100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

July 07, 1964 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1964

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PACE THREE

TUESDAY, JULY 7, 1964 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAIW TTTRKV!

ra.av sean...

f

CONTRACEPTIVES
Church Reviews Birth Policy

JOHNSON'S CONCERN

I

Appalachia: Land of Poverty

By EUGENE LEVIN
Associated Press Staff Writer
VATICAN CITY-The spirit of
Roman Catholic renewal and the
development of birth control pills
have led to a major review of
church policy on population
growth, but it may be months
before conclusions are announced.
Until then, Pope Paul VI has
confirmed the validity of exist-
ing rules and in effect quieted
what had been a growing debate
among some Roman Catholic prel-
ates and theologians about birth
control.
Vatican circles believe that ma-
jor result of the study will con-
cern oral contraceptive pills. The
basic church. position on birth
control is expected to remain un-
changed, with emphasis on im-
proving economic conditions, not
contraception.
Two Aspects
Vatican sources say theologians
and medical experts in many
countries are working on the mor-
al and practical aspects of the
problem.

The pope said June 23 the study
would be carried out "as broadly
and profoundly as possible" - an
indication that conclusions are
not likely to be announced soon.
His statement has had three
major effects:
The Effects
It has served to acknowledge
a demand among Roman Cath-
olics for clarification on hormone
pills.
It has tended to moderate pub-
lic discussion of birth control
among prelates and theologians
by meeting the demand for clari-
fication while reaffirming, for the
present, current policy.
And it has emphasized anew
the church's search for renewal
in the modern world.
No Mention
While Pope Paul's speech was
believed to refer especially to the
new pills, he did not specifically
mention them and he talked in
general terms, indicating a broad-
er review.
Some sources think the study
might also touch on Protestant

views on birth control, with the
hope of helping unity efforts by
examining points of difference.
Many Protestants accept contra-
ceptive measures rejected by Cath-
olics.
Last Christmas, Pope Paul de-
scribed artificial birth controls as
"remedies ... worse than the (pop-
ulation) problem itself."
Not Worthy
He added: "Instead of increas-
ing the supply of bread on the
dining table of this hunger-rid-
den world as modern techniques
of production can do today, some
are thinking in terms of diminish-
ing by illicit means the number of
those who eat with them. This is
unworthy of civilization."
In announcing his study, Pope
Paul was careful not to promise
changes. "Let us say frankly," he
declared, "that we have not yet
sufficient reasons to consider
overcome, and therefore not oblig-
atory, the rules given by Pope
Pius XII in this connection."
Regular Cycle
Debate on the pills is generally

By RICHARD F. NEXVCOM1I
appointed the President's Appala-I
Associated Press N cieaturcs W rilr chian Regional Commission (PA-!

Appalachia is a-strane p cc--
a huge pocket of poverty in the
heart of the world's rich st area.
It is the East's principal moun-
tain chain, and contains breat,-
taking vistas at every hand. It has
plenty of water-most of it foul-
and it supplies two-thirds of the
nation's coal.
It is a vast area-165,000 square
miles, ten times the size of Swit-
zerland-running from Erie, Pa.,
to Birmingham, Ala. And it con-
tains 15.3 million people-by and
large the poorest people in the
nation. Geographically, AppalachiaI
encompasses all of one state --
West Virginia-and parts of nine
others-Pennsylvania, Ohio, Vir-
ginia, Maryland, Kentucky, Ten-
nessee, North Carolina, Georgia
and Alabama. The eyes of the na-
tion are on it.
Discovered Poverty
President John F. Kennedy first
focused attention on Appalachia,
He discovered the depth of pov-
erty there when he was campaign-
ing for the presidency, and later

POPE PIUS XII

concerned with finding ways of
using them along with the rhythm
system to make that method more
certain. The pills, in addition to
controlling ovulation, help make
the menstrual cycle regular.
Most Roman Catholic authori-
ties, including Archbishop John
Heenan of Westminster (England)
and the Vatican Weekly L'Osser-
vatore Della Domenica, reject the
pills now on the market.

RC) . After the assassination, Pres-
ident Johnson ordered the com-
mission to continue its work. The
report of the commission, headed
by Franklin D. Roosevelt Jr. and
including representatives of the
tates in the region, presented a
stark picture of life in Appalachia.
It also recommended a long-range
federal-states program to cost bil-
lions of dollars.
President Johnson wasted no
Lime. He visited parts of Appala-
chia, talked with some of the peo-
ple there, and said these things:
He has declared "unconditional
war on poverty" and the goal is
"total victory." "We are not go-
ing to rest until unemployment is
out of date . . . in every American
city. For the first time in our
history an America without hun-
mer is a practical prospect, and
it must-it just simply must-be
done.'
Then he returned to Washing-
ton and four days later sent to
Congress a proposal to get the
kppalachia program under way
with "the urgency and the need
that is so plainly written on the
faces of Appalachian citizens."
First Request
For the first year, starting July
1, he asked $280 million. Main
features of the program are:
1) Highways-To open up the
blind valleys and passless ridges
of the mountain country.

APPALACHIA
Poverty Row

I I I . I I I I I . I k I

7-

60 decade, while it was increas-
ing 15 per cent in the rest of the
country.
Little Growth
Population went up 1.1 per cent,
while in the rest of the country
It was growing 20.4 per cent. All
economic indicators-retail sales,
automobile sales, spending on

_.

services--are far below the na-
tional averages.
To put it concretely: President
Johnson sat on the porch of a
ramshackle home near Inez, Ky.,
and talked with Tom Fletcher.
He's a sawmill operator with eight
children. Last year he made $400,
That's Appalachia.

1

{~}

World News Round(up
By The Associated Press
NICOSIA - Greek Premier George Papandreou has rejected;
President Lyndon B. Johnson's suggestion for Greek-Turkish talks
on the Cyprus issue, a Greek government spokesman said last night.
Papandreou s message re.b lin'.n. t. tA fJ41

TWO to get ready
for fall...
THE FELT JUMPER

over its own full-length
FOULARD SHIFT
This is the look that is
.. the double jumper!
Part one: long sleeve
cotton shift that may
be worn alone as
a classic
transitional.
Part two: a
wool-rayon felt
jumper that
doubles with

rag11UuVa 11utag,p 1Uiy11
week, is expected to be delivere
spokesman said in Athens.
* *
LEOPOLDVILLE-Once the s
announced yesterday he has bee
ment of national unity. But he
of the late Patrice Lumumba, a
Authorized
TRIUMPH Dealer
Sales, Service & Partsr
HERB ESTES
AUTOMART
319 W. Huron
665-3688

ng Loa reqest nom jonnson~ last 2) Flood and Water Projects-
d to the White House today, the In flood times the rivers devas-
tate the towns in the narrow
* *mountain valleys. At all times the
ymbol of secession, Moise Tshombe streams are polluted by acid leak-
n asked to form a Congo govern- age from the mines and lack of
faced a challenge from following sewage facilities.
Communist favorite when he was 3) Timber and Mine Improve-
4premier. Since his return from anent-The two great resources of
voluntary exile, the former seces- the area have been steadily ex-
ported, without sufficient benefit
sionist president of rich Katanga to the area. The long-range plan
province has worked hard to get is to develop uses of these mater-
the support of the Lumumbists. ials within Appalachia - timber
* * *processing and manufacture, and
SAIGON - Fighting with their the use of coal for power and
backs to flaming barracks, 300 chemical products.
government troops beat off waves 4) Agriculture-Farming has de-
of Communist Viet Cong guer- clined sharply in the area. The
rillas making a savage assault plan is to switch to pasturage de-
yesterday on a United States spe- velopment for cattle and dairy
cial forces camp in the central farming where feasible.
highlands, amn hr esbe
*ihlnd.The magnitude of the problem is
NEW YORK-American Tele- told in a few statistics: Tubercu-
phone and Telegraph rising to a ilosis is 50 per cent higher in

III

.4
~ s
00- ' Vt
(N I,
s " ye;4 r rf3
Al.-- I \
~ at V
.1000
.'~$,-;
Hill~
-MTRPOIANARA fJo
,,crr t.

j

t-

u

I

I

k I

E

blouses, too.

Gold or blue. Sizes 5 to 15.

Not shown: double-breasted jumper
set, in green or grey.
The two-piece ensemble, 17.98
-aoso~

C

---0
D ?
AUSTIN
DIAMOND
CORPORATION

I

Discount Records Inc.
SUMMER SPECIALS
ALL
VERVE and
WESTMI NSTER

I

new all-time peak, led the stock
market in a mild advance yester-
day. In the Dow-Jones Averages,
65 stocks were up .83, 15 utilities
were up .51, 20 railroads were up
.77, and 30 industrials were up
1.83 to a closing average of 843.30.

Appalachia than in the rest of the
country.
In some rural counties, 60 per
cent of the children do not fin-
ish the eighth grade.
Employment in Appalachia de-
:lined 1.5 per cent in the 1950-

_r E f yArea
!'°d: r : tt t;Ir-.: ' t',; f C'.- '
" ' st\rlr~ +! -/ ot:'rJ:! "-" r_ s : ,t' "'
!_leiitr 1'rt lf F. t
AP Newsfeatutes

LP'S
reg. $5.98-$3.59

OFF
reg. $4.98-$2.99

I

1209 S. University

663-7151

Including-
Stan Getz, Osccr Potorson, Gerry Mulligan, Count
Basie, Jimmy Smith, Bill Evans, Ella Fitzgerald,
Anita O'Day, Cal Tjader, Julian Bream, & West-
minster Collector's Series.
Plus many others
3iscount records,
300 S. State (corner Liberty) 665-3679
SUMMER HOURS:
Man. & Fri. 9:30 to 9--Tues., Wed., Thurs., Sat. 9:30-6

...........A. A

:: .

For the first time!
All you could ask of nature
you get in a

I
3
I
==
I

1/4
/ .,.
}

. tij .. "Q
Stretchbra~
by

Now the loveliest deollet6
bra in the world-the famous
Bali-lo - has been adapted
for small figures ! A lighter-
than-air push-up foam pad
lifts the small or soft-tissue
bosom to the front and cen-
ter, producing full, femi-
nine cleavage, rounded and
real. The pad replaces flesh
that would normally fill the
undercup and sides. Use
what nature gave you to

amazing support and com-
fort. White or black, 32 to
36. A and B cup sizes, 6.95.

x :; :

...........: ::?i4

.k< t

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan