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July 04, 1962 - Image 4

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-07-04

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4

THE MICHIGAN DIIIV

XV V nIVV Qr% A'V rrrr v A 16n47'

av__________________________________ s- - . - ..,, aaua Y' LIPN

VibDtiX, JULY 4, 1962

Major League
Standings

AMERICAN
New York
Los Angeles
Cleveland
Minnesota
Detroit
Baltimore
Chicago
Boston
Kansas City
Washington

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
42 32 .568
43 34 .558
42 34 .553
44 37 .543
40 36 .526
39 39 .500
40 41 .494
36 42 .462
36 44 .450
26 49 .347

GB
if
1V
11/a
3
5
5%
8
9
16%

New York, Minnesota,
Detroit Win AL Games
By The Associated Press
home runs as the Yanks co
The New York Yankees, once
again powered by the home run from behind for their vict
bats of Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle's second blow broke a
Mantle, rallied for an 8-7 victory deadlock, which had been achie
over Kansas City yesterday and by Maris' second four-baser u
picked up a half game in the two mates aboard a few mini
jammed-up struggle for the Amer- earlier.
ican League lead. Minnesota achieved its first,
The Yankee victory moved them tory over Boston in six tries
a half game in front of the Los the basis of Harmon Killebre
Angeles Angels, who were rained one-run triple in the seventh i
out at Washington. Third place ing, and fine relief pitching
Cleveland was not scheduled and Ray Moore in the ninth.
fell off to a full game behind. Jake Wood's high hopper
Minnesota remained one and third with the bases loaded in
one-half games off the pace with 11th inning gave Detroit its
a 4-3 squeaker over Boston while tory over Chicago. Third-baser
Detroit stayed within striking Al Smith was able to force a r
range, three games back, in a 5-4, ner at third, but his throw to
11-inning triumph over Chicago plate was too late to prevent
in the only other American League game-winning run. Reliefer 1
game scheduled. Nischwitz got the victory, as
Maris and Mantle each hit two pitched four hitless innings.

ame
ory.
7-7
ved
with
Lutes
vic-
on
ew's
nn-
by
to
the
vic-
man
un-
the
the
Ron
he

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
New York 8, Kansas City 7
Minnesota 4, Boston 3
Detroit 5, Chicago 4 (11 inn.)
Los Angeles at Washington (rain)
TODAY'S GAMES
Kansas City at NewG Erk (2)
Los Angeles at Washington (2)
Minnesota at Boston (2)
Detroit at Cleveland (2)
Baltimore at Chicago ('2)

DOUG BICKLE
... lost to team

Biekle Lost
To Grsidderst
Michigan 1962 football fortunes
suffered a severe blow yesterday
with the disclosure that junior
place-kicker Doug Bickle will not
be available for duty this fall.
Bickle, who was third in team
scoring last season as a sopho-
more, has informed Ooach Bump
Elliott that he will not report for
the fall due to "academic and per-
sonal" reasons.
Standing 6-3 and weaighin'g 200,
Bickle is possibly the best place-
kicker in Michigan history, even
though he has played but one var-
sity season. Last fall he accounted
for 32 points on 20 conversions in
23 attempts and four field goals
in seven tries.
Aside from a place-kicker,
Bickle was also highly regarded
as an end. He played a total of
'74 minutes, and was one of two
lettermen expected to return at
end this fall.

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Los Angeles
San Francisco
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Philadelphia
Houston
Chicago
New ,York

W
54
53
46
44
41
39
34
32
30
21

L
29
29
32
35
35
40
44
43
52
55

Pct.
.651
.646
.590
.556
.539
.495
.436
.427
.366
.276

GB
52
8
9/
13
172
18
23/
29Y2

DAILY OFFICIAL B!
Nigg sggggiigg:#i#iiIM~siisil~iMW~s29..*t,...,..... ...ni23#Eii:IAAniA5:##ilgllg~s

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
San Francisco 10, New York 1
St. Louis 6, Milwaukee 5 (2nd inc.)
Pittsburgh at Houston (inc.)
Chicago at Cincinnati (Inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at San Francisco (2)
Philadelphia at Los Angeles (2)
Pittsburgh at Houston (2)
Milwaukee at St. Louis
Chicago at Cincinnati
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Christian Science Organization, Meet-
ing, July 5, 7:30 p.m., 528D SAB.
Le Cercle Francais, Meeting, Conversa-
tion. French Records, July 5, 3-5 p.m.,
3050 FB. Refreshments. Everyone Wel-
come. This club will be meeting reg-
ularly on Thursday from 3-5 p.m.,
throughout the summer school session.

B'NAI B'RITH H LLEL
1429 Hill
Presents 2 FILMS on
MODERN DAY ISRAEL
and DISCUSSION to follow
Thursday, July 5 . . 7:30
ALL WELCOME
DIAL C-O-o-L ENDING TODAY
226111 110 JAMES STEWART
I-I6264 '' .1111"MR. HOBBS TAKES
nu y 1IIINA VACATION"~
STARTS THURSDAY
MGM AND JOSEPH E. LEVINE PRESENT
Of f()t gZ *** V
IN A MARTIN RANSOHOFF PSODUCTIOM
* -' ~N~Lu
i
for~~ik e sex"s.'
..* .. ~
.a......
lkeasex
us!
t { ;

(Continued from Page 2)
their names with Prof. Warner G. Rice
1601 Haven Hall. The examinations will
be given as follows: English literature,
1550-1660, Tues., July 17; Eng. and
American Lit, 1660-1780, Sat., July 21;
Engl and American Lit., 1780-1850, Tues.,
July 24; Engl. and American Lit., 1850-
1930, Sat., July 28. The exam. will be
given in 2601 Haven Hall from 9:00
a.m. to 12:00 m.
Following is the Foreign Visitor who
will be on Campus this week on the
dates indicated. Program arrangements
are being made by the International
Center.
July 5 & 6, Mr. Vincent Ike of Ni-
geria, University of Nigeria, Dept. of
Registrar.
Events
Around the World Series II will fea-
ture India on July 6, Fri., from 8 to
10 p.m. The program consists of movies
of the Taj Mahal, Spring Comes to
Kashmir, and Song of Maharastra. It
will be followed by Indian Music and
Dance Performances. Refreshments will
be provided. Around the World Series
will feature China next week.
Doctoral Recital: Samuel Jones, bari-
tone, will present a recital on Thurs.,
July 5 at 8:30 p.m., in Lane Hall Aud.
He will play the compositions of
Brahms, Samuel Barbar and DeFalla.
He will be accompanied by Arthur
Becknell, pianist. Open to the public.
Summer Biological Symposium: The
13th annual symposium will be held
July 9th through 11th, and will be
devoted to the topic, "Cellular and
Subcellular Replication." Allusessions
will be in Angell Hall, Aud. B, and will
be open to the public. The schedule
for Mon., July 9, is: 9:00 a.m., N. G.
Anderson (Oak Ridge), "The Structure
of Living Systems"; 10:15 a.m., Katsu-
ma Dan (Tokyo), "Theories of Cyto-
plasmic Division"; 2:30 p.m., Herbert
Stern (Urbana), "Biochemical Approach-
es to Mitosis"; 8:00 p.m., E. Kellenberg-
er (Geneva), "Electron Microscopy of
DNA-Containing Plasmas." Lectures on
Tues., July 10th, include: 9:00 a.m., H.
Stern, "Gene Regulation as the Source
of Mitotic Behavior": 2:00 p.m., J. H.
Taylor (Columbia), "The Molecular Or-
ganization of Chromosomes in Relation
to Their Structure and Function"; 3:30
p.m., E. Kellenberger, "The Organiza-
tional State of the DNA in Resting and
Replicating DNS Plasmas." The sched-
ule for Wed., July 11, includes: 9:00
a.m., J. H. Taylor, "DNA Replication
and Chromosome Reproduction"; 10:15
a.m., N. G. Anderson, "Molecular Ma-
chines"; 2:30 p.m., K. Dan, title to be
announced. For further information,
contact D. G. Shappirio, 3118 Natural
Science Bldg.
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts and Schools of Business Admin.,
Education, Music, Natural Resources,
Nursing, and Public Health: Students
who received marks of I, X, or "no re-
port" at the end of their last semester
or sumnier session of attendance will
receive a grade of "E" in the course or
courses unless this work is made up.
In the College of Lit., Science and The
Arts and in the Schools of Music and
Nursing this date is by July 25. In the
Schools of Bus. Admin., Education, Nat-
ural Resources and Public Health, this
date is by July 25. Students wishing
an extension of time beyond these dates
should file a petition with the appro-
priate official of their school.
Linguistics Forum Lecture: Prof. Jo-
seph K. Yamagiwa will discuss "Japa-
nese Language and Japanese Culture"
on Thurs., July 5 at 7:30 p.m. in the
Rackham Amphitheater.

Scheduled for five successive Thurs.,
June 28 through July 26, the lectures
will touch upon the theory of learn-
ing, programmed instruction, and ap-
plication of mathematics to behavioral
and biological sciences.
Open to the public, as guests of the
Summer Session, the lectures will all be
at 2 p.m. in Aud. C, Angell Hall, except
for the opening lecture which will be
in Aud. A.
The complete schedule:
July 5-Robert S. Fouch, mathematics
editor of Science Research Associates,
and A. Joseph Kramer, Encyl. Britanni-
ca consultant, "Programmed Instruc-
tion in Mathematics."
July 12-Prof. Anatol Rapoport, U-M
Mental Health Research Institute,
"Mathematics and the Behaviorial Sci-
ences"
July 19-Prof. Robert B. Davis, Mathe-
matics Dept., Syracuse University, "'The
Madison Project and Algebra for the
Elementary School."
July 26-Prof. Frederick E. Smith,
U-M Dept. of Zoology, "Mathematics
and the Biological Sciences."
Dr. Asger Aaboe of Yale University
will lecture on Babylonian Mathematics
in the Assembly Hall of the Rackham
Bldg. at 7:30 p.m., Thurs., July 5.
Mathematics Education Summer Lec-
ture: Robert S. Fouch, Mathematics
Editor, Science Research Associates and
A. Joseph Kramer, Consultant, TEMAC
(Encyclopedia Britannica) will speak
on Programmed Instruction in Math, at
2 p.m. In Aud. C, Angell Hall on Thurs..
July 5.
Placement
POSITION OPENINGS:
Carroll Public Library, Carroll, Iowa
-Immed. need for Librarian. Prefer
qualified librarian, but will accept
someone who has had some library
study or training even though she may
not have attained degree.
Washington State Civil Service -
Openings for Fisheries Biologists. Mini-
mum requirements are: Bachelor's with
major in fisheries biology or in other
science fields (voo., biol., forestry, etc.)
plus 1 yr. exper. in fisheries biology or
1 yr. grad study in fisheries. Advanced
degrees & more exper. required for
higher level positions.
Pennsalt Chemicals Corp., Philadel-
phia, Pa.-Men or Women for both per-
manent & summer positions. Graduate
Chemists in organic synthesis research
work relating to agricultural chemicals.
Oppor. for ass'n. with highly competent
scientists in this field.
American Hospital Supply Corp., Evan-
ston, I1.-Recent college grad to serve
as Personnel Director of Mueller Div.
in Chicago. Minimum of 2 yrs. exper.
in personnel work. Prefer man between
ages of 24 & 27. Possibly someone who
is now in college recruiting work or
some other phase of personnel admin.
Michigan Civil Service-Surplus Prop-
erty Executive. Bachelor's degree plus
1 yr. exper. in business, public service
or military service in procurement, pur-
chasing, merchandising and/or ware-
housing of materials. Subject to travel.
Apply by July 23.
Wisconsin Civil Service - 1) Park
Planner-MS Park Planning & 2 yrs.
exper. in park plan. & development
work. Apply by Sept. 10. 2) Principal
of Childrens Treatment Prog.-MA in
Educ. of emotionally disturbed & 3 yrs.
exper. teaching emotionally disturbed.
Apply by July 20. 3) Principal of Ado-
lescent Treatment Prog.-MA in Educ.
& 3 yrs, exper. teaching mentally or so-
cially maladjusted children. 4) Pharma-
cist-Registration as Pharmacist in
Wis. plus 3 yrs. pharmacy exper. in-
clud. some supervision. 5) Printing Es-
timator-Degree with major in graphic
arts & 3 yrs. exper..in printing indus-
try. Apply by July 12.

Mrs. Hantze
Only Yank
In Tourney
WIMBLEDON, England 03) -
Mrs. Karen Hantze Susman, 19-
year-old American girl from Chula
Vista, Calif., moved into the semi-
finals of the women's singles at
the 76th Wimbledon Lawn Tennis
Championships yesterday - the
only American left in the singles.
Mrs. Susman defeated Rene
Schuurman of South Africa 6-4,
6-4 in one of the many upsets of
the day.
Mrs. Vera Sukova, a 30-year-
old Czech, pulled off the biggest
surprise of the day by knocking
out second-seeded Darlene Hard
of Long Beach, Calif., 6-4, 6-3.
Unseeded Billie Jean went out
herself yesterday. She was defeat-
ed by Ann Haydon, the fifth seed
from Britain 6-3, 6-1.
ULLETIN
National Educational Television and
Radio Center, Ann Arbor, Mich.-Secre-
tary-College bkgd., not necessarily a
degree. Exper. not absolutely necessary.
Will have receptionist duties. Prefer
shorthand. Must be proficient typist.
Fairly attractive. Will use dictaphone.
Immed. opening.
For further information, please call
Gen. Div., Bureau of Appts., 3200 SAB,
Ext. 3544,
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, at
NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.
MALE
-Several students to sell subscriptions
to the Michigan Daily on a com-
mission basis.
FEMALE
1-To cook for one person and live in.
Bus runs by house.
-Several students to sell subscrip-
tions to the Michigan Daily on a
commission basis.
1-Student companion for 17 year old
blind girl. Must live in dorm. For
fall semester.
1-To live with family, doing house
work and taking care of two chil-
dren 5 and 7 years old. Would have
to be willing to go out of town and
spend the summer on Lake Erie.
Would have 112 days off per week
excluding Sat. and Thurs. Pay rate
would be $20 per week plus room
and board.

Special To The Daily
HONOLULU-Michigan's never
quit baseball squad took a 6-1 'vic-
tory from the Pearl Harbor Ad-
mirals here Monday evening for
their fifth straight win over Ha-
waii service teams .
It ran the 'M' season record to
38-15, and gave senior pitcher
John Kerr his 10th victory of the
season. Kerr allowed the Admirals
only six hits.
'M' Scores Often
Michigan collected but one more
hit off pitchers Gerry Hardison
and Ed Brown, but managedto
score two runs in the first and
fourth innings, and single tallies
in the seventh and eighth stanzas.
Nine stolen bases helped the
Wolverine cause. Shortstop Dick
Honig had three of the Michigan
hits, while Captain and Center-
fielder Ed Hood collected two.
Coach Don Lund's squad has
four more games scheduled before

'4

returning to Ann Arbor. They
faced the Hawaii Marines in a re-
turn game last night, having beat-
en them 7-3 last week.
Four Re-Matches
The other three games are
scheduled for this Thursday, Fri-
day and Saturday, against the
Subpac Raiders, the Pearl Harbor
Admirals and the Hickam Flyers.
Michigan has beaten each of these
teams once.
The squad is scheduled to fly
back to California on Monday, and
then on to Ann Arbor for those
who live in this area.
I=M SORES
Bio-Chemistry 14, Cooley 'B' 3
Other Games Postponed

ED HOOD
.. .Captain hits

FOUR MORE GAMES:
Michigan Beats Fifth Service Team

A

DOMINICK'S Use Our Convenient Drive-In Service
PIZZAS-SUBS
812 Monroe
WE DELIVER--
NO 2-5414

.1

COMING ...
THE U-M PLAYERS PRODUCTION OF* PETER SHAFFER'S
CRITICS' CIRCLE AWARD PLAY,

_-

WLQ

THE SLICKEST WAY TO A GIRL'S
HEART IS THROUGH HER
FEMININE CURI)SITY

J-

~

'er ectwtioxr n oern Coolng

Uproarious, Adult Sophisticated Comedy!

COLOR C STAMING T GYOUNG
AUDIEYMEADOWS
A UNIYERSA.4NTERNAT1pNAL RELEASEIl
Shows at 1, 3, 5,7 and, 9 P.M.

AIR CONDITIONED
4 ยง NOW!
"ONE OF THE THREE GREATEST FRENCH1

.i

"A powerful and absorbing drama. . . A forcefulness and sense

SHOWS TONIGHT
at
7:00 and 9:00 P.M.
FILMS.

of truth that are tremendous."

-New York Post

Excellent...persistently comic,
Iangig from wryly ironic to

Wednesday through Saturday, July 11-14

I

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