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July 07, 1964 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1964-07-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. JULY 7, 1964

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILI TUESDAY. JULY 7,1964

RESEARCH GRANTS
To Study Growth, Radiation

Computers'W
tl Y lF ' i d 1f .L

The biological effects of low-
level radiation, the use of radio-t
active flourine to study bone
growth, and how pure super-pure
materials truly are, comprise
three investigations supported by
the newest Phoenix Project re-t
search grants.
Grants totalingi$48,400 were c
made to 18 University faculty
members from the Michigan Me-t
morial-Phoenix Project, the Uni-
versity's privately supported pro-t
gram of investigations in peace-c
ful uses of atomic energy.z
While the effects of intensivet
radiation have been and are still1
being widely studied, little is
known about the long-term effects
of low-level radiation on livingt
systems.1
To Irradiate Virus
This is what Prof. Donald J. t
Merchant of the bacteriologydde-t
partment is studying with his1
Phoenix grant. He will irradiate,
with low levels of radiation aboutf
Set Tryouts
For 'Thurber'
The tryouts for "Thurber Car-
nival"-the fourth production of
the University Players Summeri
Playbill-will be held Thursday
and Friday of this week, July 9l
and 10.1
The James Thurber musical re-1
vue, directed by Prof. Nafe Katter1
of the speech department, will
open Wednesday, July 29 withi
performances through August 1a
in the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.I
Students are invited to audition1
for this production, which consists
of numerous skits and scenes
adapted from Thurber's writings.
Tryouts will be held on both days
in Room 2528 Frieze Building'
from 3-5 and from 7-9 p.m.
" Tickets for this production, asl
well as for all remaining Playbillc
Summer productions are available1
at the Mendelssohn box office
which is open daily from 12:30
p.m.

(one roentgen per hour), cell cul-
tures containing a virus.
Then the cell system and the
virus will be examined to find how
-if at all-the virus reproduction
system is affected, and whether
the virus or the cell is physically
changed.
One of the reasons for under-
taking this study is to learn more
about the "possible effects of space
travel and other exposure to ra-
diation and what influence this
may have on resistance to infec-
tious diseases," Merchant ex-
plained.
How Super-pure?
Prof. John E. Powers proposes
to use a tracing mechanism made
possible by radioactivity to find
out just how pure super-pure ma-
terials can be. Materials of excep-
tionally high purity can be pro-
duced by new methods of crystal-
lization, he pointed out, but their
actual purity so far has only been
estimated on the basis of measure-
ments of less pure substances.
He noted that it is questionable
whether this extrapolation is
valid, and will use radioactivated
substances to find out, in a process
called "activation analysis."
In this process, a superpure ma-
terial that theoretically should
not become radioactive will be ir-
radiated in the Ford Nuclear Re-
actor at the Phoenix Memorial
Laboratory and .checked for the
radioactivity that may be induced
by the reactor's neutrons. Then a
known substance that is readily
made radioactive will be mixed
into the material as an impurity.
After re-purification to the super-
pure state, the material will again
be bombarded in the reactor. A
second check for radioactivity will
provide a comparison that is ex-
pected to reveal what degree of
purity has been achieved.
Tumors and Healing
Prof. Norman Moon will study
bone tumors, metabolic diseases
of bone and healing processes
through the use of radioactive
fiourine.
The fiourine is readily taken up
by bone structure and concentrat-

PROF. DONALD MERCHANT
ed in areas of growth. It will thus
reveal, by the radiation it gives
off, the pattern of uptake and the
pattern of growth that has taken
place.
Others receiving Phoenix Prc j -
ect grants, their departments, and
their projects were:
A. Nelson Dingle, Meteorology,
"Dynamic Modeling of Rain-Pro-
ducing Systems;" Louis I. Briggs,
Geology, "Laramide (Tertiary)"
Orogenic History of the Southern
Rocky Mountains, Colorado"; Chi-
hiro Kikuchi, Nuclear Engineer-
ing, "NaF:U02** and LiF:U02**
as Neutron Detectors"; Glenn F.
Knoll, Assistant Professor of Nu-
clear Engineering, "Low Tempera-
ture Scintillation Measurements';
Harry B. Mark, Jr., Chemistry,
"Application of Coulometric Tech-
niques to Neutron Activation
Analysis and Nuclear Spectro-
scopy" Charles L. Rulfs, Chemis-
try, "The Chemistry of Tech-
netium"; George C. Summerfield,
Nuclear Engineering, "Thermal
Neutron Scattering from High
Polymers"; an dEdgar F. West-
rum, Jr., Chemistry, "Magnetic
Susceptibilities of Nuclear Ma-
terials."

A lter Ways
In Design
Traditionally based on judg-
ment, intuition, and experience,
engineering design now is being
radically affected by the everin-
creasing use of powerful comput-
ers and new mathematical tech-
niques.
These will "narrow the area of
doubt in design" and "lead to de-
signs with a minimum of guess-
work," according to Prof. Donald
L. Katz, of the engineering school.
Because the effect of the com-
puter on engineering design will
become even more widespread, he
feels engineering design teachers
must instruct their students in the
subtleties and benefits ^f the ap-
plication of computers and these
new mathematical techniques.
The National Science Founda-
tion agrees and has granted the
University $179,690 to stuCy these
effects on engineering design.
Three workshops for faculty from
the nation's engineering schools
are being planned, beginning next
summer.
At the first workshop, 20 top
engineering design professors and
practitioners will s p e n d two
months at the University to ex-
plore the latest advances ?n the
field and to work out a course of
instruction.
The following year, additional
workshops would be held to dis-
seminate the information and
course suggestions to all United
States engineering schools.
"The impact of computers on
design will be in two major areas,
"First, engineers are now, and
will be increasingly freed of tedi-
ous and repetitive computations
by relegating them to the com-
puter.
"The second, and probably the
most important area for the fu-
ture of design involves the phil-
osophy of design itself. The corn-
puter makes possible, and perhaps
even mandatory, new procedures
and methods of approach to en-
gineering design problems which
have not been experienced before."

iMaiaria For
The control of malaria has been
set back 25 years in recent months
because drugs used to fight the
disease are no longer effective
against its deadliest form.
So says a University medicinal1
chemist, who invented amodia-
quine-one of the major anti-
malarial drugs. Prof. Joseph H.
Burckhalter of the pharmacy col-
lege now heads a research team

s Defy Drugs NOW 'TILL JULY 11
America to Africa and Asia. and J0SH W HITE J1R.
particularly threatens Malaya and
Vietnam, Professor Burckhalter DOORS OPEN 8 :0
noted.
HatFIRST SHOW 9:00
Peace Corps Cover Charge
Monday-Thursday 1 .00
V i U Friday-Saturday 1.25
A Peace Corps team from 6
Washington, D. C., and overseas
is scheduled to visit the Univer-eun Voneswlbena t
sity from July 6 through 11. C ar G +
Peace Corps staff members and
returned Volunteers will be on
campus to explain the purpose COFFEE HOUSE
programs and future plans of the
Peace Corps, said a Peace Corps 114 E. Washington tat Bimbcs)
official. A Peace Corps Informa-668-9135
tion Center will be set up at a 9
central site on campus, and ftocot> n t t O nOe( ) o
manned by the Peace Corps team
throughout their visit.
The non-competitive Placement
Test will be administered several Order Your Subscription Today- -
times daily. Peace Corps Question-
naires must be completed before Phone NO 2-3241
taking the test, noted the Peace Oe
Corps official.
SHIRLEY MacLAINE and PAUL NEWMAN and ROBERT MITCHUM
r and DEAN MARTIN and GENEKELLY and BOB CUMMINGS

PROF. JOSEPH BURCKHALTER
working on the development of
two new compounds which "show
promise' for treating victims of
fatal malaria infections.
The control of malaria by medi-
cines was "well in hand until
three years ago," Prof. Burckhal-
ter said.
He noted that since then, cer-
tain deadly strains of the infec-
tious blood disease have become
"resistant" to the drugs used to
combat them up to now.
In only three years this resist-
ance has spread from South

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and DICK VAN DYKE all in.
WHAT A
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cast!
What a
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sho w!
NOW
COLOR BY DELUXE - CINEMASCOPE {(,}.

GIANT

FUN'N
ANIMAL SHOW!

All Seats, All Ages-50c

THIS WEEK'S EVENTS

TODAY
12:00 m.-The Office of Relig-
ious Affairs will present John
Koenig, Theological Intern at
University Lutheran C h a p el,
speaking on "Meanings for New
Beings: The Language of Faith
for a World Come of Age."
1:30 p.m.-The Audio-Visual
Education Center will hold a film
preview of "Dicken's Chronicle"
in the Multipurpose Rm. of the
Undergraduate Library.
7:30 pm.-The Department of
Linguistics will hold a Forum Lec-
ture with Prof. Allan R. Keiler
speaking on "Indo-European Lar-
yngeal Phonemes" in the Rack-
ham Amphitheater.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society will hold a piano re-
cital featuring Daniel Barenboim
at Rackham Aud.
WEDNESDAY
1:30 p.m.-"Shakespeare: Soul
of an Age" will be the subject of
an Audio-Visual Center Education
Film Preview in the Multipurpose
Rm. of the Undergraduate Li-
brary.

4:10 p.m.-The Summer Session
Special Program entitled "The
American Negro in Transition-
1964" will feature Bayard Rustin,
Deputy Director of the 1963 March
on Washington, speaking in Aud.
A.
8:00 p.m.-The University Play-
ers, Department of Speech Pro-
duction will present Tennessee
Williams' "Summer and Smoke"
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Stanley Quartet,
featuring Gilbert Ross, violin;
Gustave Rosseels, violin; Robert
Courte, viola; and Jerome Jelinik,
cello, will give a performance at
Rackham Lecture Hall.
THURSDAY
1:30 p.m.-The Audio Visual
Education Center will present a
film preview featuring "John Fitz-
gerald Kennedy" and "Quest for
Freedom" in the Multipurpose
Rm. of the UGLI.
4:10 p.m.-The Summer Session
Negro in Transition--1964" will
Special Program, "The American
present Prof. Hale A. Woodruff of

the education department of New
York University speaking on "The
Role of the Negro Artist in Ameri-
ca Today" in Aud B.
7:30 p.m.-The Department of
Linguistics Forum Lecture willl
feature Guy Cappelle, of the Bur-l
eau D'Etudes et de Liaison, Paris,
speaking on "Linguistic Criteria
for the Selection of Items inE
Foreign Language Teaching" att
Rackham Amphitheater.j
8:00 p.m.-The University Play-
duction will present Tennessee
ers, Department of Speech Pro-
Williams' "Summer and Smoke"
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
FRIDAY
1:30 p.m.-The Audio-Visual
Education Center Film Preview
will feature "Chicago: Midland
Metropolis" and "The Hole" in
the Multipurpose Rm. of the
UGLI.
7:00 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will present Douglas Fairbanks in
"The Mark of Zorro," Buster
Keaton in "Paleface," and Harold
Lloyd in "Never Weaken" at the
Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The University Play-
ers, Department of Speech Pro-
duction, will present Tennessee
Williams' "Summer and Smoke"
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will feature Daniel Smith, organ-
ist, in a degree recital at Hill Aud.

SATURDAY
7:00 p.m.-The Cinema Guild
will feature Douglas Fairbanks in
"The Mark of Zorro," Buster
Keaton in "The Paleface," and
Harold Lloyd in "Never Weaken"
at the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The University Play-
ers, Department of Speech Pro-
duction, will present Tennessee
Williams' "Summer and Smoke"
at the Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.

---- ALL
STATE SEATS
THEATRE ®C

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS (Department of Speech)
Tennessee Williams'
powerful drama
SUMMER and SMOKE
.a. w iracle of translating a drab corner of life into something
that is tremulous with beauty."-Brooks Atkinson, N.Y. TIMES
Opens Tomorrow
PERFORMANCES THRU SATURDAY
8:00 p.m., Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre
Box office open daily Wed. & Thurs.-$1.50, $1.00
after 12:00 p.m. Fri. & Sat.-$1.75, $1.25

I

GRAD MIXER
VFW HALL 314 EAST LIBERTY

AIR CONDITIONED
FR IDAY, JULY 10
STAG OR DRAG

9-12 P.M.

3

ONE DOLLAR DONATION-REFR
ARDEN MIESEN'SI
Sponsored by Graduate Student

2ESHMENTS
BAND
t Council

B'nai B'rith Hillel Foundation
Wednesday Special Events
TOMORROW, JULY 8, 7:30-The scheduled speaker:
DR. BORIS KOZOLCHYK, Prof. of Comparative Low
"THREE SOUTH AMERICAN JEWS:
A PORTRAIT"

1429 Hill St.

All Are Welcome

RACKHAM AUDITORIUM

["_'

k

4 - CMPS

DIAL
8-6416

PAUL NMAN
IsB-!
"Hull

II

U II

11

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