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July 14, 1961 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-14

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FRIDAY, JULY 14, 1961
Detroit Hosts
Conference
Top experts on space and mili-
tary affairs have gathered in De-
troit for a four-day air, space
conference at Cobo Hall.
Vice-Adm. W. F. Raborn, known
as the "father" of the Polaris
missile submarines will be the first
to appear on the program.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

tlAriv fi ID@IP

4 s Y~A(.Pi HRE

JOINT EFFORT:
Survey To Develop City Master Plan

Kauper Traces 'Nationalization of Right'

By DAVID MARCUS
The Ann Arbor Planning De-
partment and Chamber of Com-
merce are going to undertake a
survey that will eventually lead to
an Ann Arbor master plan for the
redevelopment and future con-
struction of commercial facilities.
Headed by Donald K. Strohmey-
er, the study is being jointly un-
dertaken to determine what can
be done to revitalize the Central
Business District.
Project Needs
"We hope to project the uses
and needs of various areas into
the next 20 years," City Planner
Richard Leary said.
The project will also evaluate
other shopping areas in the city

DIAL
2-8264

including those serving the Uni-
versity.
T'he plan will be divided into
three sections covering traffic
problems above and beyond those
handled by the Ann Arbor traffic
engineer, design to cover questions
relating to any architectural de-
signing which the planning might
require and an economic division
to deal with problems of merch-
ants and the general economic
prospects for the area.
Extensive Use
Ann Arbor merchant Paul Wag-
ner, who heads the Chamber of
Commerce committee on this proj-
ect which is presently raising half
of the $42,000 to be spent on it,
commented that the survey would
make extensive use of members of
the land planning department.
"We want people to think when
the survey is done that they have
created enough of it themselves
so that we don't have to devise a
Cafe Promeihean
-- 508 E. William
LADIES
NITE
FRIDAY, JULY 14
9:30 P.M.--1 2:30 A.M.
all women with escorts
admitted FREE
SENSATIONAL
SHOW
5th WEEK
VOCALIST
AGNES WHEELER
with
JOE ROBINSON
at the PIANO
Adm. 75c
SAT., JULY 15
Jazz Duo
featuring
ANDY ANDERSON
9 P.M.-12:30A.M.

plan and then have to go out and
sell it to the people all over
again," he said.
"Many plans have been devised
by outsiders and then rejected by
the community. We don't want
that to happen here."
Some Unenthusiastic
He noted that although he
found most business men enthu-
siastic, some were unenthusiastic
about a plan.
Wagner cited the basis of the
plan in a survey made earlier by
an outside firm which recom-
mended that Ann Arbor create a
master plan as a first step toward
redevelopment and growth of fa-
cilities.
The University is working with
the study through its representa-
tive on the city planning commis-
sion, David S. Pollock of the Uni-
versity relations department.
Dean Phillip N. Youtz of the
Architecture and Design School is
also working with the survey.

By EARL POLE
The federal government can be
expected to extend greatly its
power to guarantee freedom and
to insure the "due process of law"
in the future, Prof. Paul G. Kau-
per, of the law school, said yes-
terday.
In his lecture on "The National-
ization of Right," Prof. Kauper
discussed the lasting effects of the
Civil War on Constitutional law,
specifically the 14th amendment.
The 14th amendment, originally
intended to insure the rights of
citizenship to the Negro, lost its
original historical meaning in
later years. It became a basis of
discussion and legislation for all
increases in the power of the fed-
eral government to guarantee "due
processes of law" to the citizens
over the laws of the individual
states.
Limit State Power
The 14th amendment forms the
basis, with relation to the Bill of
Rights, for a practical limitation
of states' powers.
An even further triumph of na-

tionalism over sectionalism °due
to a clause - capable of :very
broad interpretation - prohibiting
the states from passing any law
which interferes with the carrying
out of the "due processes of law"
as guaranteed by the Constitution.
The far-reaching effects of this
law were probably not envisaged
by the people at the time of its
passage, Prof. Kauper said.
Traces Attitudes
Prof. Kauper enumerated the
various attitudes taken by the
Supreme Court on the 14th amend-
ment. At first, he said, the court
took a very conservative view of
the matter, considering "due
process of law" to mean only
those individual. right pertaining
to the federal government.
Later, in other cases, the court
considered the 14th amendment
a practical limitation on the
power of states to interfere with
"due process of law", and still
later, the court became less con-
cerned with formal procedure, as
in the case of California abolish-

PHILIP YOUTZ
... aids commission

- - _.. a

COOL1
"BRAWLING and
EXNILARANT
ABANDON on
the SCREENI"
-Time Magazine W
"A GrEM"
-N.Y: Herald Tribune=f

DIA'
8-6416

ing a grand jury, but with the
overall fairness to the citizenry.
It is this view, which has persisted
to the present day, he said.
Until the mid 1930's, the rights
guaranteed to the citizen under
"due process of law" were re-
garded primarily as economic but
during the mid 1930's, this con-
cept began gradually to change
to the guaranteeing the rights of
free speech, assembly, religion
and other listed in the Bill of
Rights.
Notes Extension
Prof. Kauper noted as especially
significant the extension of "due
processes of law" back to its
original meaning, the guarantee
of rights to the Negro. Under the
old interpretation, he said, segre
gation would be allowable if the
facilities were of equal quality.
With the new concern of the
courts for the overall welfare of
the rights of the citizen under
"due process of law," it has realiz-
ed that segregation gives the Ne-
gro a feeling of inferiority, which
interferes with the relative quality
of the facilities, and therefore
"due processes of law."
'U' Workshops
In Journalism
Aid Students
Thirty-three high school stu-
dents are "covering" the activi-
ties on campus for the next seven
days.
They are reporting for the High
School Journalism Workshop spon-
sored by the University's Journal-
ism department.
This workshop is the first of
three to be held this summer.
The 11-day schedule includes
classes in various areas of journal-
ism. Included are lectures, to be
covered by the students, on Jour-
nalism as well as national topics
and labs in which the students
work on their particular stories.
For recreation, the students will
be attending a picnic, a dance
and a swimming party.
The registration fee for the
workshop is $66 and many of the
students have obtained partial or
full scholarships given by their
high school, school district, or
various commercial newspapers.
The students, usually picked by
their school journalism teacher,
are living in theUniversity dorms.
They are writing- their stories for
a 12-page tabloid that will be
printed and sent to their high
schools at the end of the third
workshop.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time or temporary employes should con-
tact Jack Lardie at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Rm. 2200, daily.
MALE
3-Salesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
50-Psychological subjects, several one
hour experiments.
3-Salesmen, commission basis, must
have car.
2-Experienced plumbers, part-time
summer.
FEMALE
3-Saleswomen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
11-Psychological subjects, one hour to-
tal time.
1-Maid, mostly afternoon work.
4-Telephone solicitors, four hours per
day, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., 1-5 p.m., or 5-9
p.m.

Organization
Notices
Graduate Outing Club, Swimming,
July 16, 1:45 p.m., Rackham Bldg.,
Huron St. Entrance.
* * *
Lutheran Student Association, Semi-
nar "The Lutheran Liturgy," July 14,
8:15 p.m., Student Center, Hill & For-
est.

I

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dundca yMong

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on the Diag, and at the
Student Publications Building

Sot.
9:30-12:30
during DIAL NO 5-6290
July-Aug.
THE HELD
PRICELESS LOOK OVER
$4.00 y2ND BIG WEEK
THE HAPPY
SUMMERTIME
HIT !
WAET
DINo-YI
DONFOYy

UC

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