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June 29, 1962 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1962-06-29

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FRIDAY, JUNE 29,1962

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE

FRIDAY, JUNE 29, 1962 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE

Stein Clarifies Problems
In Common Market Trade

MORAL QUESTION:
Views Vary on Homosexuality

IFIEUtArW

By MICHAEL SATTINGER
There is emerging in Europe "an
economic power of the first mag-
nitude" which is showing a faster
rate of growth than either the
United States or the Soviet Union.
This "formidable bloc" makes it
imperative that both business and
government soon adopt new poli-
cies.
Using this foundation, Prof. Eric
Stein of the Law School went on
to clarify the problems the United
States faces in Europe in his sec-
ond lecture on "Current Develop-
ments in the European Common
Market," delivered in connection
with the University's third special
summer school for lawyers.
t Crux of the Matter
By far the most serious problem
United States business has is com-
petition with members of the
Common Market within Market
countries.
Companies exporting goods to
the Market from the United States
now pay tariffs which are twice as
high as those on goods from Ger-
many, Prof. Stein pointed out. He
also said that companies face dif-
ficulties with the new patent law
and anti-trust legislation formed
by the ECM.
Furthermore, Prof. Stein added,
"the United States economy is lag-
ging domestically, with an impor-
tant portion of our productive ca-
pacity unused at a time when in-
ternationally we have balanoe of
payments problems and need to
produce and export at an ever-in-
creasing rate.
Flexibility Needed
"Because of Western Europe's
new economic power, its relation-
ship to the United States has
changed."
It is also quite likely that other
countries, notably Great Britain,,
will join the ECM to form an eco-
nomic bloc of more than 300 mil-
lion p oile.
To eskablish a "fruitful relation-
ship," the United States must de-
velop a flexible trade policy to "be

in a position to bargain with the
ECM for a reduction of tariffs."
The Trade Expansion Act, which
was passed in Congress today,
gives the President power to nego-
tiate removal of tariffs on some
items and reciprocal trade agree-
ments on others, and the power to
make available the controversial
trade adjustment assistance.
The trade adjustment assistance
provides widespread means for al-
leviating the problems of indus-
tries and workers hit hard by low-
ered tariffs.
Prof. Stein explained recent de-
velopments within the ECM which
would allow foreign competition
from fellow Market countries, free
removal of capital from one coun-
try to another, and free movement
of workers.
"New forms of cooperation may
have to be devised if we are to find
sensible solutions," Prof. Stein
said.
The United States must try to
improve productivity, increase re-
search and development, and show
restraint in price raises, Prof.
Stein said. He added that the
United States should also attempt
to improve European understand-
ing of our economic situation.
N1ame Bursley
To Tax Group
Rep. Gilbert Bursley (R-Ann
Arbor) has been named to a House
interim committee which will
study state tax proposals.
The committee, established by
a resolution introduced by Burs-
ley, will function between legisla-
tive sessions and will make recom-
mendations for improving the
state's tax structure.
Other members include: Rep.
Rollo G. Conlin (R-Tipton), Rep.
Russell R. Strange (R-Clare),
Rep. Hugh Smale (D-Detroit), and
Rep. Hiram McNeeley (D-Inkster).

V'

(Continued from Page 1)

Vice-President for Academic Af-
fairs Roger W. Heyns, however,
stressed the concern for the in-
dividual convicted for "gross in-
decency."
"It's a real tragedy when this
sort of thing occurs and there
cannot be a standing rule about
the treatment we give a con-
victed homosexual," Heyns said.
"Whether or not he's asked to
leave depends upon the case and
upon the circumstances. There is
no automatic dismissal.
Like Any Felony
"Every felony, not just 'gross
indecency' is handled this way.
But some felonies are more serious
than others and homosexuality is
considered to be very serious in-
deed," he added.
Heyns also indicated that the
nature of homosexuality, not the
nature of the law making it a
felony, is the reason for dis-
missal action. "Certainly these
people need all the help they can
get, but we have to think about
protecting people with incipient
tendencies as best we can, and
often this entails dismissal.
"However, we don't just throw
faculty members into the street;
rather we seek to get them po-
sitions elsewhere," Heyns said.
Most of these "positions" are out-
side education.
Less Severe Treatment
Generally students convicted of
homosexualiy are given much less
severe treatment than faculty
members. The students are sus-
pended until such time as they
present verification (a note from
a psychiatrist) vouching that they
are good social risks..
Administrators explained that
this is because a certain amount of
experimentation is quite normal,
but that homosexuality in adults
is more serious and more advanced
and thus requires stronger con-
trolling measures.
The opinions of individuals less
involved with the University or who

dealt with homosexuals are gen-
erally much more tolerant of them
than those expressed by University
administrators, or by the police.
Psychiatrist's Opinion
A psychiatrist, many of whose
patients have been homosexuals,
and who has workedwith several
of the men arrested and later
found guilty of "gross indecency,"
views the problem in terms of
long-range good and evil.
"The real focus of the question
is whether or not this police
maneuver will do any good for
the community. And I rather tend
to think not.
"Moreover, these arrests and the
public trials have been absolutely
devastating to some of these men.
They've been ruined forever by the
police work and publicity," he said.
Vague Question
He also cited the medical ques-
tion of homosexuality, a rather
vague question, he said, since the
problem differs greatly from indi-
vidual to individual.
"There are many kinds of peo-
ple caught by the police. Some had
never practiced it before, from
what we can tell. Others, of course,
have been active homosexuals for
quite a while.
"In none of these cases will their
activity be modified or curtailed
by legal punishment."
He also said it was likely that
many of the adolescents arrested
last May are not confirmed homo-
sexuals - that they probably
wouldn't become confirmed homo-
sexuals, and that, in all likeli-
hood, they were engaging in "ex-
perimentation" quite normal at
some stages of adolescence, and
it was only through freak chance
that they were caught.
No Medical Basis
"The law says that homosexuals
at large can convert others-there
is no psychological background for
this; there is only legal back-
ground. Granted that some men
are sucked in as a result of these
activities, it's not just from one
experience in a Union 'john'; rath
er, it's from their childhood ex-
periences."
He also said that everyone has
engaged in some sort of homo-
sexual activities, and that, to some
extent, homosexual relationships
are necessary to insure that normal
heterosexual relationships be suc-
cessful.
"Boys and girls in sorority and
fraternity houses discuss their sex-
ual experiences and excite each
other-there's nothing abnormal
about this. It is a part of the edu-
cational process."
Arrest Least Guilty
He asserted that the police often
arrest those who deserve it least,
since long-time practicing homo-
sexuals are rarely apprehended.
"However, I think that most
homosexuals could spot a police
officer--unless the officer acted
as a homosexual would. With this
in mind, I feel that entrapment
was very definitely used," he said.
He also felt that the residence
hall system may quite definitely
promote homosexual activity.
"In any culture which bars nor-
PLEASE DON'T EAT
THE DAISIES
Starring DORIS DAY
MURDER SHE SAID
MARGARET RUTH EFORD
.BILLIARDS
and
SWIMMING

mal heterosexual relationships, ex-
cept through marriage, as ours
does, there's bound to be homo-
sexuality. It's almost a physiologi-
cal necessity. And where contacts
are restricted, the incidence of
homosexuality quite definitely goes
up."
Women Uninvestigated
Although the police have never
held surveillance on women's lav-
atories, because, Krasny said, of
a lack of complaints, the psychia-
trist asserted that it's likely that
there is more homosexuality
among women than men.
"The whole problem is that most
people are so afraid of homosex-
uality, without knowing just what
it is, that they'd rather have puni-
tive measures than anything else,"
he said.
Another man deeply concerned
about the homosexual problem,
John W. Conlin, Jr., a defense at-
torney for some of the alleged
homosexual offenders, also said
that entrapment which occurs
when a police officer attempts to
initiate criminal action may oc-
cur.
Perhaps No Crime
"If entrapment exists, no crime
was committed," he said.
Defending arrested homosexuals
two years ago, Conlin and other
members of his firm charged that
police had used entrapment. How-
ever, Judge James Breakey threw
that charge, as well as charges
that the offenders made no overt
attempt and that the statute was
unconstitutional, out of court.
The trials for all of the 30 ar-
rested last May have not yet been
concluded. Over half the accused
have already appeared in court-
almost all pleaded guilty. In all
probability they will be given a
two to five year probationary term
as well as charged court expenses
and a fine in excess of $250.
Everyone spoken to for this ar-
ticle agreed that it was a pity that
so many lives had to be ruined to
protect society as a whole. And
everyone felt that a better way to
handle the situation can be found.
But there were no confident solu-
tions offered and it will likely be
only a matter of time before the
next thirty men are arrested and
charged with "gross indecency."
Graduate Student
To Present Recital
Richard Kretchman, Grad, un-
der the auspices of the music
school, will present a doctoral re-
cital at 8:30 p.m. today in the
Lane Hall Aud. Kretchman, a bar-
itone, will present several musical
selections.
}DOM I N I CK'S
PIZZAS-SUBS
812 Monroe
WE DELIVER
NO 2-5414
YI

USED CARS
FOR SALE-1960 VOLVO; radio, heater,
whitewalls, four - speed. Excellent
shape. Phone 479-7436. B&
FOR SALE
PORTABLE TYPEWRITER, 1958 Royal;
Harmony Guitar; Argus 35mm. camera
with flash. NO 5-4018 after 6. B3
FOR SALE-Jazz-wide selection; also
classical, folk records and paperbacks
-all very cheap. Phone 2-4226. B4
DIAMONDS-Wholesale from our mines
to you. Buy direct and save. Robert
Haack Diamond Importers, 504 First
National Bldg. NO 3-0653. B5
HELP WANTED
LOVELY JOB for month of July. 1 or
2 girls, 18 or over. In North Point,
Northern Mich. as mothers helpers.
Must be able to swim and drive. $35
a week and transportation. Call NO
3-3117. H2
COLLEGE MEN
Part time help-17 hours per week.
Summer school student preferred.
Working schedule will be arranged to
fit class and study schedule if neces-
sary.
Salary offered-$50 per week.
Call Mr. Miller, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
662-9311. H1
PERSONAL
CRAW,why must you be such a slave
driver. The helpless one. F4
GET into the swing of things. Order
your summer Daily nowi!1 Call 662-
3241. B2
RECORD CLUB needs members. We
spend the evening in dark rooms list-
ening to records. Meet at Engin Arch
evenings at9:30, bring date and rec-
ords. F3
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
TIRE SALE
Get our price before you buy! Life-
time guarantee. No money down. Up
to one year to pay. Specializing in
brake service and motor tune-ups.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Main at Catherine NO 8-7717
S3
TRANSPORTATION

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.40 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words to a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. daily
Phone NO 2-4786
MISCELLANEOUS
DO YOU FEEL LOST at college? Do you
feel out of it because you don't know
what's going on? Subscribe to the
summer Daily. Only $2.00. Call 662-
3241. M3
BARGAIN CORNER
MEN'S WEAR; SUMMER SPECIALS.
Short sleeve sport shirts $1.25 up;
Wash & wear pants $3.95, 4.95, 5.95;
Briefs or shorts 69c; Canvas casuals
$2.95-3.95. Many other BIG BUYS.
SAM'S STORE, 122 E. Washington St.
W1
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
LAMBRETTA 150cc. scooter. Spare bas-
ket, and clock. NO 3-9542 afternoons.
Z2
FOR SALE-'59 Lambretta 150. Perfect
condition. Many extras, including hel-
met and goggles-$200. Ask for Mr.
Hershberg, Univ. ext. 2048 or 4084
Frieze Bldg. Mon., July 2, 9 a.m. to 4
p.m. Z3
NEED A BIKE!!
If your soles are wearing thin on the
hot summer sidewalks, stop in at
BEAVERS'S BIKE
AND HARDWARE
Ask about Beaver's
BIKE RENTAL
(by the week or month)
Your bike failing?
Beaver can restore it to good health.

FOR RENT
SUMMER APT. for 2 or 3 on campus.
Call NO 8-8601. CS
FOR RENT-Good garage. Near State
and Packard. NO 2-0520 or 917 Mary
Street. C21
FOURTH ROOMMATE WANTED-7-rm.
apt., 2 refrigerators, TV, parking. Call
3-1511, Ext. 3096 till 5. Peter. 016
FOR RENT-Campus four room apt.
Summer price $60. Phone NO 3-4322.
C19
FOR RENT-2 bdrm. unfurnished house.
Utility room-screened porch. $115 per
month. Call NO 5-6772. 014
PARKING SPACE behind Campus The-
atre. $5.50 per month. Call NO 3-4322.
013
SUMMER APT. FOR 2-% block from
Law Club. Call NO 3-0150, ask for
Rich. 015
1 APT. FOR SUMMER for 2 or 3 stu-
dents-all furnished and utilities paid.
Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. C11
APT. ON HILL ST. for 1 or 2 students
for fall-all furnished and utilities
paid. Call NO 8-9538 or 2-3512. 010

2 BEDROOM FURNISHED HOUSE-O11
heat included. Suitable for 3 to study.
$115. NO 5-1151. C9
Summer Rates
Furnished apts. from $60 up. NO
5-9405. C20
SUMMER RENTALS available now. De-
luxe furnished apartments at summer
prices. Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor.
NO 3-0511. C1
FOR RENT FOR SUMMER-2 single
furnished rooms for boys. Share kit-
chen and bath with 2 others. Packard
corner of Vaughn. Call NO 8-8912 after
5:30. C18
NEW twc- bedroom apartment units now
being completed on South Forest for
Sept. occupancy. For appoint, to see,
call Karl D. Malcolm, Jr. Realtor
NO 3-0511. 02
SUBLET immediately for summer. Two
bedrm.. cool basement apt. Recently
redecorated, very comfortable, good
location, reduced price. Call 665-8944
evenings or 663-1511, ext. 277 days.
Ask for Bev. 04
1 GIRL wanted to share apt. with 2
other girls for summer or perm. New-
ly redecorated with carpeting & wood
panelling. Close to hospital & cam-
pus. $50 per mo. per, person. Phone,
NO 5-5364 after 5:30 p.m.
NEW APARTMENTS
Now renting for summer occupancy
2- and 3-bedroom furnished apts. at
1000 Oakland. Paneled living room,
carpeted throughout, modern furni-
ture, from $200. Call Don Chisholm,
NO 5-9114.
RBOR
CIATES,
REALTORS
1829 W. Stadium at Pauline NO 5-9114
0l3

605 Church

zi

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
"MY, r~ , " N .:.... 4,..,. ...t. 4! S, .:''" : ?"?' ?:' : . t.

Avii-.4

(Continued from Page 2) j

Bossart, pianist, will accompany.
to the general public.

Open

Placement
The following schools have listed
teaching vacancies for the school year
1962-1963.
Clio, Mich. - 1st grade, 4th grade; Jr.
HS Engl/SS (Woman), Math/Ei.; HS
l Geom/Adv. Gen'l Math, Chem/Math,
W. Hist./Track & Cross Country; Guid.
Director.
Edwardsburg, Mich.-Elem., HS Guid.,
Engl., Math, Libr., Head Varsity Bsktbl.,
Head Varsity Bsebl., Head Varsity Track,
Asst. FtbI. (Above PE fields with Math
r r English Background.
Erie,' Mich. (Mason Cons. Schs.)--
Elem., Art, Voc. Mus.. Sp. Corr.; Jr. HS
Engl., Art, (Gen. Sci/SS, Ind. Arts, HS.
Math, Latin /Span.,Engl/Speech or
Drama or Journalism.
Grand Blanc, Mich. - Elem. (K-6);
Vocal Mus., PE, Secondary Journ., Ind.
Arts, Art, Libr., Spec. Educ., Visit.
Teach., Sp. Corr., School Nurse.
Hamtramck, Mich.-Kdg., Grades 1, 4,
5; Jr. CIS Engl. Math, Gen. Sci., Ment.
Handi.; HSEngl., Math; Elem. &Jr.
HS $p. Corr.
Harper Woods, Mich. - Comm.; 3rd
grade.
gf Madison Heights, Mich. (Lamphere
Pub. Schs.) - Elem. (K-6), Jr. HS
Home Ec., Math, Girl's PE, Core Engl/
SS, Voc. Mus., Educable Ment. Retard.;
HS Girl's Couns, Boy's Couns., Educable
Ment. Retard., Math/Engl.
Manchester, Mich - 4th & 5th grade
(15 min. from Ann Arbor); 6th grade;
Jr. HS Lang/SS core and 7th & 8th
gr. Girl's PE (PE minor not required);
HS Phys/Chem/Alg. 1, Comm.
For additional information, contact
the Bureau of Appointments, 3200 SAB,
663-1511, Ext. 3547.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Local Radio Station-Receptionist-
Typing, general office skills. Handling
telephone, preparation of station logs.
Shorthand not necessary. Exper. not
necessary. Age 19-early 20's.
Dow Chemical Co., Midland, Mich. -
Medical Technologists for openings in
Toxicology Sect. of Biochemical Research
Lab. & Animal Sdi. Sect. of Agricultural
Chemical Research Lab. Prefer women,
but will consider men.
W. R. Grace & Co., Clarksville, Md.-
Current openings as follows: BS for
Analytical Chemists, Plastics Develop-
ment Engnr., & Reference Librarian
(chem. major.); PhD for Inorganic or
Physical-Inorganic Chemists, Physical
or Physical-Organic Chemist, Informa-
tion Center Head (chem. major) & Lit-
erature Scientist (chem. major).
Southern Oakland Girl Scouts, Inc.,
Berkley, Mich - (1) District Advisor-
Camp Director. BA with emphasis on
broad liberal arts curriculum. MA So-
cial Work or related field. Group lead-
ership exper. Exper. in camp admin.
Age 25 & up. (2) Ass't. Exec. Director.
MA Social Work or allied field. Super-
visory & admin .exper.
National Cash Register Co., Dayton,
Ohio - Junior Information Analyst -
BS or MS in Library Science with 0-2
yrs. exper. Position in Research & Dev.
Tech. Information Center. Will perform
tech. literature searches. Will gather
& index material primarily of electronic
or mech. nature.
Detroit Public Schols, Detroit, Mich.
-Programmer-Data Processing. Candi-
dates who have had training & exper.
in program work with IBM 1401 Elec-
tronic Computer. For further informa-
tion go to Engrg. Placement at 128-W.
Engrg.
Fruehauf Trailer Co., Detroit, Mich. -
Experienced Engnrs. for positions as
follows: Chief Production Liaison Engr;
Mgr. - International Engrg. & Mfg.
Liaison; Tooling Dev. Engnr; Project &
Design Engnrs. Also position as Patent
Attorney.
Great Central Insurance Co., Lansing,
Minh- - Sales ,,Agent - ~College degre

business very helpful but not essential.
Age 25-40. On-the-job trng. Will handle
crime protection insurance. Opening in
Ann Arbor, Flint, Detroit, Lansing &
Grand Rapids.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications for these jobs
can be made in the Part-time Place-
ment Office, 2200 SAB Monday thru
Friday 8 a.m. til 12 noon and 1:30 til
5 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring students
for part-time, or full-time temporary
work, should contact Bob Hodges, at
NO 3-1511, ext. 3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous odd
jobs should consult the bulletin board
in Room 2200, daily.

MALE
--Several students to sell summer
and/or fall-winter-spring University
Players season tickets on a com-
mission basis.
-Several students to sell subscriptions
to the Michigan Daily on a com-
mission basis.
3-Engineering students to do main-
tenance in exchange for an apart-
ment on campus.
FEMALE
1-To sell ladies ready-to-wear. Must
be over 21 years of age and exper-
ienced. Full-time, permanent posi-
tion.
1-To cook for one person and live in.
Bus runs by house.
-Several students to sell summer and/
or fall - winter - spring University
Players season tickets on a com-
mission basis.
-Several students to sell subscrip-
tions to the Michigan Daily on a
commission basis.
1-Student companion for 17 year old
blind girl. Must live in dorm. For
fall semester.

Call NO 3-4156
Special weekend rates from 5 p.m.
Friday till 9 a.m. Monday . .
$15.00 plus 9c a mile. Rates
include gas, oil, insurance.
514 E. WASHINGTON ST.
GI
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
BEDROOM SIZE TV
8" Portable $129.00
Miniature Tape Recorder
all battery
70 mins. recording $99.00
Service & Repairs
Free pickup & delivery
NO 5-8607
Hi Fi & TV Center
next to Hill Aud. on Thayer St.
X2

BUSINESS SERVICES
HAVE A PICNIC!
BEAT THE HEAT!
Cold Watermelons
Cold Pop
Fresh Fruit
Hot Barbequed Chickens
Hot Barbequed Ribs
at
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night 'til 12 Ja
Read and Use
Daily Classifieds

I

MIXER
THE NEWMAN CLUB
invites you to attend
a mixer on Friday,
June 29at8:00 P.M.
ADMISSION FREE
331 Thompson St.

AIR CONDITIONED
BOWLING..
1 :00 P.M. - 11:00 P.M.
daily except Sunday
at the
MICHIGAN UNION

...

I

UPROARIOUS, ROMANTIC

U 4

ACCOUNTING
TYPING
SPEED WRITING
GREGG SHORTHAND
BUSINESS MATHEMATICS
Complete Courses or a single subject
Founded 1915
Hamilton Business College
State and Williams Phone NO 8-7831

I

daily except Sun.

at the
MICHIGAN UNION

I

i

I

111116118 (~f111COOL
DIAL 2-6264
m RRY WALD'S production of
Mr. HOB TaEM
a9 VAO7MQ

I

I

AIR-CONDITIONED

DIAL 8-6416

The love offoirs
of three women-
moritol... premoritol...

NOW!

and one morvelous-surprise!
Three wonderful stories by
' INGMAR BERGMAN

/1
rIi,
-..

'A~i'(1.4
9
p.r.~

I

::!:

.I- I-'

I '"IlL = Wmw" ma I

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