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July 12, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-07-12

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k JULY,12,1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE'

s .. .,

KAZARINOFF VIEWS SOVIETS:
Average Russian Feels Free, Secure

Chivalry, Fraternizing
Characterize Civil War

CLASSIFIEDS

By MICHAEL OLINICK
There's little actual difference
between the average American's
concern for civil liberties and the
average Russian's.
That's the conclusion of Prof.
Nicholas Kazarinoff, a University
mathematician who was the first
American ever to teach a full
course at Moscow State Univer-
sity.
"Neither of these peoples thinks
very much about abstract free-
doms. The average man in both
countries will accept the limita-
tions put on his liberties," Prof.
Kazarinoff said.
The Russians consider them-
selves just as free as we consider
ourselves, he explained. They are
much more secure than they have
ever been in the past.
Intellectuals Cautious
"The intellectuals, however, are
still very cautious about social
contact with Americans. There has
been a great anti-spy campaign
generated after Francis Powers'
U-2 flight."
Prof. Karazinoff said his family
adopted the position that Russia
was a free country. They sub-
scribed to a Western newspaper
(though he doubted that a Rus-
sian would have the same free-
dom) and received some American
magazines.
Government censorship, which
would have stopped the Russian's
copy of the New York Times be-
fore he got it, delayed some of
the Kazarinoff mail. "It took

about one week for an air mail position in explaining his spy
letter to go from Moscow to Ann flights."
Arbor, but about three weeks the The Congo situation was well
other way round." covered in the Soviet press and
In political discussions with his the people felt very strongly about'

-Daily-Edward Langs
SOUVENIR GOAT-Prof. Nicholas Kazarinoff and his family
pose with some of their remembrances of their twelve-month-
long stay in the Soviet Union as a teacher at Moscow State Uni-
versity. The University mathematician here holds a toy goat for
his sons who, during their Soviet stay attended Russian schools
and learned the Russian language.

Muscovite acquaintances, Prof.
Kazarinoff admitted embarrass-
ment at certain American action
in foreign affairs.
"We arrived in Moscow at the
time of the Powers' trial and
found ourselves in a very tough

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the murder of Patrice Lumumba,
Prof. Kazarinoff said.
Cuban Invasion
The Cuban invasion, however,
seemed to be the big story of the
year. Moscow had heard much
about the whole development of
Castro's rule and the United States
position again caused exceeding
embarrassment for the Kazarin-
of fs.
The Russians were actually
frightened. They thought the
Americans were really seriously in-
volved in the invasion and might!
send American troops in if the
Cuban exiles did not win. They
felt the Soviets might then move
to back Castro and the outcome.
would be war.
"There is a greater longing for
peace in the Soviet Union than in
the United States," Prof. Kazar-
Cruise Probes
Lake Superior
Floor, History.
The University, working with
the University of Minnesota, is
engaged in a geological cruise to
explore the bottom of Lake Su-
perior.
Working aboard the Submarex,
a 173-foot former Navy patrol
boat, the geological team headed
by University Prof. James H. Zum-
berge of the geology department,
started exploratory drilling July
7.
Prof. Zumberge cited three ob-
jectives of the study:
1) Examination of the sedi-
ments accumulated at the lake's
bottom in order to determine more
precisely the history of the lake.
2) Study of the bedrock floor
of the lake in an attempt to re-
late the geology of the north and
south shores.
3) Determination of the degree
to which the lake owes its exist-
ence and present nature to gla-
cial formations and to the 10,000
years thathave passed since the
ice retreated..
The expedition plans to drill
nine holes at various sites across
the lake and retrieve samples of
the various formations which will
be subjected to minerological and
X-ray studies, examination for
grain size and contentof micro-
scopic organisms and p o 11 e n
grains.

inoff said, "because the Russians
have personally seen the death
and destruction which wara
brings."F
No Preventative War L
There is no talk of a preventa-
tive war in the Soviet Union.n
Prof. Kazarinoff said he knewr
of no other American professorst
who were teaching in the Soviets
Union though the University ofq
Leningrad and Harvard and the
University of Kiev and Yale havec
set up reciprocal faculty plans.f
He said there were about 30a
American students studying int
Moscow.
Students Inhibited
The Russian students aren't asc
freely expressive, as their Ameri-t
can counterparts, he said. Theyt
are much more reserved and politer
though this may be inhibitiona
caused by having an Americans
teacher.
The Russians take more coursesk
than we do. And they are expectedc
to have a wider background ini
their field of specialization. C
The liberal education comes in
high school for the Soviet citizen,t
Prof. Kazarnoff said. He special-
izes early, as an undergraduate
and often goes through an in-E
tensive three year graduate pro-I
gram at one of the scientific in-i
stitutes.
More Research
The graduate students are asked
to do more reading of monographs
and research papers and are sub-
jected to "pretty strict" examina-
tions.
Prof. Kazarinoff was determin-
ed that he, his wife and their
four children would not become
isolated from the Russians.rg
He succeeded in obtaining a
three room flat in an apartment
under the control of the Academy
of Science.
Government Accommodating
The Soviet government went
"out of its way" to accommodate
the Kazarinoff family, the 31-
year -old mathematician said.
"Apartments are hard to obtain
in Moscow. Though there is a
tremendous building boom in the
Soviet Union now, practically all
three room apartments are shared
by three families."
Prof. Kazarinoff. whose father
did graduate work at Moscow
University before he came to teach
at the University, speaks fluent
Russian. His children learned the
language as they attended Rus-
sian schools and his wife picked
up some of it when she taught
classes in conversational English.
Children Friendly
His older boys, in the third and
sixth grade, and his daughter, in
the first, were received in very
friendly fashion by the Russian
school children.
"They were quite shy at first,"
Prof. Kazarinoff recalls, "but our
children made lots of good friends
and are corresponding with them
now."
He doubted whether students
would normally accept foreigners
who don't speak their language as
readily as the Russians accepted
his children.
"They were simply treated as
other Russians."
Alumni Win
Six Awards
The University has won six
awards in the nationwide 1961
American Alumhi Council com-
petition.
Entries were received from more
than 1,000 schools and colleges in
the United States and results of
the judging were announced Mon-
day during the annual AAC con-
vention in Florida.

By DAVID MARCUS
Fraternizing and chivalry char-
acterized the Civil War, Prof. T.j
Harry Williams of Louisiana State
University said yesterday.
Lecturing on "The Last Gentle-
man's War," the northern born
historian and author noted thatl
there was "an unusual amount of
social contact and getting ac-
quainted between the two sides."
Williams saw the fact that "men
of the two armies came recently
from the same political structure
and cultural background" as fac-
tors contributing to this conduct.
No Barrier
He also noted that "the lack
of a language barrier and the
tendency of both sides to respond
to similar situations with similar
responses" as causes of the often
amenable relations between per-
sons in both warring factions.
Conflicting loyalties also faced
both sides. He cited the continuedc
celebration of the fourth of July1
in most of the South as exampless
of the confusion of tradition.
"They would tell foreign visitors
that 'it's as much our celebrationj
as it is theirs,' " he said.
He also noted one former south-I
ern governor who when told of
Lincoln's decision to declare a
naval blockade of the South yelled
"He can't do that; it's uncon-
stitutional."
Divided Loyalties1
Divided loyalties even extended
into families. Mrs. Abraham Lin-
coln had several half-brothers in
the Confederate army, Williams
said.
He cited another example, a
Pennsylvania farmer who hid in
the basement of his home during
the battle of Gettysburg while,
unknown to him a son he had
not seen for 25 years was man-
ning a Confederate gun in his
backyard.
He also noted that friendships
between officers of high rank
were common because many had
met at West Point.
Early Rivalry
"The Union General McClellan,
and the Confederate general, A.
P. Hill, had been rivals for the
same girl.when they were young.
"McClellan won her but it was
always said that when Hill fought
against McClellan, he fought just
that much harder."
He also noted the occasion when
the wife of Confederate general
Picket had a baby and the Con-
federate lines lit bonfires in cel-
ebration.
Eventually the news spread to
nearby Union forces and the
Union officers ordered bonfires
lit on the Union lines and the
Union officers sent their personal
congratulations.
New Friendships
Among the enlisted men, where
past acquaintances were less usual,
friendships often developed be-
tween men on picket duty where
they were often posted for weeks
in close proximity to members of
the opposing army.
"They swam together, played
cards together and traded coffee
back and forth," Williams said.
"Very often they would declare
a truce, realizing how silly it would
be for them to fight one another.
"Once, in Georgia, where pickets
had organized a truce, a Con-
federate officer came down and
ordered his men to shoot at the
Yankees. The men refused and
whie he stood there raging, a
Union picket drew a bead on him
and shot him down.
Became Nuisance
"The Yankee yelled to find out
if he had got him and one of the
Confederate pickets answered
'You sure did. He deserved it, he
was getting to be a nuisance,' "
Williams related.
Williams also cited an incident
in the Atlanta campaign where
Confederate troops, ordered to dig
trenches, were without shovels.
They were able to borrow them

from nearby Union troops who
were also digging trenches.
"The generals didn't like this
fraternizing; they thought it de-
moralized the men and destroyed
their will to fight," Williams said.
"One day the Confederate Gen-
eral Gordon suspected that some

PERSONAL
ACADEMIC-MINDED MOTHERS (pets
and spouses prohibited, but offspring
prerequisite) interested in co-op hous-
ing for fall, please write P.O. Box 466.
F9
SINCERE, Really had a fabulous time
in the Towers. Hot for Rand's-
HONEST. F6
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3

PROF. T. HARRY WILLIAMS
... romantic war
of his pickets were fraternizing.
He rode down to the river and
asked them if they were.
'Not Now'
"Though they denied it, he had
just heard a splash and hauled out
from the river. He asked the Yan-
kee if he knew that there was a
war being fought.
"He answered 'Yes general, but
we're not fighting it here and
now.'
"The general wanted to take
the man prisoner but the c.om-
pany protested that it would ruin
their honor since the Yankee was
an invited guest.
"The general let him go with a
warning to return to his own side.
"All these incidents show how
these people thought about war,"
Williams commented.
'Romantic Light'
"Though they knew it was not
romantic, they could not help but
think of it in a romantic light.
"It also shows a terrible pathos.
"One feels that somehow, if the
armies could have gotten together
and talked, if the people of both
sides could have gotten together
and talked, all the problems could
have been solved in half an hour
of effective' compromise."
'U' Sponsors
Health Institute
About 20 public welfare agen-
cies representing state, local and
federal government are partici-
pating in the University's school
of Public Health's Training Insti-
tute on the Administration of
Medical Care for the Needy, July
10-21.
The program is carried out un-
der a five year grant, from the
United States Public Health Serv-
ice. ,
Speakers will include:
Dean Charles I. Schottland of
Brandeis University; Hiram Sib-
ley, former Social Security com-
missioner and now associate sec-
retary of the Council on Blue
Cross; and Dr. Herbert Notkin,
medical director of the Onondaga
County Department of Welfare,
Syracuse, New York.
The Institute is a part of a Uni-
versity program for the training
of people in public welfare medi-
cal, care administration. Partici-
pants in it are eligible for the
Master of Public Health degreQ..
Steiner To Speak
On 'Conciliation'
Prof. H. Arthur Steiner of the
UCLA political science depart-
ment, will lecture on "Internation-
al Conciliation" in Aud. A, July
12 at 4 p.m.

Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
HELP WANTEO
FOR PART-TIME sales work, University
of Michigan summer student. See Mr.
tPee Zahner, Jim White Chevrolet. H8
DIXIELAND DRUMMER WANTED.
Please call Tom Lough, NO 3-0807 or
Univ. Ext. 421W days. H17
COLLEGE WOMEN NEEDED for tele-
phone work in advertising office of
local dry cleaners. Salary plus com-
missions. Evening hours, 5 p.m.-9 p.m.
For interview phone NO 2-9546. H6
SUMMER JOB
2 MEN 2
Must be neat appearing, converse
intelligently, able to handle stock.
$65 per week.
Call Mr. ZaJac
9 a.m.-2 p.m., NO 3-6003
H15
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. washington
Phone NO 3-4858
87
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.
Complete Automotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South, University
NO 8-9168
Si
FOR SALE

CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Most frames replaced
while you wait.
Broken lenses duplicated
FAST service on all repairs.
240 NICKELS ARCAD
NO 2-9116 NO 8-601
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: she
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; ki
sport shirts $1.99; wash-n-wear sla
$2.77; many other big buys-San
Store, 122 B. Washington.
WANTED
GIRL to share modern campus apa
ment. NO 3-6030. B
FOR RENT
CAMPUS Furnished Apartment. $501
month, summer only. NO 3-4322.C
ON CAMPUS furnished apartments
rent. NO 2-1443.
CAMPUS-HOSPITAL-Lovely furnis
apartment suitable for four g:i
Parking. Call 2-0671.
3-ROOM furnished apt, near Packs
and State. $70 for summer Mont
NO 3-8458.t
3-ROOM furnished apartment withp
vate bath and washing facilities.
3-8458.t
ON CAMPUS garage and lot park
available for summer and fall isen
ters. NO 2-1443
SUMMER ONLY
2-bedroom campus apartment us
redecorated and refurnished. $95 f
the summer. NO 3-7268.t

BUSINESS SERVICES
TUTORING IN SPANISH--M.A., college
teaching experience. NO 2-1716. J14
HoI atTeescodppa ap'

Hot party? Thofee' cold pop at Ralpl
to cool it off.
Cool nights in the Arb? There's b
chocolate at Ralph's to warm 'emi
RALPH'S MARKET
709 Packard
Open every night till midnightl

NOW AVAILABLE.- Across from East
Quad: 2 parking spaces, part of an
exciting apartment, and a Small duck.
Call NO 5-7892. 09
CAMPUS AREA-One-, two- and three-
bedroom apartments. Summer or fall
rental. Call Robertson Realty Co., NO
2-6436. Evenings NO 8-7478 or 428-
3402. 022
FURNISHED University-operated apart-
ments available to married students
and married faculty for summer
session. Leases available on short
term basis. Call NO 2-3169 or apply
University Apartments Office, 2364
Bishop St. Office open Mon. through
Sat. 014

DIAMONDS-Several beautiful stones-
sacrifice. NO 5-2685, evenings. B9
'57 METROPOLITAN convertible. Excel-
lent condition. $595. 906 E. Ann St.
B10
GREAT BOOKS of the Western World
from the Encyclopedia Britannica-
never used. 54 vols.-must sell. NO 5-
8757. B8
2-BEDROOM HOME in City. Shady.
fenced-in yard, 2-car garage. °$800
down to assume PHA mortgage. $90
per month includes all taxes and in-
surance. NO 5-8485. B4
'59 FIAT BIANCHINA SPECIAL, 45 MPG,
65 MPH, cruises 58. Excellent running
condition, brand new tires. Best of-
fer over $550. 219 Packard, rear apt.,
after 6:30 P.M. B6
JAGUAR XK-120 M Coupe, wire wheels,
22,000 miles. NO 3-9821. B1

lh'a
hot
up.
Jo
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9
J3
lOrt
snit
cks
m's
W2
art-
BB3
per
019
for
017
Fed
;ris.
066
ard
,ts.
C20
pri-
NO
013
sing
es-
016
st
or
C21

For RESULTS
7J

r
f

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Daily Classifieds

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Pin- Ilhneq
9do&s hkn

TONIGHiT
8:00 MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
fun in a French penal colony
by Sam & Bella Spewack

li

Vacation- Travel- Town
where only the LOOK
is expensive COOL-cottons for those Hot
July and August Days-
ON FOREST (We always have them)
offS. Univ. corner
app. Campus Theatre At Left is-
CUSTOMER PARKIG LA PETITE-PRINT ringed round 'n
{ round with rick-rack. Vicky Vaughn
Business Hours: adds a widened belt, a flirty ker-
9:30 to 5:30 chief. A St. Tropez sans - season
Mon. thru Fri.
fashion as seen in SEVENTEEN.
Closedt
Sat. I s. M.Fine crisp cotton in red / black,
blue/green or black/white. 5 to 15.
$9.98
second floor dress dept.

N.Y.TIMES

y

3

"BRAWLING and
EXNILARANT
ABANDON on
the SCREEN!"
-Time Magazine
"A GEM!".
- N.Y: Herald Tribune

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