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June 29, 1962 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1962-06-29

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{

U b r 0 gan Paiu
Seventy-Second Year
EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
"Where Opnin Are - re STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG.. ANN ARBOR, MIcH. * Phone NO 2-3241
Truth Will Prevai"
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1962 NIGHT EDITOR: DENISE WACKER
Court's Obscenity Decision
Skirts Essential Issues
THE SUPREME COURT'S decision on obscen- to banning if its dominant theme appeals to
ity is both a success and a failure. The Court the "prurient interest" of "the average person."
has moved in the right direction, but has failed Assuming this to be so, Justice Harlan said
that there is another test for obscenity: the
to articulate an adequate rationale for this material involved must be "patently offensive,"
move, regardless of its effect. To be obscene, Justice
The case centered around a Post Office or- Harlan said, the items must be "so offensive on
der banning from the mails three magazines their face as to affront current community
designed to appeal to homosexuals. The Court standards of decency" and indecency must be
self -demonstrating. " By these standards he
reversed this order in a 6-1 decision. found the magazines not obscene.
Justice John Marshall Harlan announced the
judgment of the Court, but his opinion was TO THE EXTENT that this kind of a test
joined only by Justice Potters Stewart. Justice makes it more difficult for the Post Office
Harlan's argument seems peripheral, and it is to censor the mails, to this extent Justice Har-
little wonder then that only one other justice lan's new test for obscenity improves the situa-
joined him. tion.
But Justice Harlan came closer to touching
HE SAID that the three magazines involved the basic issue when he said he could not at-
consist largely of photographs of nude and tribute to Congress, in the statute aimed at ob-
near-nude male models and give the names of scene mail, "any such quixotic and deadening
each model and the photographer together with purpose as would bar from the mails all ma-
the address of the latter, and that they also terial, not patently offensive, which stimulates
contain advertisements for nude photographs. impure desires relating to sex."
Justice Harlan referred to a 1957 Court de- A concurring opinion by Justice William J.
cision on obscenity. The Court held then that Brennan Jr., joined by Chief Justice Earl War-
material is obscene and constitutionally liable ren and Justice William O. Douglas, also came
close to touching the basic issue. Justice Bren-
nan argued that Congress has simply not au-
Cl(( to R ionthorized the Post Office to exclude obscene
C all toeligion material from the mails by an administrative
proceeding.
T HE SUPREME COURT took a necessary'and
courageous step when it outlawed prayers in THE GREAT DISAPPOINTMENT in this
public school classrooms. By its action, the case is the failure of the Court's two fore-
court protected religious liberty by further most libertarians-Justice Douglas and Justice
removing the prestige of the state from be- Hugo L. Black-to discuss the basic issue. Jus-
hind any one concept. tice Black concurred without opinion "in the
Justice Black, in his opinion, stated the result"-the setting aside of the postal ban.
issue well, "When the power, prestige and The basic issue that the two majority opin
financial support of government is placed be- ions skirted and that Justice Black failed to
hind a particular religious belief, the indirect discuss is the existence of any ban at all for
coercive pressures upon religious minorities to reasons of obscenity.
conform to the prevailing officially approved The first article of the Bill of Rights states
religion is plain "lthat "Congress shall make no law ... abridg-
ing the freedom of speech, or of the press.."
The meaning of this decision is clear when Like Justice Black, we may understand this ar-
children of minority religioned parents are ticle to mean what the words say. The mandate
concerned. These young individuals are not yet seems explicit; it does not add, "except in cases
articulate, enough to withstand the pressures, of obscenity."
however bland, of the majority religion. They
grow up confused between the principles of THE OPPOSITE ARGUMENT is that society
their parents and the necessarily ill-defined must protect itself from the obscene and
ones of the state. Therefore, they may not that (in the dissenting words of Justice Tom C.
be able to form their own moral system or Clark) the Post Office should not be required to
coherently consider others. be "the world's largest disseminator of smut."
Yet who shall decide what is smut and what
BLIND TO THIS EFFECT of public school is obscene? Are there some men who are so
prayers, the powerful critics of the Supreme nearly infallible that they can, by prior censor-
Court also fail to see the decision enhances ship, set themselves up as judges of what is ap-
American religiousity. As the result of previous propriate for the rest of us to read and of
court cases, the state religion, as taught in what is not appropriate for the rest of us to
public schools, is the lowest common demon- read?
inator of all beliefs. This has created a bland
cliched Judeo-Christianity that is devoid of ITFOLLOWS that the ideal that we should
spiritual meaning. The decision challenges seek to achieve is self-censorship: let an in-
America's various religions to inspire their dividual decide for himself what he shall read.
children and teach them meaningful moral To remove this choice from an individual is
values, for the public schools are forbidden. to anti-democratic, for not only would it violate
do so. It is a tocsin to religions to save them- the words and the spirit of the First Amend-
selves from the ever-increasing encroachment ment but it would also violate the foundation of
of secular values. s ddemocratic decision-making: individual liberty.
The critical religious leaders should not be Democracy rests upon a confidence in the
critical of the Supreme Court, but thankful people. There is no trust in the people to be
for the court's challenging of their lethargy, found in a Post Office ban.
-PHILIP SUTIN -ROBERT SELWA
TODAY AND TOMORROW:

European Cooperation

"Nice Kitty Can't Come In?"

DETROIT SUMMER THEATRE:
'Come Blow Your Horn'
Proves Delightful Show
"COME BLOW YOUR HORN," after over 500 performances on
Broadway, ran its laugh a minute course for the first time ir.
Michigan last Tuesday evening at the Fisher Theatre in Detroit.
The stars-Keefe Brasselle ("The Eddie Cantor Story"), Fred
Clark (Burns and Allen's "neighbor"), and Benay Venuta (a trooper
beginning with "The Big Parade")-are technically perfect and earn
each laugh with studied precision. Unfortunately, they lack a genuine
feeling for their characters which could lift the play from mere
sophisticated patter to the real talk of people in a natural life situation.
Without such a natural feeling toward their character, no groups of
actors can get close to their audience.
For example, Fred Clark chose to ignore the obvious Yiddish
accent which could add a unique, charming quality to his blustery
father. Considering the various audiences to which this company will
play, this may be a wise decision (although no one in the hinterland
ever had difficulty understanding or identifying with Molly Goldberg).
But, for the sake of the play, the father should have some endearing
characteristic so that at the resolution when father forgives all and
all forgive father there would be a feeling of tenderness.
SIMILARLY, Keefe Brasselle leaps on furniture and twists his
body into unbelievable positions to earn laughs. However, while defin-
itely earning the laughs, he sacrifices the interest the audience might
have had in the son's relationship to the father. Who cares if a
buffoon and a tornado can reach an understanding?
While the more seasoned actors preferred cold craftmanship to
honest human reactions, the young new-comer, Anthony Roberts, was
intensely real and intimately understandable as a 21 year old who
runs eight blocks away from home to live in his brother's bachelor
apartment. Anthony Roberts jumped, clowed, and cha-chaed vigorously
all over the stage-as any young man getting his first taste of
freedom would do. He questioned his brother's values, thwarted his
mother's attempts to feed him a well-rounded diet, and escaped his
father's tyranny not as if he were acting out funny scenes but as
if he were meeting each situation head-on without premediated stances
or gestures.
Anthony Roberts earned the biggest laughs of the evening. It is
far easier to identify with a befuddled young man than a calculating
actor.
* * * *
ASIDE FROM THIS consideration of differing acting emphases,
"Come Blow Your Horn" provides delightful entertainment.
And, for a change, it looks as though University students will be
able to get tickets without planning a month ahead. In spite of the
fact that Tuesday was opening night, there were a few empty seats.
Detroiters have not been enthusiastic in their support of summer
entertainment. The Ringling Brothers and Barnum Bailey Circus lost
money with an opening night audience of 300 paying customers.
Perhaps past performances could explain this coolness in one or two In-
stances of companies playing in Detroit, but the phenomenon has been
extended into all varieties of entertainments.
Even Bobby Darin viewed 3,000 vacant seats at his Masonic
Auditorium one-night-only concert. Therefore, if you are looking for
a refreshing "night on the town," tickets for "Come Blow Your Horn"
should be available at the Fisher Theatre through July 14.
-Milan Stitt
AT THE STATE:
'Hobbs' Pleases No One
"MR. HOBBS TAKES A VACATION" is guaranteed safe for the en-
tire family. It is in color and definitely will not offend-or enter-
tain.
Producer Jerry Wald rounded up a perfect cast for a light suinimer
commedy-or two light summer comedies-or three light summer come-
dies. If one does not blink, he will see Reginald Gardiner flash across
the screen, John McIver get drunk, Fabian sing one second-rate Henry

t I

t1

'I

t

ON THE ROAD:
The NewAmerican Cinema

By MARK SLOBIN
Daily Correspondent
CAMBRIDGE-The film "With-
out Each Other," which just
won the award for New Ameri-
can Cinema at the Boston Inter-
national Film Festival and pre-
viously receiving similar awards at
Cannes, raises some interesting
questions about the nature of the
film as an art medium.
Except for the last two min-
utes - literally - of its action,
"Without Each Other" could stand
as a prototype of the Hollywood
movie. With music by Dimitri Ti-
omkin, filmed in Technicolor,
stocked with a cast that looks and
acts like good Hollywood actors
should, and loaded with a script
that comes straight out of good old
Americana, no film critic could
have predicted that this movie
would be cited for "outstanding
contributions to cinematography."
Yet it was.
AS I SEE IT, the problem here
is a confusion of two levels of
film-making. On one level, the
film is supposed to be a medium
of art, which means that it ought
to contribute to the general
aesthetic experience of the observ-
er, and should be able to be ap-
preciated strictly as a work of art,
without regard to content, just as
a piece of music or a painting.
On the other hand, the film is
also serving the function of a
carrier of messages, particularly
messages of social import. This
social interest of the movies dates
back to many early protest films,
which served merely to carry pro-
test and made no claim to having
aesthetic appeal. Yet to my mind,
unless a movie with'a message
combines the two functions here
described, it does not come off.
TO SAY that we have appreci-
ated many films of Ingmar Berg-
man in the past few years would
certainly be an understatement;
many of these films do not claim
to aim at a social message. If they
have a message, it lies in other
areas of human experience.
It is possible to enjoy a Bergman
film purely as an aesthetic experi-

ence without agreeing with the
message its creator is attempting
to convey, and certainly acceptance
of the message is aided by, or im-
plies, involvement of some sort
with the aesthetic side of the film.
It is as works of art that we ap-
preciate these films.
Similarly, those films of social
content which have been effective
have been those-like "Bicycle
Thief"-which have made their
point through the aesthetic-emo-
tional impact created by the at-
mosphere of the film. In short, the
message is not enough; one re-
quires of a film that it be more
than a .leaflet urging a;..certain
position.
"WITHOUT E A C H OTHER"
seems merely a leaflet. Basically,

the message is similar to that of
"Bicycle Thief" in that the idea
that justice is not always done is.
part of both movies. Yet due to its
failure to do more than merely
state this message briefly at the
conclusion, "Without Each Other"
doesn't come off.
At the conclusion of a highly
incredible plot, which climaxes in
the last two minutes, the action
can move one of two ways: towards
the traditional Hollywood immer-
sion in love, justice, and the fade-
out, or away from the conventional
ending. The director of this film
chose the latter course, and by
doing so, enlisted himself in the
New American Cinema and won
some prizes; I do not believe that
by so doing he created a lasting
work of art.

I

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR:
Defends Billy Graham

To the Editor:
CITY EDITOR Michael Harrah
has made some clear surface
observations of the recent Billy
Graham Crusade in Chicago, but
surfaces frequently belie that
which is unseen beneath. -
Let's look at money first, since
our materialistic natures are sen-
sitive to this. Any culture which
rises to a division of labor incor-
porating religious personnel grants
them support. As soon as the 12
tribes of Israel were established,
one (the Levites) was set aside for
religious duties and was supported
by the other tribes.
The principle of group support
carries right through the history
of Judeo-Christianity (and poli-
tics). Enough people have seen
value in the Graham Crusades to
support them financially. (Other-
wise this service would not exist.)
CONCERNING the "Spiritual
Survival Kits"-we do not give
money to the Tuberculosis Asso-
ciation to buy Christmas seals, but
if I were going to receive some-

thing as a compliment, I think a
group of carefully selected Scrip-
ture verses would do me more good
than some sticky pices of paper.
Besides, a real intelligent fella
named Jesus Christ essentially
made use of the "Spiritual Sur-
vival Kit" (I don't care for the
name either) in a well-known
pinch He had with the Adversary.
Incidently,- the salvation doesn't
cost money and the only facilitat-
ing Billy Graham does is like
that which a doctor does for a
broken arm. Under socialized
medicine a doctor's support would
be more similar to Graham's fi-
nancial support.
There is no doubt that the
name "Billy Graham" is a drawing
card. Jesus Christ had the same
difficulty. People became overly
attracted to His healin' meetin's
and there was nothing He could
do about it. It was an occupational
hazard. But the means which He
provided for being restored to God
are still being made known to,
masses, and a few people are being
restored.
-Donald Matthews, '62

Mancini ditty, Marie Wilson imi-
tate Bardot and John Saxon in a
tight bathing suit.
Screen writer Nunnally Johnson
("How to Marry a Millionaire") is
usually adept at maneuvering large
casts of stars in an entertaining,
coherent show. However, his epi-
sodic screenplay is held together
only because the participants are
somehow or other related to father
James Stewart (Mr. Hobbs) and
mother Maureen O'Hara.
* * *
IT IS INEVITABLE that with
so much talent there should be
a few delightful moments. Lauri
Peters, making her screen debut
after her success in "The Sound
of Music," screws up her face
whenever a boy appears so that her
sparkling new braces will not
show. Unfortunately, she only has
an opportunity to do this a couple
of times before Fabian saves the
day, and Lauri is relegated to
crowd scenes.
Rushing to the next episode,
James Stewart takes junior on a
wildly dangerous sailboat ride.
With the two humorous scenes
over, the show settles down to ser-
ious boredom while bumbling Mr.
Hobbs solves the problems of
everyone-except the viewer who
wants to be entertained.
-Milan Stitt

DAILY OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m., two days preceding
publication.
FRIDAY, JUNE 29
General Notices
Staff Parking Permits-The expiration
date on all 1961-1962 Staff Permits has
been extended one week, through July
7, 1962. New permits are available in
1053 Admin. Bldg.
Language Exam for Masters Degree in
History: July 6, 4:00-5:00 p.m. 411 Mason
Hall. Dictionaries may be used. Sign
the list posted in the History Office,
3601 Haven Hall.
History Make-up Examinations will
be held Sat., July 7, 9-12 a.m. in 429
Mason Hall. Please consult your in-
structor and then sign the list in the
History Office, 3601 Haven Hall.
Events Saturday
Faculty Recital: Ralph Herbert, bari-
tone, will presents Schubert's Die Win-
terreise in recital on Sat., June 30, 8:30
p.m. in Rackham Lecture Hall. Eugene
(Continued on Page 3)

By WALTER LIPPMANN
THERE HAS NOW taken place what is cer-
tainly a most important, and it may be a
decisive, turn for the better in the complicated
pai'allel negotiations about the European Eco-
nomic Community and the American nuclear
deterrent. This is the Joint Declaration of
June 26 of the Action Committee for the
United States of Europe, of which the head is
M. Jean Monnet.
The committee has now spoken out un-
equivocally in favor of British membership in
the European Economic Community.
T HE POSITION taken by M. Monnet's Action
Committee will command warn support in
this country. The adherence of Great Britain
to the European Economic Community is in-
dispensable if the hope of a great libera;
trading area is to be realized.
For if Great Britain and the Scandinavian
countries and the European neutrals and the
Commonwealth are all outside the Common,
Market, and in rivalry with it, it will be.
presumptuous of the Six to call themselves
"Europe," and there will be little prospect of
a partnership between Europe and the United
States.
Equally, we shall give our full support to
the idea of a "new partnership of Europe and
America" in the field of defense and nuclear
weapons. Our argument with Gen. de Gaulle
is about a separate, independently operated
French nuclear deterrent.

practical and patient effort to tackle together
the problems they have in common."
If we explore the unsolved problems of how
to work out a relationship of two separate but
equally powerful entities, we may ask first:
Is it possible for either of these equally
powerful entities to wage nuclear war separ-
ately. The American answer would be "no."
THUS, if the Soviet Union launched an all-
out attack against Western Europe, it would
collide first of all with the large American
army in Europe. It would be impossible for
the United States to sit still and do nothing.
In reverse, 'it is no less true that either
Europe or America could engage in a separate
nuclear war anywhere, in Europe, Africa, or,
Asia. Once nuclear war were engaged any-
where, preemptive strikes against hostile nu-
clear forces in being would become imperative.
The conclusion we draw from all this is
that in the world today the.unique and para-
mount mission of nuclear forces is to prevent
the use of nuclear forces. They cannot be used
as instruments of a national policy. In the
American view a nuclear partnership between
Europe and America can be worked out only
if the first principle of the partnership is
that nuclear weapons are for use against
nuclear weapons.
IF THIS is the sound conclusion to be drawn
from the facts of life in the nuclear age, it
is. very likely to prevail in the end. The new
Europe, which the Action Committee is pro-
moting, means to be too strong to invite ag-
gression. But it is not nationalist or militarist

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