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June 28, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-06-28

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WEDNESDAY, JUNE 28,1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP:
Eichmann Cites SS Orders

Congress May Grant Aid
To Non-Public Schools
By FRED ULEMAN

REGENTS:
'Committee Appointments
Approved at June Meeting

By The Associated Press
JERUSALEM-Adolf Eichmanri
testified yesterday direct orders
from SS chief Henrich Himmler
forced him to change from a friend
of the Jews to their most im-
placable enemy.
He told the court trying him
for crimes against the Jewish peo-
ple: "I could not decide anything
on my own initiative. I got orders
and I acted accordingly."
Eichmann's defense counsel,
Robert Servatius, submitted docu-
ment to show Himmler used
Eichmann to block every attempt
by Jews to escape the Nazi holo-
caust in the early days of World
War II.
Eichmann has testified in his
11-week trial he did everything to
help Jews emigrate from Nazi-
dominated areas. He said yester-
day he was forced to stop Jewish
emigration to Palestine and every
other haven sought by desperate
victims of the spreading Nazi
menace.
CHICAGO-Secretary of State
Dean Rusk said yesterday the
United States government is dis-
cussing a number of alternatives
to keep Nationalist China from
losing its seat in the United Na-
tions in any possible move to seat
Communist China in the UN.
Asked at a news conference
whether there are any United
States discussions of the possibil-
ity of the United States recogniz-
ing Communist China, Rusk re-
plied, "none whatsoever."
* * *
GENEVA-Gen. Phoumi Nosa-
van, military strongman of the
pro-Western government of Laos,
is flying to Washington today in
hopes of strengthening his gov-
ernment's alliance with the Unit-
ed States.
Phoumi, commander of the 23,-
000 men in the United States-
equipped royal Laotian army, said
yesterday he also will report to the
State Department on last week's
agreement in Zurich among the
heads - of the three warring fac-
tions in Laos.
* * *
ROME - Italy plans to fire a.
mouse 180 miles into space and
back aboard a two-stage rocket
within a few months, the nation's
space research chief said yester-
dat Prof. Luigi Broglio, presi-
dent of the Italian commission for
space research, denied a magazine
report that Italy would try to
launch a three-stage rocket into
orbit around the Earth before the
end of summer.
NEW YORK - Dr. Luther L.
Terry, United States surgeon gen-
eral, said yesterday there is no

-AP Wirephoto
ORGANIZATION CHARTS-Adolph Eichmann studies the hand
drawn charts he offered in evidence at his Jerusalem trial yes-
terday.

chance that oral polio vaccine
will be licensed for general use
during this year's polio season.
WASHINGTON-Adlai E. Stev-
enson was reported to have said
the problem of protecting internal
security in Latin American na-
tions, with Cuba as a Communist
base, has become a major one.
He was quoted as saying that
Communist pamphlets on organiz-
ing guerrilla warfare were found

in Uruguay and that many Latin
American governments were aware
Cuban embassies were being used
to import all kinds of Red prop-
aganda.
WASHINGTON - House and
Senate conferees agreed yesterday
on most provisions of President
John F. Kennedy's bill to permit
men to retire under social security
at 62 and to liberalize various
benefits.

In light of past Supreme Court
rulings, Congress may grant fi-
nancial assistance to parochial
schools, so long as the money is
designated to serve secular needs,
Prof. Paul C. Kauper of the Uni-
versity law school said yesterday.{
Prof. Kauper, speaking on "Gov-
ernment and Religion: The Wall
of Separation," noted that the{
changing history of Supreme Court
decisions from the early interpre-
tations that the government "can
do nothing to sanction or aid re-
ligion" to the recent ones in which
the government "may take into
account the religious interest of
its people so long as its acts do
not result in coercion of non-be-
lievers," has done much to estab-
lish a guide in the separation be-
tween what Martin Luther called
"the kingdom of the sword" and
"the kingdom of the spirit."
The problem of church-state
separation has received increased
attention since the election of a
Roman Catholic President in the
United States because, as was
pointed out during the campaign,
the Roman Catholic Church does
not recognize the traditional divi-
sion.
President John F. Kennedy's ac-
tions have made it clear, however,
that he deviates from the tradi-
tional church stand in this re-
spect. His election signaled the
end of the Protestant domination
on United States thinking and the
emergence of greater power for
the Catholic and Jewish minori-
ties.
Aid Extended
The interest in the church-state
separation was furthered by the
introduction of a bill in Congress
to extend federal aid to education-
al systems. The American public
school system developed as one
controlled by Protestant interests,
and consequently objected to giv-
ing funds to parochial schools.
The Supreme Court, while re-
cently upholding the Sunday Blue
Laws. which stipulate the closure
of business on Sunday, has found
a Maryland ruling that public
office seekers must affirm a faith'
in God to be unconstitutional.
This seemingly contradictory set
of rulings both stems from and
provides a basis for the current
confusion about church-state sep-
aration.
The division of the church and
state is provided for in the First
Amendment to the Constitution,
which states that Congress may
not prohibit the free exercise of
religion and shall make no law
respecting the establishment of
religions.
This amendment has been ex-
tended to affect the states by the

PAUL C. KAUPER
... cites court decisions

Religious Affairs Office Sets
Arts and worship Conference

The Conference on "Worship
and the Arts" at the University
beginning yesterday and ending
tomorrow will include a play, lec-
tures, seminars and concerts.
Concerned with music, art,
drama and architecture, the con-
ference concurs with the Speech
Department production of the re-
ligious drama "JB" by Archibald
MacLeish.
Prof. Ernest Koenker of the
theology department of Valpariso
University, architect Edward A.
Sovik, Prof. Harold A. Hauch of
the School of Music, Prof. Emil
Weddige of the School of Archi-
tecture and Design and Michael P.
Church will head seminars or give
lectures.
The conference also includes two
concerts. Last night, the Ann Ar-
bor Cantata singers presented a
program at Hill Auditorium.
Tomorrow at 8:30 p.m. at Hill
Aulitorium, Marilyn Mason will

present an organ recital with com-
mentary by Hans David.
Other featares of the conference
are:
A discussion of the play "JB",
a lecture on "The Faith of the
Church and the Form of the
Church", seminars on "The Prob-
lem of the Solo in the Service",
"Contemporary Religious Com-
poser in a Changing World," "The
Structure We Build" and "Artistic
Values" and a panel on "The Im-
age of Man in Contemporary
Drama".
IOrganization 1
Notices
USE OF THIS COLUMN for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the summer semester should register by
July 5, 1961. Forms available, 3011 Stu-
dent Activities Building.

use of the 14th Amendment de-
manding equal protection and
privileges for all.
Under the provisions of the
First Amendment, the first Su-
preme Court decisions led to ex-
treme separation on the grounds
that for a state to cooperate with
a particular church was to give
that church preferential treat-
ment and aid in its establishment.
Realizing that such decisions
alienated the churches from the
state and gave preferential treat-
ment to the non-believer, a later
ruling was made with the view
that "we are a religious people"
and, while not making religion
compulsory, should tolerate those
who wish to believe.
Against this background the
new feeling is that a religious in-
stitution may be upheld if there
are adequate considerations of a
civic or public nature.
Prof. Kauper's remarks were
prepared as part of the Univer-
sity's special summer school for
lawyers.
Create Areas-
For Scooters
Beginning July 10, it will be
necessar for all staff - owned
motorcycles, motor scooters, and
motorized bicycles to have parking
permits.
The Office of Parking Adminis-
tration, which made the announce-
ment, also said that signs will be
placed on present staff parking
areas designating scooter space.
The program will make use of
currently unaseable areas in Uni-
versity parking lots and is de-
signed to eliminate congestion
caused by cyclists' using spaces
reserved for automobiles.
Approximately 80 vehicle spaces
will be reserved for holders of the
parking permit, which cost $10
each. Permits may be purchased
at the Office of Parking Ad-
ministration, 1059 Administration
Building.
The office also announced the
extended validity of 1960-61 staff
au.to parking permits until July
8.
Mason To Talk
On Civil War
Prof. P. Mason of ithe Wayne
State University architecture col-
lege will talk on "Civil War Pho-
tography" at 7:15 p.m. today in
Aud. B, Angell Hall.
His address will be followed by
the officialopening of the exhibi-
tion "Michigan in the Civil War,"
a collection of photographs and
drawings exhibited in the galleries
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
The exhibition will be open to
the public through Aug. 13.

The Regents approved 42 com-
mittee appointments at their June
16 meeting.
Two appointments to the library
council were Vice-President for
Research Ralph Sawyer and Dean
Philip N. Youtz of the architec-
tural college to succeed Prof. Rob-
ert S. Fox of the education school
and Dean James B. Wallace of
the music school, both for four-
year terms.
Approved to posts on the execu-
tive committee of the literary col-
lege were Prof. Theodore M. New-
comb of the Mental Health Re-
search Institute to succeed Prof.
William B. Willcox of the his-
tory department, Prof. Robert W.
Parry of the chemistry department
to succeed Prof. James T. Wilson,
chairman of the geology depart-
ment, for three-year terms.
Medical School
Prof. Gordon C. Brown of the
medical school succeeds Prof. J.
M. Horton, also of the medical
school, to a four-year term on the
executive committee of the pub-
lic health school.
Three-year terms were approved
for Prof. Glen V. Berg of the en-
gineering college and Prof. W. Al-
len Spivey of the business school
who succeed Prof. Norman R.
Scott and Prof. Wallace W. Gard-
ner to posts on the executive com-
mittee of the computing center.
Two faculty members succeed
themselves on the executive com-
mittee of the Michigan Memorial-
Phoenix project, Profs. Ferrel
Heady of the political science de-
partment and Dugald E. S. Brown
of the zoology department, both
for four-year terms.
Social Research
On the executive committee of
the social research institute, ap-
pointments were approved for
Prof. Joseph A. Boyd of the en-
gineering college to succeed Prof.
Russel A. Smith of the law school,
Dean Myron E. Wegman of the
public health school to succeed
Prof. Theodore M. Newcomb of
the mental health research insti-
tute, Prof. Ferrel Heady of the po-
litical science department to suc-
ceed himself, all for three-year
terms.
Prof. Felix E. Moore of the pub-
lic health statistics department
succeeds Prof. Norman R. Scott of
the engineering college to a four-
year term on the executive com-
mittee of the statistical research
laboratory.
Three professors succeed them-
selves to posts on the executive
committee of the science and tech-!
nology institute. Dean Stephen S.
Atwood of the engineering college,
Dean Roger W. Heyns of the lit-
erary college and Prof. Horace W.
Davenport, chairman of the de-
partment of physiology, will serve
for three-year terms.
On the committee on American
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institutions lectureship and pro-
fessorship, James K. Pollock will
succeed himself for a three-year
term.
Prof. James B. Scott of the bus-
iness school succeeds Prof. J.
Philip Wernette to a two-year
term on the executive committee
of the business school.
Two faculty members and an
alumni member succeed them-
selves for four-year terms on the
Board of Governors for Religious
Affairs, Prof. Howard Y. McClus-
ky of the education school, Prof.
George E. Mendenhall of the Near
Eastern studies department and
Charles A. Hoffman.
Service Bureau
Deans Willard C. Olson of the
education school and James H.
Robertson of the literary college
will serve three-year terms, suc-
ceeding themselves, on the execu-
tive committee of the bureau of
school services.
On the executive committee of
the Dearborn Center, Prof. R. Lee
Brummet of the business school
succeeds Prof. John W. Lederle,
who has resigned from the Univer-
sity, for a three-year term.
Dean Herbert W. Johe of the
architectural college and Prof.
Harry A. Towsley of the medical
school will succeed themselves for
three-year terms to posts on the
University committee on broad-
casting.
Art Museum
Appointed to a two-year term
on the executive committee of the
museum of art is Prof. Richard
Edwards of the art history depart-
ment to succeed Prof. Harold E.
Wethey of the same department.
Interquadrangle Council Presi-
dent Thomas Moch, '62, and As-
sembly Association President Sally
Jo Sawyer, '62, will serve one-year
terms as student representatives
on the residence halls board of
governors, Prof. Frank X. Braun
of the German department suc-
ceeds Prof. Robert H. Hoisington
of the engineering college for a
three-year term on the committee.
Serving on the executive board

of the Horace H. Rackham school
of graduate studies will be, Profs.
Burton L. Baker of the medical
school and Philip J. Elving of the
chemistry department succeeding
Profs. Franklin D. Johnston of
the medical school and Kenneth
L. Jones of the botany depart-
ment, all serving for four-year
terms.
Leave Given
Prof. Willard A. Oberdick of the
architecture college is on sabbati-
cal leave and will be replaced by
Prof. Joseph J. Wehrer for the
first semester of 1961-62 on the
executive committee of the col-
lege. Prof. C. Theodore Larson
succeeds Prof. Joseph F. Albano
for a four-year term. All commit-
tee appointees are members of the
architectural college.
Approved to fill the position of
Prof. Leslie R. Bassett of the mu-
sic school, who is on leave, is Prof.
Robert A. Warner of the political
science department, who will serve
a one-year term on the executive
committee of the school of music.
Appointed to the executive com-
mittee of the engineering college
was Prof. Lawrence N. Van Vlack
of the engineering college to suc-
ceed Prof. Lewis N. Holland, also
of the engineering college, for a
four-year term.
Prof. R. Faye McCain of the
nursing school was appointed to
succeed Prof. Edith G. Morgan,
also of the nursing school, on the
executive committee of the nurs-
ing school for a two-year term.
Five appointments were approv-
ed to the executive committee of
the Flint college, all for one-year
terms. Prof. Douglas A. Hayes of
the business school, Prof. Howard
R. Jones of the education school
and Prof. William R. Murchie of
the zoology department all suc-
ceed themselves. Prof. Virgil M.
Bett of the economics department
and Prof. Donald E. De Graaf of
the physics department will suc-
ceed Prof. Edward T. Calver of the
English department and Prof.
Robert H. Cojeen of the business
school.

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LAOS:
Viet Nam Officials Hit U.S. Inaction;
Fear 1954 Communist Partitioning Plan

-

By RENE-GEORGES INAGAKI
Associated Press Feature Writer
VIENTIANE UIP)-Gloomy gov-
ernment officials fear Commu-
nist China is striving for east-
west partition of Laos to open a
line of attack into Southeast
Asia's rice bowl.
Bitterly charging the anti-Com-
munist world has refused to save
Laos, the officials say privately
the Red Chinese, regardless of
what they say at the 14-nation
conference in Geneva, want an
open road pointing at South Viet
Nam, Thailand and Cambodia.
Many Concessions
Heightening the gloom here is
the feeling that Premier Boun
Oum of the royal government
made too many concessions to his
pro-Communistnandaself-styled
neutralist opponents at the sum-
mit meeting of the three rival
princes of Laos in Zurich last
week. They agreed to form a coa-
lition government, with pro-West-
ern forces in the minority.
But looming over all other Lao-
tian fears is Red China. Peiping,
Laotian officials say, never has
forgotten its 1954 suggestion that
Laos be partitioned on a line run-
ning roughly from Muong Sing in
the North to the Cambodian bor-
der in the south.
Rebel Lines
This is the picture given pri-
vately:
When fighting stopped last
wonth the pro-Communist Pathet
Lao rebels stood at Muong Sai,
north of Luang Prabang; Ban Hin
Heup, a point north of Paksane;
Mahaxay, east of Thakhek; Mu-
ong Pha Lane, west of Savannak-
bet, and various other points along
a line southward.
These pointsform a line coin-
ciding with the partition line pro-
posed by Red China at the 1954
Geneva conference which ended

the Indochina war and gave Laos
its independence from France.
If such a line should be solidi-
fied, it would reduce non-Commu-
nist territory in Laos to a thin
band running from the Northwest
to the South along the Mekong
River.
This would give Red China an
open highway for infiltration and
subversion of all of Laos and,
eventually, adjacent Thailand,
Cambodia and South Viet Nam.
Royal Laotians say the rice pad-
dies of Southeast Asia are a strong
lure for Red China and Commu-
nist North Viet Nam, both fight-
ing severe food shortages.
"It's the famished Viets," Laos
has to worry about, one high offi-
cial said.
Backbone of Forces
Many government officials claim
North Vietnamese already are the
backbone of Pathet Lao rebel
forces and Laotians have no doubt
the Red Chinese will use them in
the vanguard during a drive
South.
The Soviet Union, is regarded
here by many officials as sincere-
ly desiring a neutral Laos as a
buffer to Communist China's ex-
pansion. But the Russians are giv-
en little chance of holding back
their Communist allies.
Many royal Laotians feel the
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country's only hope of staying out-
side the Communist bloc lies in
a basic sense of patriotism they
see in Prince Souphanouvong,
leader of the pro-Communist
Pathet Lao, and Prince Souvanna
Phouma, leader of the self-styled
neutralists.
Not Published
A communique covering the
conference between these two
leaders and Boun Oum in Zurich
still has not been published by
the pro-Western government in
Vientiane.
Boun Oum is thought to have
made too many concessions. But
many Laotians say he had no
choice since the anti-Communist
world refuses to step in and save
Laos. Boun Oum's own troops-

23,000 men supplied by the United
States-have been unable to do so.
They have been regularly defeat-
ed by the Pathet Lao.
What disturbs Laotians about
the communique-published here
in news reports-is that it calls
for general elections in Laos but
sets forth no concrete proposals
for withdrawing foreign troops.
It will be easy to verify the
withdrawal of the 300-man United
States advisory and assistance
group, Laotian officials say, but
not so easy to prove withdrawal
of North Vietnamese disguised as
Pathet Lao.
Boun Oum and his vice pre-
mier, Gen. Phoumi Nosavan, yes-
terday attended the Geneva con-
ference on Laos for the first time.

MONTH-END
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OPENING TONIGHT
8:00 P.M. LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Department of Speech
presents
Archibald MacLeish's powerful retelling of the Job story
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