100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 14, 1961 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, JULY 14, 1961

PAGE FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, JULY 14, 1961

Robinson Paces Reds to 4-3 Win over Cubs

SI11EDSK

By The Associated Press
CINCINNATI-Frank Robinson
brought Cincinnati from behind
_with his 24th home run in the
seventh inning, then drove in the
tie-breaking run in the ninth as
the Reds beat Chicago 4-3 last
night. It was only the fifth victory
for the National League leaders in
13 games with the seventh place
Cubs.
Don Blasingame scored the win-
ning run, beating first baseman
Ed Bouchee's throw to the plate
on Robinson's ground ball. Blasin-.
game had walked and then raced
into third on a single by Vada
Pinson.
The Reds blew a two-run lead
when the Cubs scored twice in the
sixth inning with the help of Pin-
son's error and then went ahead
in the seventh when Bouchee
walked and came around on a
passed ball and a single by Al
Heist.
Robinson, who has driven in 11
runs in the Reds' last four games,
then tied it 3-all with his homer
off losing right-hander Don Card-
well (8-7).
Jim O'Toole was the winner,
beating the Cubs with a four-hit-
ter for an 8-7 record.
* * *
Yanks 6, White Sox 2
CHICAGO-Back-to-back hom-
L is ton .Faces
Commission
PHILADELPHIA (A) - Top
heavyweight contender Charles
(Sonny) Liston goes before the
Pennsylvania Athletic Commis-
sion today to show cause why his
boxing license should not be sus-
pended.
The commission has subpoenaed
six unidentified witnesses to tes-
tify regarding incidents that twice
led to arrests of Liston since May
18. Liston may then, if he chooses,
reply.
Commissioner Al Klein said yes-
terday he couldn't reveal the na-
ture of the expected testimony,
but that Liston is well aware of
what to expect "since he was in-
volved in the two incidents and
he gave us a full, sworn statement
June 21st."
Although the hearing has been
billed as one in which Liston must
show cause, Klein said that by
law, the commission must show
cause to lift a license. Grounds
are actions detrimental to the
sport.
Klein was asked if the commis-
sion was ready to prove a case
and replied "We'll have to see
what develops tomorrow."
On May 18th, Liston was charg-
ed with loitering. A magistrate
dismissed the charge and lectured
the 28-year-old knockout artist.
On June 12th, Liston and a com-
panion, Isaac Cooper, 26, were ar-
rested on several charges. One was
impersonating an officer in forc-
ing a woman to halt her car before
dawn in a lonely section of Fair-
mount Park.

ers by Roger Maris and Mickey
Mantle featured a four-run first
inning rally, lifting the New York
Yankees into the American League
lead on the strength of a 6-2 vic-
tory over the Chicago White Sox.
Maris started the scoring with
a two-run homer which bounced
off the second deck railing. It was
his 34th of the season. Mantle
followed with his 30th homer, a
shot which traveled some 475 feet
and landed in the upper deck in
right center field. It was the 350th
career homer for the mighty Mick.
* * *
Giants 2, Pirates 1
SAN FRANCISCO-Willie Mays
slammed an eighth inning homer
-his 24th of the season-giving
San Francisco a 2-1 victory over
the Pittsburgh Pirates in an ex-
plosive game that saw two Giant
players and a coach thrown out by
the umpires.
Slender Stu Miller, winning
pitcher in Tuesday's All-Star game
here, won his seventh triumph of
the National League campaign. He
hurled the final two innings in re-
lief of Billy O'Dell before 18,245
fans in Candlestick Park.
Third baseman Jimmie Daven-
port, first baseman Willie Mc-
Covery and coach Whitey Lock-
man all were ejected-the latter
two when they bumped into first

base umpire Tony Venzon while
arguing that McCovey had hit a
homer instead of a foul down the
right field line in the seventh.
Mays' homer came off starter
and loser Bob Friend, who is now
9-10. Miller's triumph made his
record 7-2.
* * *
Twins 9, Indians 6
CLEVELAND - Ted Lepcio's
grand slam home run paced the
Minnesota Twins to a 9-6 victory
over the Cleveland Indians.
Jim Lemon and Harmon Kille-
brew also homered for the Twins
and Willie Kirkland drove in two
runs for the Indians with his 15th
homer.
The victory went to Pedro Ra-
mos (6-10), who gave up 10 scat-
tered hits in the 7/3 innings he
worked. The triumph was the first
for Minnesota in six games with
the Indians this season.
Lepcio's blast into the left field
stands was the big blow of a five-
run rally in the first inning. The
runs were unearned because of
an error on an attempted force
play. With two men on base and
two out, Lemon grounded to short-
stop Mike De La Hoz, who threw
wide to second baseman Johnny
Temple. Temple grabbed the ball,
but was unable to tag the base
and the bases were loaded. Jim
Grant then walked Earl Battey to
force in a run, and Lepcio's homer
followed.
Braves 5, Cards 3
ST. LOUIS - Carleton Willey
pitched brilliantly in relief and
Joe Adcock hit a two-run home
run as the Milwaukee Braves
scored a 6-3 victory over the St.
Louis Cardinals.
Willey, now 3-3, took over in
the fifth inning after the Cards
scored one run in the third and
two in the fourth off Tony Clonin-
ger, whittling a five-run Brave
lead to 5-3.
He retired the first six men in
order and was equal to the task
when the Cards threatened in the
seventh. Joe Cunningham hit a
pinch single and stopped at second
on Bob Lillis' single. But Willey
anchored them by setting down
the next three hitters.

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING RATES

LINES
2
3
4

I DAY
.70
.85
1.00

3 DAYS
1.95
2.40
2.85

6 DAYS
3.45
4.20
4.95

Figure 5 average words to a line.
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

RETIRING?-That's the question being asked of Al Lopez, man-
ager of the Chicago White Sox nowadays. A newspaper in his
home town of Tampa, Fla. reported the senor will retire at the
end of this season. Lopez has never had a team finish worse
than third as a major league manager.
AT BRITISH OPEN:
Palmer Penalized;
Behind byStroke

BIRKDALE, England (I')-Ar-
nold Palmer suffered a penalty
stroke yesterday for a seven on
his card and wound up one stroke
behind leaders Dai Rees of Wales
and Harold Henning of South Af-
rica after two rounds of the Brit-
ish Open golf championship.
Forty-eight players with 36 hole

WILLIE MAYS
.. . paces Giant win

Sikes Takes Two More Publinx Matches
To Lead Four Survivors into Semifinals

I

I4)

DETROIT (') - Dick Sikes
shook off the pressure of being
tournament medaist and sloshed
through a steady afternoon rain
yesterday, leading four survivors
into the semifinals of the National
Public Links Golf championship.
After stroking from behind for
a 3 and 2 triumph over Len Piet-
ras of Toledo in the morning
round, the skinny kid from the
Ozark Mountains captured a 3 and
1 quarterfinal victory over Bill
Kelly Jr., Corapolis, Pa.
Sikes, 21, tossed another of his
fantastic putting performances at
Kelley, stocky 27-year-old redhead

i

Major League Standings

1

NATIONAL LEAGUE

W L
Cincinnati 55 30
x-Los Angeles 49 35
Pittsburgh 42 36
San Francisco 45 39
Milwaukee 38 49
St. Louis 36 44-
Chicago 36 45
x-Philadelphia 23 55
x-Playing night game.

Pct.
.647
.583
.538
.536
.487
.450
.444
.295

GB
5%
9%2
16%
17
28%

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Milwaukee 6, St. Louis 3
San Francisco 2, Pittsburgh 1
Cincinnati 4, Chicago 3
Philadelphia at Los Angeles (inc.)
TODAY'S GAMES
Chicago (Ellsworth 4-6) at Cincin-
nati (Jay 12-4) (n)
Milwaukee (Hendley 1-2) at St.
Louis (Brogiio 6-9) (n)
Pittsburgh (Gibbon 7-4) at San
Francisco (Sanford 4-5) (n)
Philadelphia (Owens 1-2) at Los An-
geles (Podres 9-2) (n)

AMERICAN LEAGUE
WN L Pct. GB
New York 54 29 .651 -
Detroit 55 30 .647 -
Baltimore 48 38 .558 7V2
Cleveland 47 40 .540 9
Chicago 42 45 .483 14
Boston 41 45 .477 14!.
Washington 38 46 .452 16Y2~~
Minnesota 35 50 .412 20
Los Angeles 35 51 .407 20Y
Kansas City 31 52 .373 23
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Minnesota 9, Cleveland 6
New York 6, Chicago 2
Boston 3, Baltimore 2
Kansas City at Washington (rain)
Only games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore (Estrada 7-5) at Boston
(Monbouquette 8-7) (n)
Kansas City (Rakow 1-4 and Shaw
5-8) at Washington (McClain 7-7
and Daniels 4-5) (2-n)
Los Angeles (McBride 8-5) at Cleve-
land (Latman 8-0) (n)
Minnesota (Pascual 7-11) at Detroit
(Lary 13-4) (n)
New York (Sheldon 6-2) at Chicago
(Herbert 7-8) (n)

who recently graduated from Trin-'
ity. College (Texas).
Sikes who will be a junior this
fall at the University of Arkan-
sas, had eight one-putt greens
making it 35 one-putters in 98
holes in competition in this event.
He parred every hole on the
front side, but won only one of
them - the third where a bad
chip cost Kelley his par. Kelley
squared the match at the 13th,
getting par. Sikes missedthe par-
3 hole with his tee shot, chipped
up and missed a six-foot putt.
They halved the 14th, but Sikes
strung together three straight one-
putt greens for two birdies and a
par, won all three holes and oust-
ed Kelley.
Meets Schlee
Sikes' opponent in the 36-hole
semifinals today will be John
Schlee, a 22-year-old Memphis
State junior who makes his home
in Seaside, Ore.
Schlee beat Frank Campbell, a
35-year-old reinstated amateur
from Leeds, Ala., who was a run-
nerup for this championship in
1959, 2 and 1 in the quarterfinals.
Schlee had defeated Jay Law of
Harper Woods, Mich., 2 up in the
third round.
Only five of the 17 holes in the
Schlee-Campbell match were halv-
ed. Schlee, 5 over par in his after-
noon victory, survived some shaky
putting on the backside although
he never trailed in his match. He
three-putted three greens, but got
his putter working at the 17th
hole and dropped in a 12-foot
birdie for the winner.

John Molenda, 22-year-old De-
troit Tech college student, won a
pair of sizzling matches and will
meet Lou Gifford, a 40-year-old
navy commander based in Jack-
sonville, Fla. Gifford defeated Mike
Andonian of Pontiac, Mich., 1 up
in the quarterfinals.
After sidelining 1959 titlist Bill
Wright of Seattle 2 up in the
morning, Molenda defeated Bob
Lunn of San Francisco 2 and 1
in his quarterfinal match. Lunn,
only 16, was seeking to become the
second youngest player ever to win
the title in the Public Links
championship's 36-year history.
Two up at the turn, Molenda
increased his margin to 4 when
Lunn three-putted the 10th and
then the youngster's club slippel
out of his hand on No. 11. But the
same thing happened to Molenda
on the next hole, and Lunn again
cut the margin on the 13th with
a beautiful explosion out of a
trap.

scores of 153 and better gained the
final two round payoff stages to-
day over the windswept Birkdale
links.
The rain-soaked course was
hammered during yesterday's play
by howling gale force winds that
sent scores soaring.
Rees ended the first two rounds
with 68-74-142 and the lean,
lanky Henning also carded a 68-
74-142. Palmer, Latrobe, Pa.,-
a man renowned for his clutch
finishes - was breathing down
their necks with 70-73-143. So
was defending champion Kel Na-
gle of Australia with 68-75-143
after a round played in the rough-
est weather of the day.
Only one other American, 52-
year-old Paul Runyan of La Jol-
la, Calif., made the final two
rounds. He shot 41-37-77 for a
total of 75-77-152. Last Saturday
Runyan won the World Seniors
championship with a 3 and 1 vic-
tory over England's Sam King at
nearby Fairhaven.
Player Fades
Gary Player, the 25-year-old
South African who heads the mon-
ey winners on the American cir-
cuit along with Palmer, faded to
a 77 and wound up with a total of
150-eight strokes behind the
leaders.
Palmer started his round as
though he was going to burn up
the course.
He seemed set for a very low
score despite strong winds and
huge galleries that spilled over the
fairways and surrounded the
greens whenever he played a shot.

USED CARS
'58 VAUXALL
4-door sedan in excellent condition
A gas saver-$735.00
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N2
VW CONVERTIBLE
1958 with radio and white walls
Very nice-$1250
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N4
'59 ALFA-ROMEO
Guilletta Roadster with radio, heater
in tip-top condition
$1995.00
Overseas Auto Sales
331 S. 4th Ave. NO 2-2541
N3
BUSINESS SERVICES
TUTORING IN SPANISH-M.A., college
teaching experience. NO 2-1716. J114
RIDING LESSONS
Horseback riding. English equipment.
Horses boarded and trained. Herbell
Farm, 4715 E. Joy Road. Phone NO
3-7708. Lloyd Givens, manager-trainer.
.116
SWEET CHERRIES
By the quart or by the pound, pitted.
Also starting the 17th, Montmorency
cherries, washed, pitted and sugared.
HURON FARMS
4674 E. Huron River Dr. NO 8-7808
J115
All roads lead to
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Food
Specialties
Kitchen Utensils
OPEN EVERY NIGHT TILL MIDNIGHT
Ji
PERSONAL
SINCERE, Really had a fabulous time
in the Towers. Hot for Rand's-
HONEST. F6
ACADEMIC-MINDED MOTHERS (pets
and spouses prohibited, but offspring
prerequisite) interested in co-op hous-
ing for fall, please write P.O. Box 466.
F9
HELP WANTED
FOR PART-TIME sales work, University
of Michigan summer student. See Mr.
Pete Zahner, Jim White Chevrolet. H8
FOR SALE
JAGUAR XK-120 M Coupe, wire wheels,
22,000 miles. NO 3-9821. -.B1
DIAMONDS-Several beautiful stones-
sacrifice. NO 2-5685, evenings. B9
'57 METROPOLITAN convertible. Excel-
lent condition. $595. 906 E. Ann St.
B10
Phone NO 2-4786
for Michigan Daily
Classified Ads

A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. washington NO 2-1834
X3
ATTENTION
SUMMER STUDENTS !
CLEARANCE ON ALL HI FI
PORTABLES IN STOCK
-UP TO 20% OFF-
SERVICE AND REPAIRS FAST,
EFFICIENT, GUARANTEED
DIAMOND NEEDLES FROM $2.95
ANN ARBOR
HI F1 & TV CENTER
304 South Thayer.
ACROSS FROM HILL AUDITORIUM
ASK FOR BIG JIM
X1
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
TRANSPORTATION
DRIVING TO DENVER July 28. Can take
riders, share expenses and driving.
Call NO 3-4522 after 6 p.m. G2
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-35 mm. colored slides in yellow
envelope, Ann St., Hospital area.
Finder please call NO 3-5381. AS

MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS

FOR RENT
CAMPUS Furnished Apartment. $50 per
month, summer only. NO 3-4322. 019
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments for
rent. NO 2-1443. C17
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnished
apartment suitable for four girls.
Parking. Call 2-0671.C 66
3-ROOM furnished apt. near Packard
and State. $70 for summer months.
NO 3-8458. C20
ON CAMPUS garage and lot parking
available for summer and fall semes-
ters. NO 2-1443. 016
FOUR GIRLS desire roommate to share
house July-August. Reasonable rent.
Close to campus. Call NO 8-6378 eve-
nings. C23
NOW AVAILABLE - Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a small duck.
Cali NO 5-7892. 09
CAMPUS AREA-One-, two- and three-
bedroom apartments. Summer or fall
rental. Call Robertson Realty Co., NO
2-6436. Evenings NO 8-7878 or 426-
3402. 022
FURNISHED University-operated apart-
ments available to married students
and married faculty for summer
session. Leases available on short
term basis. Call NO 2-3169 or apply
University Apartments Office, 2364
Bishop St. Office open Mon. through
Sat. 014
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858
67
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
81
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's wears short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.99; wash-n-wear slacks
$2.77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. w2

.

Though you are here for
the summer only, we
hope that you will
come in and get
acquainted.
JOHN L EIDY
Phone NO 8-6779 * 601 East Liberty

4
f,
F
R';' i
Pj,^,'
'.'..'.
F 'r
1
;$r.
Ez?-','.
Cl>
_.. +r

Where

to

le

STARTING TODAY:
U.S. Cindermen Meet Soviets

.i

he
CHUCK WA GON
LUNCHES and DINNERS
FINE SALADS and SANDWICHES
Specializing in Roast Beef
Serving Wines and Beers from all over the world
QUICK LUNCH SERVICE
recommended by Duncan Hines and Gourmet
CATERING SERVICE AVAILABLE
OPEN 7 DAYS

s

Recommended . . by Duncan Hines . . by
the Gourmet Club .. by the AAA .. and by hundreds
of regular guests.
Luncheons, 11:30 to 2:00 Dinners, 5:30 to 7:30
Sunday: Dinners, 12:00 to 3:00 Closed Mondays
We suggest that you telephone
for reservations.
Vhe Cornerflouofe
S. Thayer at Washington in Ann Arbor
.. A block west of Rackhom Bldg.-NO 8-6056
-b
-7 71 a

"N

MOSCOW A)-Little Jim Beat-
ty of San Jose, Calif., said 'yes-
terday he would run the 1,500
meters in the big United States-
Soviet track meet tomorrow and
Sunday despite pressure from the
brass to make him run the 5,000
meters.
"I was in New York a full week
during the National AAU cham-
pionships last month," said Amer-
ica's top distance runner, "and
they could have said something
to me then. After all, I qualified as
a 1,500-meter man and I have
been training as one. I would have
been glad to switch had I known
it then.
"But I can't change on such
short notice.'

run by an American (13 minutes,
51.8 seconds) and would have
stood at least a chance of beating
Pyotr Bolotnikov, the Olympic
champion and world record hold-
er at 10,000 meters, who will start
for Russia in the 5,000.
Bolotnikov is running the short-
er race because he is not in con-
dition for the 10,000 meters (about
6% miles).
Since the United States is al-
most certain to win the 1,500 me-
ters (metric mile) with Dyrol Bur-
leson, the switch of Beatty to the
longer race might have given them
a chance for another first.
Changing Own Standards
"When they start trying to
change runners to events other
+hn" ha.nac in hic+thPV lial

"I think a personal telephone
call would have changed some of
their minds," said Beatty, "but I
guess that it never occurred to
them just like it never came to
anyone to tell me they wanted me
to run the 5,000."
Unthinkable
As a matter of fact, Soviet
Coach Gabriel Korobkov did not
enter Bolotnikov in the 5,000 un-
til he was certain that Beatty
would run in the 1,500. The
thought of a Russian Olympic
distance running champion losing
to an American substitute would
be unthinkable.
The starting lineups for the big
weekend meet follow the official
tryout results except that Frank
Budd of Villanova. will run the

2045 Packard Hours 1 1 A.M.-9 P.M.
LARRY DAVIS, Proprietor

NO 2-1661

q

341 SOUTH MAIN STREET . . . NO3-2701

I

FRESH
WHOLE
LOBSTER
Drawn butter,I 31z lb.
average from the East
Coast and kept in our

FINE
SEAFOOD

4
4

I I

I

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan