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August 02, 1961 - Image 4

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1961-08-02

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WFVFRA Vt A TfTCTQTI> 1091flE

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Miller: I'm Not a Pitcher

BOSTON (R) - Stu Miller, a
little guy with a monstrous curve,
turned to baseball by default.
Fans continued today to buzz'
about that right-handed pitcher
from the San Francisco Giantsj
who for both 1961 All-Star games
sent American League batters away
from the plate talking to them-
selves.
In Monday's rain-stopped 1-1
tie, the 165-pounder struck out
Mickey Mantle, Elston Howard
and pinch hitter Roy Sievers in
order with the potential winning
run on base.
Miller, 33, currently is a resident
of San Mateo, Calif., though he
grew up in Northhampton, Mass.
Stu says his entry into baseball
"is almost like a fairy tale.".,
"I didn't play high school base-
ball, just on the sandlots," Miller
says. "I was mostly a catcher. But
I could throw a curve."
Miller said when he came home
after . service in 1949, "I didn't
have any idea of playing ball for
a living."
"I read where the St. Louis
Cardinals were goiny to have a
tryout camp in Northhampton,"
Miller explains. "I didn't have a
job. So I decided to go for the
heck of it."
"I pitched for two or three days
and this scout came over and
asked me if I'd like to play pro
ball. So I said okay. I didn't have
ABL Heads
Set Games
CHICAGO (M)-Officials of all
eight clubs of the American Bas-
ketball League will open three
days of meetings today to draw up
schedules and rules for the new
professional league.
Presiding as commissioner of
the meetings will be Abe Saper-
stein, who also owns the league's
Chicago Majors entry. The other
teams in the league are the Pitts-
burgh Rens, Washington (D.C.)
Caps, Cleveland Pipers, Kansas
City Steers, Los Angeles Jets, San
Francisco Saints and Hawaii
Chiefs.
The owners, coaches and busi-
ness managers hope to draft the
league schedule, adopt playing
rules which reportedly include
several innovations, name a chief
referee, name playing sites and
ratify each team's contract list
of players.

anything better to do. They ship-
pedme to Salisbury in the Eastern,
Shore League and I've been in
baseball ever since.
"My best pitch is a changeup on
the curve. Vedie Himsl, the Chi-
cago Cubs' coach who managed,
me in class D in 1950, taught it
to me. I've known how to throw
a half-baked curve since I was
16. But changing speeds gave me
what success I have now." {
In his first All-Star appearance
at San Francisco July 11, Miller#
wound up the winning pitcher. His
All-Star totals read 4% innings,+
1 unearned run, 1 hit, 1 walk, 9
strikeouts and an earned run ave-
earge of 0.00.j
For the season, Miller has ap-1
peared in 39 games strickly in re-
lief, has worked 73 innings, given'
up 53 hits, walked 19, struck out
54 with an 8-3 record and a 2.71
ERA. He led the National LeagueI
with a 2.47 ERA in 1958 despite a
6-9 record.,

Miller's catcher, Ed Bailey, says
of Stu: "He has control and vary-
ing speeds, none fast. He drives
those sluggers wild."
"I'm probably more effective
against guys trying to hit the ball
out of the park," Miller agrees.
After watching Miller work here
Monday, Boston coach Rudy York
made this observation:
"Miller throws the ball slow and
his body fast. So the batters swing
at the delivery and not at the
ball. -He's the first to do it so
effectively since Schoolboy Rowe."
Mantle said after the game he
had been warned of the slow curve
facing Miller "but I never ex-
pected anything that slow. It felt,
like I waited an hour for it and
was still way out in front."
"Let 'em laugh at the junk
Miller throws," said Milwaukee
third baseman Eddie Mathews. "It
just happens that nobody in our
league likes to hit against him."

DODGERS ON TOP:
Alston Wary in NL Race;
Honk Suspended with Fine
4- ----

A

Douglas Leads Netmen;
Glasgow Wins by Upset

DODGER POWER-In spite of having very good players like
Norm Larker (above,sliding), Frank Howard (signaling), Maury
Wills, and Wally Moon, Walt Alston is still not ready to take
over complete control of the pennant race.
PGA CHAMP:
Wall Stays
waFrom_ Golf Open _

PITTSBURGH ,P) -- Los An-I
geles manager Walter Alston, a
veteran of tight National League
races, doesn't plan any pennant-r
winning celebrations just yet.
"We feel good about being in!
first place, but nobody knows if
we'll stay up there," Alston said
after the Dodgers whipped Pitts-
burgh Sunday for their eighth
straight victory.
The triumph, coupled with aI
Cincinnati-Chicago split of a
doubleheader, gave the Dodgers a
half-game lead over the second-
place Reds.
"I've never made any predic-
tions, and this is a bad time to4
start making them," Alston said.-
"We'll just go along as we have
been doing. We'll play them one atS
a time."
Alston even foresees a closer1
race than the one currently be-
ing waged in the league. He said:
"I think it can get tighter than
it is. The Giants and Braves have
been playing good ball. They're
further out, but it may get tight-
er as we go along."
The Dodger skipper went so far
as to say the defending world
champion Pirates still could cause
trouble The Pirates are 13%/
games out.
"We caught them in a little1
slump," Alston said. "They hit the
ball well in this series but right
at somebody most of the time.
When a team's in a slump, it has
some bad luck."
Discussing the recent perform-
ance that shot the 1959 cham-
pions into first place, Alston said
no one player can be cited as the
star.
"This is the best streak we've
had in a long time," he said, "but
it's been a team effort. One day
it's (Duke) Snider; the next day
it's (Wally) Moon. Then Tommy
Davis. It's been spread around.

(Norm) Larker hit a grand
slam home run the other day.
Then (Gil) Hodges went four for'
four. Everyone on the team has
had a part in it."
* * *
Houk Suspended
BOSTON QP)--Manager Ralph
Houk of the New York Yankees
received a five-day suspension
and a $250 fine yesterday for a
ruckus with the umpires during a
doubleheader with Baltimore last
sunday.
The fine and suspension were
imposed by American League pres-
ident Joe Cronin. Houk's suspen-
sion will start today when the
Yankees play a doubleheader with
Kansas City in New York and
wil continue through Aug. 6.
Houk, reached in New York,
had only this terse comment:
"I think it is a very tough pen-
alty for what I did "
Houk was ordered by Cronin not

to be in uniform once a ball game
begins and not to participate in
directing his team either directly
or indirectly while a game is in
progress.
During Sunday's doubleheader,
Houk was accused of brushing
umpire Ed Hurley in a dispute
over a called strike on a pitch
which retired Cletus Boyer.
Hurley said Houk "definitely
bumped me. I'll have to report it
ito the league."
Both Houk and Boyer thought
the pitch in question was low.
Boyer was called out on strikes.
At the time, the Yankees had
the bases loaded and nobody out.
All four umpires submitted re-
ports on the incident, Cronin said.
There have been two other ma-
jor suspensions in major league
baseball during the current sea-
son.
In April. Los Angeles Dodger
coach Leo Durocher was suspend-
ed for three days for a shin-kick-
ing hassle with an umpire, Jocko
Conlan, during a game with the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
At that time, National League
president Warren Giles wired Du-
rocher:
"I am sure you understand that
any kind of intentional body con-
tact with an umpire during an
argument is cause for suspension.
For such an offense during your
argument with umpire Conlan in
your game in Los Angeles, April
16 you are suspended three days,
April 17-19."
In a dispute over whether a ball
was foul or fair, the shin-kicking
episode resulted.
Los 'Angeles pitcher Don Drys-
dale was suspended five days and
fined $100 in July for throwing at
a batter The bean-ball contro-
versy involved Frank .Robinson of
the Cincinnati Reds during a
game in Los Angeles July 9.

SOUTHAMPTON, N.Y. (A') -
Top-seeded Jack Douglas, the
handsome Marine corporal from
Santa Monica, Calif., led the eight
seeded U.S. players yesterday in-
to the third round of the Meadow
Club Invitation Tennis Tourna-
ment.
Douglas, who won last week's
Pennsylvania Grass Court Cham-
pionships, rallied to oust Eugene
Scott of St. James, N.Y., 7-5, 6-2.
Douglas trailed 3-5 in the first
set, 0-2 in the second.
Second-seeded Jack Frost from
Monterrey, Calif., disposed of John
Hammill, South Africa, 3-6, 6-1,
6-1, and third - seeded Frank
Froehling the 19-year-old sensa-
tion from Coral Gables, Fla., stop-
ped John Karabasz, Miami, 7-5,
6-2
Dennis Ralston, the fourth-
seeded U.S. Davis Cupper from
Bakersfield, Calif., advanced, 6-4,
6-4 over Alphonse Ochoa, Mexi-
co. Fifth-seeded Ron Holmberg,
Brooklyn, N.Y., breezed by Roger
Werksman, Los Angeles, 6-1, 6-1.
Whitney Reed, sixth - seeded
from Alameda, Calif., survived a
7-5, 8-6 struggle with little
George Sokel, Haverford, Pa.
Seventh-seeded Ramsey Earn-
hart, Ventura, Calif., out-battled

Bob Siska, San Francisco, 6-4, 3-6,
6-2 and eight-seeded Chris Craw-
ford Piedmont, Calif., ousted Jim
McManus, San Francisco, 6-2, 4-6,
6-2.
Bob Mark, the top-seeded for-
eigner from Australia, won over
Ronnie Fisher, Houston, 6-3, 10-
12, 6-2.
PASADENA, Calif. () - Carla
Glasgow, unheralded 18-year-old
from nearby Whittier, upset Na-
tional Amateur champion Jo Anne
Gunderson of Seattle one up yes-
terday in the first round of the
Women's Western Golf Cham-
pionships.
Miss Glasgow, 18 day before
yesterday, playing in her first im-
portant tournament, was three
down at the turn. But she caught
the blonde ex-women's Western
Golf Association champion with
an eagle three on the 14th hole,
passed her on the 15th and held
on for the remarkable victory.
There were few if any other
upsets as the field of 64 played
the first round of match play at
the Annandale Golf Club.
Another former national cham-
pion from- Seattle, Mrs Anne
Quasp Decker, defeated Sandra
Palmer of Fort Worth, 2 and 1.

BALTIMORE (AP-Art Wall yes-
terday withdrew from the $35,000
Eastern Open Golf Tournament to
be held Thursday through Sunday
at Pine Ridge Course.
Wall notified tournament offici-
als of his withdrawal by telegram
from his home at Honesdale, Pa.
At his home, Wall said he was
"completely exhausted."
"I played two rounds Sunday
in the PGA and played in a pro-
am early Monday morning," he
said. "That's 54 holes in less than
24 hours."
Major League
Standings

AMERICAN
New York
Detroit
Baltimore
Cleveland
Chicago
Boston
Washington
Minnesota
Los Angeles
Kansas City

LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
65 36 .644 -
64 38 .628 1z1
58 46 .558 8?
55 49 .529 11%
51 53 .490 l51,,
47 58 .448 20
45 56 .446 20
45 56 .446 20
45 57 .441 201A
37 63 .370 2 7''

Wall, who returned to the cir-
cuit last week after being laid off
a month while he recovered from
a groin injury, said his doctor had
warned that he might reinjure
himself if he became too tired.
Wall's withdrawal leaves two
members of the newly named Ry-
der Cup team in the Eastern Open.
They are Bill Collins and Gene
Littler.
Among the early arrivals, Jackie
Burke was injured today during a
practice round at the tournament
site. Burke was struck in the face
with a driver when he walked be-
hind Tony Lema as Lema was
about to hit a drive off the first
tee. Burke - was taken to Union
Memorial Hospital where six
stitches were needed to close the
cut in his chin. He later returned
to the course.
A $3,500 pro-amateur tourna-
ment tomorrow will serve many
of the pros as a practice round for
the Eastern.
Among those due for tomorrow's
play are Doug Sanders, Julius
Boros, Bob Goalby, Ken Venturi,
Dave Ragan, Pete Cooper, Jacke
Burke, Ted Kroll, Lionel Hebert,
Doug Ford, Johnny Pott and Bob
Rosburg.
BILLIARDS
and
SWIMMING
daily except Sunday
at the
MICHIGAN UNION
Read the Classifieds

cp

A

RALPH HOUK .
... suspended

Eagles Favored by 1
In Tilt wth College,

CHICAGO ) - The heavy
work is over but the tough job is
ahead for the college All-Stars
who meet the Philadelphia Eagles
Friday night in the annual All-
Star football game in Soldier
Field. -
The National Football League
champions are two touchdown
favorites over the collegians but
many believe this Ali-Star team,
which plans to employ a pro-type
attack, has an excellent chance
to defeat the Eagles.
Speed, size and talent is plent-
iful in the All-Star camp. But
experience is the professionals'
forte.
The pros hold a 17-8 edge in the
colorful classic with two games.
ending in ties..
The All-Stars, coached by Otto
Graham, had their first taste of
professional competition last week
in a scrimmage against the Chi-
cago Bears in Rensselaer, Ind.
The All-Stars battled the Bears
to a 14-14 tie.
George Halas, owner-coach of
the Bears, called the collegians
the best All-Star squad he has
seen in the last 11 years.
One factor in the All-Stars'
favor is that the Eagles will not
be operating with the same quar-
tererback who led them to the
NFL. title. Norm Van Brocklin,
retired at the end of the season
and is coaching the Minnesota
Vikings.
Sonny Jurgensen has been
groomed to replace Van Brocklin
but reports from the Eagle camp
in Hershey, Pa., are that Jurgen-
sen has failed to live up to ex-
pectations. King Hill, late of the
St. Louis Cardinals, might be at
the controls for the Eagles Fri-
day.
Graham has at his disposal
three capable quarterbacks in Bill
Kilmer of UCLA, Norm Snead of
Wake Forest and Tom Matte of
Ohio State. This trio will throw
passes to a speedy group of ends
and halfbacks who include Joe
Bellino of Navy, Mike Ditka . of
Pitt, John Brewer of Mississippi
and El Kimbrough of Northwes-
tern.
End Ditka of Pitt and Line-
backer Emil Holub of Texas Tech
were named co-captains.
Ditka will lead the offense and
Holub the defense. The two were

Ditka and Holub are both out-
standing professional prospects.
Ditka was the Chicago Bears No.
1 draft choice and Holub already
has signed to play with the Dallas
Texans of the American Football
League.
The stars, however, will have to
provide protection for their of-
fense, and Graham has gone all
out this year to match the pros in
size. Nearly half of the 56-man
squad is made up of players weigh-

4 Points
All-S tars
ing between 230 and 285 pounds.
Last year the All-Stars lost to
Baltimore, 32-7. In that game, the1
collegians failed to give the passer
sufficient protection and the de-
fensive linemen were unable to
break into the Colts' backfield and
upset Johnny Unitas' passing
game. Things could be different
this year.
The game will draw a crowd of
around 65,000. It will be televised
nationally via ABC at 9 p.m. EST.

NATIONAL
Los Angeles
Cincinnati
San Francisco
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
St. Louis
Chicago
Philadelphia
TODAY'S

LEAGUE
W L Pct.
62 38-.620
63 40 .612
54 46 .540
50 48 .510
45 48 .484
47 52 .475
43 56 .434
30 66 .313
GAMES

TODAY'S GAMES
Washington at Detroit (2-TN)
Kansas City at New York (2)
Minnesota at Baltimore (2-TN)
Chicago at Cleveland (2-TN)
Los Angeles at Boston (2)

GB
~1
8
it
13?-
141
1811
30

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES
C-TED STANDARD SERVICE
Friendly service is our business.
Atlas tires, batteries and accessories.I
Complete A'ltomotive Service-All
products and services guaranteed.
Road Service
"You expect more from Standard
and you get it."
1220 South University
NO 8-9168
81
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
Phone NO 3-4858

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
SPECIAL
SIX-DAY
LINES ONE-DAY RATE
2 .70 .58
3 .85 .70
4 1.00 .83
Figure 5 average words to a line
Call Classified between 1 :00 and 3:00 Mon. thru Fri.
Phone NO 2-4786

San Francisco at Los Angeles (N)
Milwaukee at Chicago (2)
Pittsburgh at St. Louis (N)
Philadelphia at Cincinnati (2-TN)

SLACK PANTS

SPECIAL
GROUP
one low price

1

HENRY H.
STEVENS, Inc.
LONG
DISTANCE
MOVING
1273 Broadway Bill
Flint 6, Michigan Stevens
one Collect Lit. '40
nt CEdar 4-1686 Managei

WASH 'N WEAR
IVYS, DACS
CORDS, PIN CORDS

*A" c

77

our reg. $4.95

SPORT 99c and $150
SHIRTS

I

Pha
FHim

For Lower Free Estimates 1.)
Interstate Rates Every Friday
We own, operate, schedule and dispatch our own fleet of vans
for better direct service without transfer.

SAMES STORE
122 E. Washington St.

HaIm

S7
EMPLOYMENT WANTED
WANTED-Baby-sitting jobs. Reliable
woman with own transportation. Call
NO 3-0338.
FOR SALE
WIDE-ANGLE and telephoto lenses for
a Contaflex II camera. GR 9-3702, toll
free. B14
1956 SPORTSMAN mobile home, 33 ft.
by 8 ft. $1600. Ideal for couple. Full
bath. Clean. NO 3-4016 or HIckory 9-
2306. B13
BY OWNER, will sacrifice: 2-bedroom
ranch, oak floors, storms and screens,
garage, fenced yard. Located at 1126
Hawthorne, Ypsilanti. Key at 1040
Olivia, Ann Arbor. Terms available.
No reasonable offer will be refused.
Reply Box 104, Michigan Daily. B12
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
A-1 New and Used Instruments}
BANJOS, GUITARS and BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington NO 2-1834
X3
Preview of Grinnell's
PIANO FESTIVAL SALE
Come in any day
and see these tremendous
values from $399 up.
GRINNELL'S
323 S. Main NO 2-5667
the home of Steinway pianos
X2
BARGAIN CORNER
SUMMER SPECIALS: Men's Wear: short
sleeve sport shirts 99c & $1.50; knit
sport shirts $1.44; wash-n-wear slacks
2.77; many other big buys-Sam's
Store, 122 E. Washington. W2

BUSINESS SERVICES
SUSTERKA
LAKE
Private swimming parties
Hall rental
Hayride and pizzaride
Horseback riding daily

Call DON BASTEDO,
HU 3-5010,
CAMPUS
OPTICIANS
Most frames replaced
while you wait.
Brokenlenses duplicated
FAST service on all repairs.

J19

TRANSPORTATION
RIDE WANTED to Atlanta, Georgia, on
August 17. Will share driving and gas
costs. Phone 663-7024. G5
HELP WAN]ED
TWO WOMEN NEEDED for telephone
work in downtown office of local dry
cleaners. Interesting work. Guaran-
teed salary. Two shifts available. Tel.
NO 2-9546. H16
TYPIST two afternoons per week. In-
dependent real estate office. $1.75 per
hour. Sales people also needed. Com-
mission only. Prefer experienced per-
son. Call NO 3-9373. H14
STUDENTS: Here's an opportunity to
turn your sales ability into money.
Taking subscriptions for the Ann Ar-
bar Digest is profitable-very profit-
able Miss Dean will tell you all
about it. Phone NO 3-8838. H15
BIKES and SCOOTERS
BOY'S BIKE-J. C. Higgins Ingl&fl-
built. $20. Call NO 2-4736.
FOR RENT
Ann Arbor's
FINEST
Apartments
at
Moderate
Rentals
Schedule of Rentals:
Studio................$ 98 to 126
1-Bedroom .............. 120 to 180
2-Bedroom..............225 to 270
3-Bedroom..............270 to 330
(including heat, water, Prigi-
daire range and refrigerator,
swimming pool)
Modes open 11 am. to 8 p.m. daily
and Sunday. Immediate occupancy.
2200 Fuller Road.
HURON
TOWERS

r

240 NICKELS ARCADE
NO 2-9116 NO 8-6019
J3
Shopping at RALPH'S MARKET
is never rained out-
Ralph's is open every night till 12!
MEATS
SPECIALTIES
KITCHEN UTENSILS
Ralph has a roof over his head- £
at 709 Packard
JOa
DATA PROCESSING of all kinds per-
formed. Programming, statistical an-
alysis, and consulting. Call NO 5-6713.
J18
STUDENTS: Neat, expert typing of your
papers, etc., pickup and delivery in
Ann Arbor. Electric typewriter. Call
GL 3-6258. J6
USED CARS

JIM WHITE CHEVROLET
USED CARS
1960 CADILLAC, 62 two-door coupe,
full power. ' beige with rmatch-

I

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