mini-
mal standard for none-too-rich
Asia.
In Shanghai, families lick the
last bit of oil from their dinner
plates. And one junior Communist
official who escaped to Hong Kong
reports "You've got to steal to stay
alive in Communist China."
Disease Widespread
Beri beri, peripheral oedema,
night blindness and liver disorders
-all products of malnutrition-
are widespread.
All reports indicate that the
farmer, now being urged to re-
double his efforts toward obtain-
ing good harvests, is better off
than the proletariat of the cities.
He gets more food, more consumer
goods and can keep the food he
grows in private plots of land.
But hunger is sapping the na-
tion's energy. It weakens the vic-
tim and knocks out his will to
resist.
No Uprisings
Perhaps for this reason, and be-
cause Red leader Mao Tze-Tung
has insured the loyalty of his
troops by giving them more gener-
ous food rations, there are no con-
firmed reports of major uprisings
against the Red regime.
In January this year, arrivals

from the mainland said that the
authorities have called for in-
creased vigilance against sabotage
and subversion.
In March, the Chinese National-
ist news agency carried an uncon-
firmed report of the revolt of some
8,000 persons who seized rice from
commune granaries and distribut-
ed it to the hungry. The uprising
assertedly covered three. counties
and resulted in bitter fighting.
In April, the independent Hong
Kong newspaper New Life Evening
Post said that 1,000 rebellious Red
troops had taken to the hills to

wage guerrilla warfare against the
Communists.
Guerrilla Warfare -
Unrest has been reported in
Fukien province, closest to Nation-
alist China.
But there has been no reliable
evidence of a ground-swell of re-
volt throughout the country which
might seriously endanger the re-
gime's control.
The situation, however, could
change. New calamities, an ex-
ploding population and general
weariness could one day drive the
peasants past the explosion point.

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
With a $14,000 appropriation
from the National Science Foun-
dation, the University is sponsor-
ing an institutehfor junior and
senior high school teachers in
mathematics during the 1962-63
school year.
About 60 public and private
school teachers from within a 70-
mile radius have registered in the
graduate school and will receive
credit for in-service training.
That is, they will continue to
teach while being trained.
The participants will attend two
courses lasting three hours which
will be held Saturday mornings
throughout the year. The NSF will
pay for tuition, fees, travel and
textbooks for those persons ac-
cepted to the program.
Math Courses
Prof. Brumfiel of the math de-
partment will teach the courses
in modern algebra, r o u g h l y
equivalent to Math 412 and 415.
One of the problems found in
such a program is the vast differ-
ences in the mathematical back-
grounds of the individuals, Prof.
Brumfiel said.
A similar institute covering
number theory and geometry was
held last year for a slightly small-
er number of teachers. A proposal
for an institute to cover mathe-
matical analysis next year is
planned by the math department.
Broad Program
The institute is part of a broad
NSF educational program running
under grants of over $30 million.
Similar institutes are being held
on hundreds of other campuses.

The subjects covered include not
only mathematics but also the
natural sciences.
Prof. Brumfiel is co-author of
an entirely new series of modern
textbooks for junior and senior
high school students. He also
taught in last year's institute.
The Brumfiel-Shanks-Eicholz
series, named after the authors,
will eventually cover algebra and
geometry for the eighth through
twelfth grades.
The series was written under the
Ball State project, one of the few
important textbook projects in the
country. The books employ the
methods of modern mathematics,
with emphasis placed on proof and
theory.
'U' Sanitation
Expert .dies
Prof. William C. Hoad, founder
of the University's sanitary engi-
neering program died recently at
his home, at age eighty-eight.
Serving as head of the sanitary'
engineering program from 1912
until his retirement in 1945, Hoad
was well known nationally as a
sanitary engineer. He also was a
consultant to many cities on sani-
tary engineering problems.
Before coming to the University,
Prof. Hoad was chief engineer of
the Kansas State Board of Health
and professor at the University of
Kansas.

Variety is the SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
Picnic Supplies
Party Foods
Kitchen Supplies
Kosher Foods
709 PACKARD-OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT
J6
FOR RENT
SUMMER APT. for 2 or 3 on campus.
Call NO 8-8601. CS
FOR RENT-Good garage. Near State
and Packard. NO 2-0521 or 917 Mary
Street. C21
FOR RENT-Campus four room apt.
Summer price $60. Phone NO 3-4322.
C19
FOR RENT-2 bdrm. unfurnished house.
Utility room-screened porch. $115 per
month. Call NO 5-6772. C14
FOURTH GIRL TO SHARE HOUSE-
Will have own room. $50 July and
Aug. 2-2169. C23
APT. ON HILL ST. for 1 or 2 students
for fall-a11 furnished and utilities
paid. Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. C10
Summer Rates
Furnished apts. from $60 up. NO
5-9405. C20
FOR RENT-Lake front home 12 miles
from Ann Arbor, near US-23. 4 bdrms.
furnished, insulated, gas heat. $125
per month. Winter lease-Sept. to
June. Phone GE 7-2271. C24
NEW twu bedroom apartment units now
being completed on South Forest for
Sept. occupancy. For appoint, to see,
call Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor
NO 3-0511. C2
SUBLET immediately for summer. Two
bedrm., cool basement apt. Recently
redecorated, very comfortable, good
location, reduced price. Call 665-8944
evenings or 663-1511, ext. 277 days.
Ask for Bev. C4

514 E. WASHINdTON ST.

PERSONAL
CRAW, why must you be such a slave
driver. The helpless one. F4
HURRYI! Singers needed immediately
for Univ. Summer Choir. See Dr. Ali-
feris, Lane Hall. Flo
CREATIVITY STIFLED? Join The Daily
photography staff. Financial remuner-
ation. See Mike at 420 Maynard. F10
RECORD CLU$ needs members. We
spend the evening in dark rooms list-
ening to records. Meet at Engin Arch
evenings at 9:30, bring date and rec-
ords. F3
HELP WANTED
WE NEED HELP. Join The Daily pho-
tography staff now. Earn while enjoy-
ing life at The Daily. See Mike at 420
Maynard. H3
COLLEGE MEN
Part time nelp-17 hours per week.
Summer school student preferred.
Working schedule will be arranged to
fit class and study schedule if neces-
sary.
Salary offered-$50 per week.
Call Mr. Miller, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
662-9311. 1H1

01

UGLI Presents
Double Feature
The two movies "Umbrella" and
"Quetico" will be shown at 2 p.m.,
tomorrow in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the Undergraduate Library.
Coeds:
"Let us style a
FLATTERING HAIR-DO
to your individual needs."
- no appointments needed -
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

JULY SHOE SALE-

-Daily-Michael de Gaetano
FAMINE-Hunger, malnutrition and its attendant diseases stalk
the people of the Chinese mainland, especially in the central
plain and the Canton region near Hong Kong (circled). Despite
these deprivations the Communists have managed to keep the
loyalty of the people although several thousand fled to Hong
Kong when the opportunity permitted.

DRAST IC R EDUCTIONS on Men's
and Women's Shoes.
SAVE $$$
FOR WOMEN
Entire Stock of Spring
and Summer Dress Styles

I

------ M

FOR MEN

Authentic and woven
India Madras.
Button-down collar.
Short Sleeved
Assorted Colors
"T rian pj Over Tradition"
1209 South University
Open Monday till 8:30 P.M.

FLORSH ElMS
$16 80 - $1880
Reg. to 22.95
All Summer Shoes and Discontinued Styles
450 PAIRS
$8 90
Reg. to 12.95
$1190

$690
Reg, to 10.95

.d $890
Reg. to 12.95

Black Patent - Black, Blue, Red, Bone
White Calf
Hi and Mid Heels
CASUAL SPORT STYLES
$390w $490 -$590
Wedge and Barefoot Sandals
Flats - Loafers - Sport Ties
STACKED HEELS
by Pierre - Coach & Four - Allures
$490 to$89

I

SERVICES*
" Dry Cleaning
* Repairs
* Shirt Finishing
* Drop Off Laundry
" Coin Operated Self-Serve
Laundry

ESKIMO PRINTS

'FEATURES

" 24-Hour Service...
Sooner on Request
" Off-Street Parking
" Automobile Window Service
" Guaranteed Satisfaction
" New Techniques and Equipment
rar ri s

Reg. to 16.95
Vent-Ties - Loafers - Slip-Ons

WASHABLE CASUALS
by Kedettes - Oomphies

II

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