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July 16, 1964 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1964-07-16

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X h !igian (l
Seventy-Third Yevr
EbrrED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIYERSITY OF MIC MGA
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
ere Opinions Are Free STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG., ANN ARBOR, MICH., PHONE NO 2-3241
Troth Will Prevail"
Editorials printed in T he Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.

"We Stand Upon Our Historic Principles -

TODAY AND TOMORROW
GOP Insiders' Expect
Party Control, Not Win

DAY, JULY 16;1964;

NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT HIPPLER

Police Stickers:
The Implications

'HE WHOLE POLICE stickers issue
~ could be a huge tempest in an insig-
ificant teapot.
For who-except possibly criminals-
an argue with a three inch square piece
f paper that says "Support Your Local
olice?" And so what if the stickers are
art of a national John Birch Society
impaign? Maybe George Lemble, presi-
ent of the Washtenaw County Conserva-
ves, who donated the stickers to the
ity, is right. Maybe the Birch Society is
.nally doing a "good thing."
At second glance, however, the matter
not quite so simple. First of all, there
the question of the honesty of the
onservatives. Lemble was unaware of
ae origin of the stickers; he did not
ven know from whom they had been ob-
ained.
7ET THERE CAN BE no question that
the design for the stickers, if not the
etual pieces of paper, originated in
irch headquarters in Belmont, Mass.
laybe the specific stickers now adorn-
g city store windows were printed some-
lace else. But the Birch Society bulle-
in quoted in yesterday's paper carries a
lear replica of the stickers. And at the
ottom of the bulletin the reader is told
aat he can order them from Belmont, 50
>r one dollar, postpaid.
It is hard to believe that no one in
ae Conservatives knew this. It's hard
> believe that their donation is any-
aing other than an attempt by the or-
anization to pull the wool over the eyes
f the cit fathers.
But that claim raises the second and
iore important question: what wool?
aren't the stickers innocuous? Would
heir meaning have been at all question-
ble if various Council members hadn't
rought the Birch link to the city's at-
ontion?
HE CRUX of the matter is that the
stickers would not have been ques-
onable. The meaning would have been
uite clear: support your local police-
.o matter what they do, without question.
ven if people didn't think in terms of
acking the lawmen in their vigil against
ommunist-inspired racial riots, there
rould still be an appeal to unthinking
tipport. ?
And that's exactly what makes the
bickers so insidious. As Robert Weeks,
ouncilman and professor, puts it, "the
olice deserve more generous financial
Editorial Staff
ENNETH WINTER C.. . ........00-Editor
DWARDHBER STEIN..............o-Editor
[ARY LOU BUTCHER...........Associate Editor
HARLES TOWLE............... Sports Editor
EFFREY GOODMAN '............... Night Editor
OBERT RIPPLER ................. Night Editor
AURENCE KIRSHBAUM ...........Night Editor
Business Staff
TDNEY PAUIKER,. ............. Business Manager
Y' WELLMAN... . ......Supplement Manager
UTH SCHEMNITZ..........circulation Manager
ETER DODGE.........Assistant Business Manager
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
se of all news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
edited to the newspaper. All rights of re-publication
all1 other matters here are also reserved.
The Daily is a member of the Associated Press and
cllegiate Press Service.
Published daily Tuesday through Saturday morning.
ammer subscription rates $2 by carrier, $2.50 by mail.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mich.

support than they have received in the
past ... They also should have the kind
of support a law-abiding citizenry gives
its police through observance of the law.
"But the public should not be asked to
give its unqualified, blanket support. If
the police overstep their authority, if in
their zeal to enforce the law they ignore
a citizen's rights, they should be criticiz-
ed, not supported ... Like a city council-
man, a policeman should be respected,
but no one should be encouraged to sup-
port him uncritically, irrespective of what
he does."
THlEBIRCH STICKERS obscure all of
this. They exert a subtle psychological
effect upon the citizen who sees them.
Even more subtle, they create an artifi-
cial situation in which anyone who does
not have a sticker on his car or store
window is, by direct implication, against
the police.
Such a simple-minded approach, using
the subtlest of Red-baiting, psychologi-
cal tricks, is typical of the extreme right.
The tactic was its fundamental tool in
the McCarthy era: if you refused to an-
swer questions about Communist affilia-
tion, even if you didn't come out flatly
in favor of the hearings (or of the House
Un-American Activities Committee hear-
ings these days) then obviously you were
a Communist. What else?
A great deal else. Especially now, when
there is some question about police tac-
tics in dealing with Ann Arbor Negroes.
What the city sticker campaign amounts
to is official endorsement of one side of
a controversy. City officials are, of course,
free to take sides, but they do this as
individual men and individual officials.
But it is ethically quite questionable for
a corporate body composed of differing
camps to align itself with only one of
those camps-and the implied alignment
is with opposition to the Police Review
Boards 4 currently being discussed in
Council.
A GREAT DEAL ELSE. For the police
are both public servants - which
means that they supposedly serve the
people and not vice versa-and men -
which means that they are prone to the
same influences which can make all sorts
of men do things that justly deserve cri-
ticism.
A great deal else. People in this coun-
try have always believed that free ex-
pression of opinion and reaction is the
best means of arriving at satisfactory
policies. Only wilful propaganda cam-
paigns have made them drop their insist-
ence on frankness and give irrational, un-
thinking support to any cause, man, poli-
cy or institution. The Washtenaw Coun-
ty Conservatives will be the first to back
this statement, as they indicated Mon-
day in supporting an investigation of the
stickers.
Let them admit thesource of the
stickers publicly. And if they don't know,
let them explain carefully why they failed
to find out.
Not that such admission will make the
stickers excusable, though they speak for
themselves: they have no reasonable jus-
tification. It is good that the city has
taken them off City Hall and will settle
the matter. Just so the settlement is not
too quiet, for Ann Arbor citizens ought
to be aware of the many implications of
"Support Your Local Police."
-JEFFREY GOODMAN

96 'TOIP$

K?

CONSTRUCTION CRISIS
Higher Education Needs

By WALTER LIPPMANN
IT IS QUITE TRUE, as William
S. White has pointed out, that
we are witnessing "a violent and
fundamental power showdown be-
tween the inside and outside fac-
tions of the Republican Party."
The inside faction, which oon-
sists of all the top Republican
leaders in both houses of Con-
gress, is solidly behind Sen. Barry
Goldwater. The outside faction,
which includes governors like
Scranton, Rockefeller and Rom-
ney, is outside the inner Republi-
can congressional hierarchy.
These Republican insiders were
defeated in 1952 when their can-
didate, Sen. Robert Taft, was
beaten by the outsiders who used
Gen. Dwight Eisenhower as their
instrument.
THIS ANALYSIS, good as it is,
does not explain why Goldwater,
the 1964 instrument of the con-
servatives, is so radically different
in great matters from Senator
Taft.
In 1952, "Mr. Republican" was
still deeply opposed to foreign en-
tanglement, unwilling to engage
in military adventures abroad and
most reluctant to be drawn into
intervention outside of the West-
ern Hemishphere. His conservative
successor in 1964 has sounded the
trumpet for a global crusade to
be carried on by wide-ranging
military intervention, possibly nu-
clear.
How is it that the Republican
conservatives who are taking con-
trol of the national political or-
ganization seem to have changed
so radically in these 12 years? I
think of Sen. Everett Dirksen who,
still wearing the laurels he earned
by making possible the civil rights
act, has nominated Goldwater.
* * *,
I DO NOT THINK that Drksen
has any lust for a global crusade
or that it worries him very much
that Goldwater has said that the
civil rights act is unworkable and
can be enforced only by a police
state.
I do not think Dirksen has
changed. Presumably he believes
that Goldwater will not be elected,
that it is not important, there-
fore, what 'Goldwater says and
that when and if Goldwater is
defeated, the control of the party
will be left with the Republican
congressional hierarchy of which
he, Dirksen, is the leading mem-
ber.
With the platform, which is un-
alloyed Goldwater, before us, one
thing is certain. Goldwater is of-
fering the voters a choice between
himself and Lyndon Johnson, and
nobody will be able to say that
it is another case of Tweedle-Dum
and Tweedle-Dee.
* * *
THE FUNDAMENTAL difference
between the two men is not what
it would be if Dirksen were op-
posing Johnson, whether it is bet-
ter to do A or B about this or
that. The difference between Gold-
water and Johnson is one of tem-
perament and character-the dif-
ference between a passion to divide
and dominate and a passion to
pacify and harmonize.
A prime example of the dif-
ference is in the field of civil
rights-. Goldwater's stance, when
the bill was still before the Sen-
ate and now in the platform, is,
if not calculated to do so, most
surely bound to offer the Republi-
can Party as a haven of refuge
and support for nonobservance
and passive resistance. This is a
national calamity, that this grave
matter of civil rights is not to be

raised above the party conflict
and that Dirksen has to give way
to Goldwater.
And to what end? In order that
Goldwater, running for President,
may be able to attract the segre-
gationists who look to Gov. George
Wallace of Alabama. That is what
I mean by saying that Goldwater
has a passion to divide and to
dominate.
* * .
AND IF, by some chance, Gold-
water were elected President, we
should find that what he stands
for in foreign affairs would cause
nothing less than a convulsion in
our foreign relations.
His platform talks a b o u t
strengthening NATO and our
other alliances and about our
moral leadership in the world
against all forms of Communism.
But as surely as night follows
day, the election of Goldwater
would shatter our whole system of
alliances, and it would set rolling
in all the continents enormous
waves of anti-Americanism and of
neutralism. For none of our allies
in Europe or in Latin America or
in Asia, except perhaps Chiang
Kai-Shek, would join us in a
global, nuclear, anti-Communist
crusade.
Far from following the United
States in such a lunatic adventure,
the paramount concern of our
allies would be how to contain the
U.S. until It had recovered its
sanity.
(C),1964,The Washington Poet co.
LETTERS
A Danger
In Stickers00
To the Editor:
"QUPPORT Your Local Police"
reads the little blue and white
sticker on the door of the Ann
Arbor Police Department. Look
closely and you'll see the same
sticker on the windows of a few
Ann Arbor merchants; closer, and
find it on the bumpers of some of
the cars with "Goldwater '64"
stickers; closer, and you'll find
the slogan and the emblem head-
ing a leaflet issued by the John
Birch Society-the original source
of the slogan as well as the stick-
ers.
The police say the "Washtenaw
County Conservatives" supplies the
stickers. The merchants say they
"got them from the police." The
drivers of the cars with the
bumper stickers don't answer your
questions.
Now that National Police Week
is over, why this effort in Ann
Arbor? Has there been any threat
to the police here? A threat taken
seriously by the responsible mem-
bers of the community? or by the
police themselves? What kind of
support should the police receive?
Do they need money, more men,
fringe benefits, the moral support
of the community? Probably all
of thesethings are needed, but is
this the kind of support that is
requested by the little blue stick-
ers?:
* * *
I THINK NOT. Rather, is it
not an attempt to ally the police,
who are public employees of the
whole community, with a small
segment of this community that
is both politically irresponsible and
potentially dangerous?
-James McEvoy

By LAURENCE KIRSHBAUM
THE UNIVERSITY epitomizes
American education in many
ways. Its orientation: liberal arts;
its pursuit: research; and its goal:
a scholarly community, all repre-
sent what we call Higher Edu-
cation.
In its troubles, the University
is also representative of education.
Take any problem. Faculty sal-
aries, facilities, growth. Compute
the amount the University needs
annually to meet those problems.
Multiply that amount-nearly $40
million-times a large two-digit
number. Now you have what Amer-
ican education needs ideally.
Statisticians place the annual
figure at $4 billion. That, of course,
is the ideal.
- *
EDUCATORS here and nation-
ally know they must settle for less.
Their requests this coming year
will fall far short of what is
ideally needed. Private, state and
federal sources will allocate even
less than what educators seek.
The University is preparing
budget requests that will ask $30
million to meet the faculty sal-
ary, facility and growth needs.
The most chronic problem in
Michigan and in all states is
the construction crisis. Based on
enrollment projections, the Uni-
versity could use over $25 mil-
lion for building and remodeling.
The nation's colleges could use $2
billion.
FOR CONSTRUCTION, the Uni-
versity will seek about $15 mil-
lion. The nation's colleges will re-
quest only $1.5 billion.
In actual funds, the University
will be alloted about $7 million.
The nation's colleges will receive
$1.2 billion.
The University will thus slide
$17 million down the scale from
the ideal to the actual. The na-
;ion's colleges will be pegged down
$800 million.
THESE SUBTRACTIONS add
tip.
The figures represent a lot of
libraries and classrooms which
won't be built. They condemn the

educational process here to an in-
adequate economics building or a
pieced-together architecture and
design school.
Unlike the funds, students are
going to continue to gush forth.
Seven million degree-credit stu-
dents will clamor for a college ed-
ucation by 1970, where only four
million are knocking now. By
1975, 8.5 million will be seeking
admittance. The University's pro-
jected enrollment for 1975 is near-
ly double its present 28,000.
But growth is only one of the
crises arguing for financial rec-
ognition and rcorection. One group
:f observers-the Educational Fa-
cilities Laboratories--has issued a
report which adds fresh shades
to the construction problems.
* * *
THE REPORT warns that if fa-
cilities are inadequately provided
for too long, the needed build-
ings will be set up by a series
of "crash programs."
Campuses will be "crowded with
misplaced academic slums, educa-
tionally self-defeating and drain
both educationally and econom-
ically on future generations," the
report states.
In exposing this danger, the re-
port is picking up a familiar re-
frain of educators. They have
stressed that unless preventive
maintenance is used now to keep
facility deficiencies from increas-
ing, the future onslaught of stu-
dents will perpetuate- an even
greater crisis. Hasty constructions
will in turn give birth to even
greater problems.
WHAT IS BEING done? Presi-
dent Johnson managed to wran-
gle a $1.2 billion college facilities
act out, of the Congress last De-
cember. It would provide an aver-
age of $400 million each year for
construction. Hopefully, by loan
and matching fund gimmicks, the
act can be made to stimulate cap-
tal outlays by industry and state
governments.
The problem is that no funds
hiave actually been authorized yet.
the bill was supposed to become
operative in the last fiscal year,
which ended June 30, but civil

rights placed the fund authoriza-
tion bill in the Senate's backlog.'
This means that funds will be-
come available for this fiscal year,
but time-valuable in construction
-has been. lost. The University,
waiting to apply for library funds,
will have to be patient.
* * *
NEITHER the University, nor
American education, can afford a
luxury of time. That's why some
parts of the country are planning
right into the next generation.
At the University of Califor-
nia, Berkeley, a $270 million con-
struction project is under way. The
Los Angeles campus is gearing it-
self for the stretch run on a $370
million building program which
was begun in 1949.
In New York, the multi-branch-
d state university will invest $700
million to absorb a 100,000 stu-
ient population by 1970. The Uni-
-versity. of Illinois is spending $195
nillion to build new campuses,
one in Chicago.
These programs have a combi-
nation of foresightedness and
funds which will be instrumental
in the war on ignorance.
But the microcosm of education
is right here. The University pre-
pares to plod through another sub-
$10 million capital outlay year.
Too many other institutions, de-
spite their liberal arts, research
and scholarly communities, will
have programs which aren't mov-
ing any faster.

INSECT ANTICS
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ELEVEN young University Play-
ers unwrapped last evening for
a delighted opening-night audience
a happy pastiche of social satire
that brightened the. stage of Lydia
Mendelssohn Theatre. Sam Spe-
wack's Under the Sycamore Tree
provideddthe change of pace for
the Players' Summer program that
may prove their brightest offering
yet this season.
The play gives us a light and
witty, subterranean Animal Farm.
It is a cottage of serried snatches
from the history of a society of
ants, who, by means of the
achievements of their scientist and
a self-conscious mimicry of the
half-known world of humans,
achieve dubious results that mirror
closely the milestones of "prog-
ress" known to America in the
sixties.
Stephen Wyman is outstanding
in his leading role of the ant
scientist whose innovations bring
his anthill compatriots from the
state of primitive, foraging, im-
personal creaturees who naturally
devour their enemies, to the so-
phisticated level of anthropomor-
phic well-fed progressives who
eventually feel, love and - fret
about the eventual obsolescence
of war.

IT'S WALTZ in 3/4 ant-time as Julia Lacey and Stephen Wyman
(as the Queen and Scientist) introduce one more human custom
into their ant colony in UNDER THE SYCAMORE TREE, the
third University Players' summer offering. The production will run
nightly through Saturday at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

UP ON T 6

NEXr PAYI tRoT
U66RAM FROM

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WHAT
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I Aft

AR, i \v

mimicry into a more blatant, wise-
ornlririo n,.. r on~ntnmp. of nt he

uberance of the scientific heroes.
I4.h.p1 fuine'I z . .4~ a l Irftipmhd

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