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August 02, 1961 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-02

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:E

j WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2, 1961

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

PAGE THRE

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 2,1961 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE THRE E

Meier Analyzes Rise of Research Parks,
Technological Innovation in Urban Areas

(Continued from Page 1)
Tracing the development of
these centers, he said, "One of the
earliest in the field was the pro-
gram developed by the state of
North Carolina calculated to in-
crease the supply of research
scientists and engineers and at-
tract the most modern industry."
In planning the area, a triangle
was drawn with universities at the
three points. The universities sup-
plied students to be employed as
technicians and research assistants
as well as recruits for full-time
staff and faculty members who
could be used as consultants.
Planners also included several
industrial estates so that indus-
tries developing out of discoveries
can easily settle nearby.

DIAL NO 5-6290
"A delightful picture
4 a surefire hit!"
-Barry Wolman, Daily
FANNY was 18 and
French-a most
intriguing combination!

"In Ann Arbor, all the experi-
ence to date is being drawn upon,''
he said referring to the research
parks located near the University.
Threatens Area
"Advanced mechanization in the
auto industry, along with decen-
tralization of production has
created massive unemployment in
the Detroit area and threatens to
turn one of the richest states into
a permanently depressed area.
"An important component in
the program to stimulate new
growth is the establishment of a
development area equivalent in
effect to the penninsula region in
Northern California and the pe-
riphery of Boston."
Sees 'Classic' Example
"The Stanford story is a classic
example of the discovery and ex-
ploitation of hidden opportunities
created by the growth of a re-
search-oriented technology," he
said.
Founding the Stanford Research
Institute, Stanford soon had the
largest non-profit applied research
organization in the country.
"Bynbeing alert to opportunities
all over the world, catholic in its
research interests, and able to
draw upon the repositories of
knowledge, particularly libraries,
and skill that had been patiently
accumulated in a university com-
munity for decades, it broke down
a long standing compartmentiliza-
tion of effort and provided bases
for growth in new directions, par-
ticularly business research and
broad gauge technical assistance
overseas," Prof. Meier explained.
"The tract of unsalable land
that had been reached by the
growing fringe of the San Fran-
cisco metropolitan complex would
inevitably have generated some
AIR CONDITIONED
BOWLING
1:00 P.M.- 13:00 P.M.
daily except Sun.
at the
MICHIGAN UNION

CIVIL WAR:
Union Stopped Short
Of Total Emancipation
By JUDITH OPPENHEIM #reau" was designed to help the
"There is something wrong with Negro orient himself as a free
the mental processes of historians member of a community was not
who stress the harshness of the large enough to handle the nec-
reconstruction government and ig- I essary job and was abolished be-
nore the complete depravity of the fore its usefulness could be fully
Southern whites after the Civil exploited.
War," Prof. Dwight L. Dumond, By 1876 when the reconstruc-
of the history department, said tion governments were withdrawn,
yesterday. the Negroes were left almost en-
Speaking on "The Great Be- tirely at the mercy of the South-
trayal," the 12th in a series of ern whites.
panels and lectures commemorat- Prevent Voting
ing the centennial of the Civil The Southerners kept them
War, Prof. Dumond said every- from voting, filled all the addi-
thing the Union fought for in tional congressional seats gained
the war was betrayed by the fail- because of the newly-counted Ne-
ure of the national government to gro population and filed back to
assure total emancipation of the Congress to obstruct any correc-
31/ million Negroes in the United tive legislation through the years.
States. "The entire resources of the
"We struck the chains from the federal government should have
limbs of men and called in free- been committed to whatever ex-
dom," he said, but explained that tent was required to establish pub-
the attitude of the Southern lic schools, colleges and universi-
whites toward the Negroes did not ties, give homesteads to the for-
change as a result of legal eman- mer slaves, provide vocational
cipation training and protect them in all

i
E

Women Get New Co-ops

SKILLED ASSISTANCE - Industrial concerns located near
major universities can draw upon the skill of scientists and re-
searchers, such as this one in a University radio isotope labora-
tory, to improve their products and services.

significant values, but a sizable
multiplier was obtained due to the
presence of the faculty, the library
and alumni loyalty."
In the Boston area, Prof. Meier
noted the growth of research firms
along Route 128, a road which
borders the city.
Notable Combination
"Here it was a notable combina-
tion between a technical entre-
peneurial tradition maintained at
the Massachussetts Institute , of
Technology - which respected a
man even more highly if he went
into business on the side and
developed his own discoveries in
the form of salable components -
and a long tradition in investment
banking that was not satisfied
with run-of-the-mill propositions."

u LESLIE MAURICE
r CARON-CHEVALIER
CHARLESNORST
BOYER B U CH HO1
TECHNICOLOR'

I

Tonight- see
gripping Oriental drama
Fay and Michael Kanin's
8:00 P.M. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
PERFORMANCES THRU SATURDAY EVENING
*or-today get tickets for another
of the exciting performances
Tonight, Tomorrow-$1.50, 1.00
Friday, Saturday-$1.75, 1.25
presented by
UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
Deportment of Speech

However, he found a major flaw
in the Boston development. ".
Further growth is greatly hamper-
ed by the inability in the Boston
area for the technicians to go to
night school and work their way.
into professional status.
"Boston is the only major met-
ropolitan area where a break exists
in the technical training programs
that require taking leave from the
job or quitting," he said.
He also saw Southern Califor-
nia, especially in the Los Angeles
and San Diego areas, as a center
of research.
Views Motivations
Prof. Meier sees a combination
of aircraft development on the
West Coast, the climate, and the
attraction of "cosmopolitan cul-
ture" as the main motivating
forces behind research in this
area.
He noted that a tremendous pool
of technical personnel has grown
up there, enabling scientists to
group and re-group as contracts
end, as new contracts come and
as they get better job offers.
"Research engineers in the West
Los Angeles and San Diego areas
are always confident that jobs
will be opening up with commut-
ing distance as the present con-
tract draws to an end," he said,
commeting on both the mobility
and automobile orientation of the
culture.
New York Facilities
Prof. Meier also mentioned the
development of research facilities
in the New York City area.
"On its fringes, in Nutley, Bound
Brook, Summit, White Plains, New
Rochelle, Hicksville and Mineola,
the equivalent of several Route
128's will be found.
Overall, Prof. Meier noted that,
"Technological innovation - the
reduction to practice of an in-
vention on a commercial scale -
seems to be most closely associated
with social environments that' are
experiencing economic growth,
and the latter is consistently link-
ed to the growth of cities, of man-
ufacturing, and particularly of ser-
vices."
COEDS:
the 1961 flattering,
new hair-dos
are in our window
See them at your convenience !
- No appointments needed -
The Doscolo Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

Restrict Emancipation
The South at the close of the
war was a spiritual and political
vacuum, he said. Government con-
trol was retained in federal hands
because it was obvious that if the
Southerners were immediately re-
turned tocontrol of their own
local and state governments they
would do all in their power to re-
strict emancipation to its legal
implications only.
The slave holders were forced to
accept abolition of the institu-
tion, but would never admit that
it had been an evil or abandon
the psychological basis-inferior-
ity of the Negro-on which it
rested.
Far from being extreme, Prof.
Dumond -maintained the recon-
struction governments proved to
be totally inadequate because they
operated on the basis of "faith,
hope and charity" with too little
realism.
The so-called "freedman's bu-
To Show Films
On Civil War
The motion pictures "The Red
Badge of Courage" and "The True
History of the Civil War" will be
shown under the auspices of the
Summer Session at 4 p.m. and
again at 7 p.m. today in the Multi-
purpose Room of the Undergradu-
ate Library.
A lecture and a panel discus-
sion tomorrow will mark the cli-
max of the session's lecture and
film series on the Civil War.
Prof. Arlin Turner, chairman of
the Duke University English de-
partment, will discuss "Southern
Literature in the Backwash of the
Civil War" at 4:15 p.m. in Aud. A.
A panel discussion will follow at
7:30 p.m. Participants will include
moderator James H. Robertson,
associate dean of the literary col-
lege, Prof. Turner, and Profes-
sors Robert F. Haugh and Marvin
Felheim, both of the English de-
partment.
City Broadens
Aid Provisions
The City Council Tuesday night
authorized Ann Arbor's fire chief
to broaden existing mutual aid
agreements with area governments
by permitting localities to desig-
nate an assistant who can call for
city help.
Only the chief can make such a
request now.
The ordinance was proposed to
clarify the city's position and make
the procedures for mutual aid
more formal by the authorization
of an ordinance rather than a
resolution.
Under the ordinance, an assis-
tant designated by the fire chief
could make the call for help in
the absence of the chief when the
township department could not
handle a fire or natural disaster.

"Instead, the Southerners, en-
trusted with the Negro's newly
won freedom, began to institute
the unabashed segregation rooted
in Southern tradition today," he
said.
Nevertheless, Prof. Dumond ob-
served that 'we have reason now
for hope" that when the creative
powers of an oppressed people
finally burst forth, "the memory
of the boys who died ... will some-
how counterbalance the memories
of slavery and postwar tyranny."
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 2)
grads interested in management train-
ing program in financial field.
Kalamazoo Public Schools, Kalama-
zoo, Mich - Physical Therapist at Har-
old Upjohn School. Prefer recent grad
who possesses at least a BS and who
is registered physical therapist. Since
work is with school age children, teach-
ing exper. or trng. would be help-
ful. Paid on*basis of teachers' salary
during school year.
Proctor & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio
-Technical~ and business openings for
grads in Engrg., Chem, Mktg., Electron-
io Data Processing, and Ben'1. Bus.
Ad. Also, openings for WOMAN grad
as Library Chemist, (reading knowl-
edge of German, French, or Spanish
essential). All degree levels. Related
exper. helpful but not necessary.
Detroit Cvi Service-Staff Nurses-
to be in charge of assigned nursing
section. Graduate nurse with related
professional experience, preferabiy part
of which has been in supervisory ca-
pacity. Must be registered in Mich. or
eligible to obtain such registration.
Please contact Gen' Div. of Bureau of
Appointments, 3200 S.A.B., Ext. 3544,
for further information.
Part-Time
Employment
The following part-time jobs are
available. Applications can be made in
3200 SAB Monday through Friday, 8:00
am. to 12:30 p.m.
Employers desirous of hiring part-
time or temporary employes should con-
tact Jack Larde at NO 3-1511, Ext.
3553.
Students desiring miscellaneous jobs
should consult the bulletin board in
Rm. 3200, daily.
MALE
2 Salesmen, selling magazine sub-
scriptions, commission basis.
18 Psyxhologica subjects, several one-
hour experiments.
3 Salesmen, commission basis must
have car.
3 Salesmen, commission or salary
basis.
1 Reliable person, to pick up boy from
school at 11:30 a.m. Monday thru
Friday, other odd jobs til 1 p.m.,
must have car.
FEMALE
1 Good typist, ability to work with
figures full-time rest of summer,
then 20 hours per week permanent.
1 Stenographer, 20 hours per week,
for one month.
1 Technical typist, electric type-
writer.
1 Manuscript typist, full-time for two
weeks.
1 Read-questions to blind Law stu-
dent taking Bar Exam first week of
September.
1 Stenographer, 2-3 afternoons per
week, permanent position.
1 Reliable person, to pick up boy
from school at 11:30 a.m. Monday
thru Friday, other odd jobs til 1
p.m. Must have car.
1 Travel with family on vacation,
care for' children during the day,
swimming and driving helpful.

Dial
2-6264

.- -TE
* THURSDAY *

ENDS TODAY
"SNOW WHITE and
THE THREE STOOGES"

-Daily-Edward Langs
WOMENS HOUSING - 420 women students will live in these
proposed co-op houses slated for an Oxford Road site. Preliminary
plans have been completed and approved by the Housing and
Home Finance Agency and a reservation of funds has& been made
for these buildings.
Tomorrow at 7:30 P.M. at H ILLE L
INFORMAL PROGRAM
Dancing-Taped Panel of "Job and 'J.B.'
Prof. Marvin Felheim--Dr. William Baker
Thursday, August 3-1429 Hill St.

The greatest high adventure ever flmed!
ANIIONY QUINN
H*SEE, IT FROM
1000 QMSOF ** THE BEG NN NG

S

.. . .....

STANLEY BAKER " ANTHONY ( OAYLE" IRENE PAPAS " GIA SCALA
..[JAMESPDARREN-lease Note:
4 shows daily at 1:00,
3:30, 6:15 and 9:05
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Organization
Notices

A man's best friend on campus is the
SUMMER STUDENT DI RECTORY

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation, Dancing
and Taped Recording "Job and J.B.",
Dr. Felheim-Rev. Baker, Tomorrow,
Aug. 3, 7:30 p.m., Hillel Foundation.

-

i

"Master's touch -all of
Bergman's extraordinary
talents are on display.
Dreams' is a beautifully
constructed composition.",
-Newsweek
"Bergman has seldom
said anything in a more
vicrous and suitable

1967 Shirt and Skirt
100 Belt
TALK ABOUT COLOR! Miss Pat turns her
palette over to you now that it's time for
dark cottons. This two-piece self-ironing
Belfast cotton is yours in a slim lined
skirt that's cut on the bias . . . in a raglan
roll sleeve shirt with convertible collar.
A marshmallow contour belt matches your color
choice. Choose from red pepper, hunter
green, hot mustard, eggplant, teal, cinnamon

I

I

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