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August 08, 1964 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1964-08-08

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'Clp trtianBal
Sn'enty-Third Y or
EDTED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THEUNF.Rsm oi' M!CHTGAN
UNDER AUTHORITY OF BOARD IN CONTROL OF STUDENT PUBLICATIONS
Where Qp4?ionAm ret STUDENT PUBLICATIONS BLDG., ANN ARBOR, MIcH., PHONE NO 2-3241
Truth Will Prevail',
Editorials printed in The Michigan Daily express the individual opinions of staff writers
or the editors. This must be noted in all reprints.
[URDAY, AUGUST 8, 1964 NIGHT EDITOR: ROBERT HIPPLER

IRISH HILLS FESTIVAL
Alelanch olic

Twelfth Night'

Lewis' Resignation:
Crossroads for the OSA

IT IS ALWAYS DIFFICULT, as a retir-
ing official prepares to leave office,
to evaluate the job he has done. When
the official is an anomalous individual
such as James A. Lewis, and the position
is one as subject to emotionally volatile
issues as the student affairs vice-presi-
dency, finding an objective viewpoint
from which to. look back at the man's
incumbency is next to impossible.
What has happened since the day in
1954 when Lewis became the first vice-
president for students affairs is clear:
things have improved. The insulting and
sometimes cruel "we know what's best
for you" paternalism which then dom-
inated students-and scarred a few for
life-has gradually been dismantled,
though the transition is far from com-
plete.
Have these advances come because of
or in spite of Lewis? This must remain a
moot point. Neither his critics, many of
whom seemed to consider it logically im-
possible for Lewis to do any good, nor
Lewis himself, whose response to con-
troversy was evasive and equivocal, pro-
vide enough valid data to justify either
3udgement.
H I I' WOULD BE satisfying to
offer a definitive: brickbat o' bouquet,
for Lewis' decade in the Office of Student
Affairs, such hindsight really is second-
ary; the important thing now is the fu-
ture-and how both the past trends and
the vice-president's resignation apply to
it.
Their joint effect is to place the OSA
at a crossroads, a decision-point even
more crucial than that faced in 1962,
when the heralded "reorganization" of
the OSA took place. 1962 saw a change in
structure. 1964 will see a change in per-
sonality. And in the OSA, the effects of
personality are far more pervasive than
the effects of structure.
What, then, should the new vice-presi-
dent do?
IRST, he must continue-and accel-
erate-the transition already under-
may. There's plenty to do. Women still
are treated, in a childish manner. It re-
nains unclear just who evaluates stu-
-lents' conduct outside the classroom, by
what criteria and for whom. And while
6SA officials no longer notify parents
whose youngsters are dating someone
%f another race, the illegally-etacted
lorm fee hike and the veto clauseslipped
nto Joint Judiciary Council's new con-
st ution demonstrate that the potential
>6r the arbitrary misuse of administrative
power remains as great as ever.
These are the basically negative things
he new vice-president must do; they in-
rolve Merely a reduction of the OSA's
role in areas where this role has been
)ppressive. They require no great skill to
mplement, only decisiveness and per-
haps some courage.
BUT THESE STEPS are not enough. In
addition, the new OSA chief must
take positive steps toward improving the
*gay*
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the
ise of s1 news dispatches credited to it or otherwise
redited to the newspaer. All rights of re-publication
if ail other matters heeare also reserved.
The Daily is. a member of the Associated Press and
ollegiate Press Service.
Published daily 'luesday through Saturday morning.
ummer subsptlon rates $2 b carrier, $2.0 by mal.
Second class postage paid at Ann Arbor, Mic.

quality of extra-classroom life. The in-
fluence of a student's environment on
the student's development can never be
neutral. And as long as the University
runs dormitories, counsels students and
sets rules, the University's influence on
that environment can never be neutral.
To the extent that the University has
such influence over its students, it has
a responsibility-and an opportunity-to
use it to promote, in the words of the
1962 OSA study, "the maximum intellec-
tualgrowth of which the student is cap-
able."
iThis is a point that neither most of
the OSA nor most of its critics seem to
have understood. Others have understood
'it: the sociologists and psychologists who
advocated the residential college under-
stood it; a basic goal of the new college
is to create an environment which pro-
motes, rather than merely allows, the de-
velopment of critical and sensitive minds
-and intense and meaningful lives. For-
mer Dean of Women Deborah Bacon also
understood it; her transgression was t
use her control of the environment to
enforce propriety, conformity and obed-
ience-characteristics hostile to "mai-
mum intellectual growth."
The new vice-president, then, nfust be
willing to try to remake the University en-
vironment, and to do so without slipping
back into paternalism. Keeping this dis-
tinction- in mind, and applying it to
everything from calendaring to counsel-
ing, will be by far his most important
task-and his most difficult.
FROM THIS DESCRIPTION, albeit ab-
stract, of what the new vice-president
must do, follow several conclusions about
what he must be.
He must be dynamic and candid: able
to devise and eager to try new ideas, yet
willing to criticize even his own ideas
when they go astray. Only thus can he
both get things done and retain respect.
Again, Dean Bacon is a good example:
even her bitterest critics respected her in
.many ways, because she articulated her
beliefs honestly and lived by them.
He must be a person who understands
people-not in the usual sense of being a
nice guy or a smooth talker, but in the
sense of understanding why they behave
as they do and how they can be moti-
vated to improve themselves and their
world. Thus he will not have to stoop to
writing rules and restrictions in hopes
of improving the intellectual environ-
ment.,
He must, above all, be dedicated to the
untrammeled growth of the University
student-not just academically, but emo-
tionally, physically, intellectually, and in
every other dimension of human excel-
lence. In this regard, the idea currently
in vogue of an "academically oriented"
administrator is rather frightening; there
already are enough forces tending to
chain students to the almighty classroom.
The new vice-president must see the po-
tential role of extracurricular life, not as a
classroom-surrogate, but as a form of ex-
perience which complements but is quali-
tatively different from the academic side
of education.
THESE MAY SOUND like cloud-nine
criteria. But men with these qualifica-
tions exist-and many of them are right
here at the University.
-KENNETH WINTER
Co-Editor

EDITOR'S NOTE: The following
is the third in a series of ar-
ticles on the Irish Hills Playhouse.
George A. White is editor of Gen-
eration and the New Poet Series.
By GEORGE A. WHITE
SIMPLE IN VIEWING, complex
in analysis -Twelfth Night
represents one of Shakespeare's
most successful plays. A comedy
that moves through the tangles
of misunderstood identities and
romantic love, it defies "tinker-
ing" by directors-the play's the
thing and it must be played
straight, without invention or
elaboration.
Last Friday's productionrat Irish
Hills represented a mature play,
one that showed a harmony in
presentation, succeeding the dis-
sonance of earlier performances.
There were disappointments in
that some of the major characters,
Feste, Malvolio and 'Sir Toby
Belch, seemed less brilliant, less
sharp than before. Yet this was
more than compensated for by
good performances by Orsino,
Olivia and Maria.
The tone of Twelfth Night is
musical melancholy. The lyrical
music in song and instrument
throughout the play describes a
sick, extravagant, too-ripe world
and foreshadows its passing. The
world of Twelfth Night does not
share the violence of death as in,
say, Antony and Cleopatra; only
the splendor.
JOHN GENKE as Orsino, the
Duke of Illyria, strolls on stage
and with a flourish, commands his
lutest: "If music be the food of
love, play on./ Give me excess of
Orsino suffers from lover's mel-
ancholy; in love with the ab-
stract of ove rather than the
concrete, the Countess Olivia.
Genke successfully maintained this
strained, oft-times humorous, mel-
ancholy with elaborate gestures of
body and speech. Romantic rather
than real, Genke was a glamorous
artifact in harmony with the play.
The play is dominated in theme
by lovers and would-be lovers, but
in action on stage by four of the
strongest, most memorable charac-
ters in Shakespeare: Malvolio,
Feste, Sir Toby Belch, and Sir
Andrew Aguecheck. The mark of
a skilful director is that these
"strong" characters do not un-
balance the delicate harmonries.
AS AN Elizabethan killjoy who
would rid his Lady of "cakes and
ale," Robert Cagle was an excel-
lent Malvolio. Like the Duke, he
is full of self love. But his flaws
of character make him more than
humorous, he is sick. Elizabethans
regarded such sickness the result
of 'humours" in the body awry.
They had "cures" as well, and the
progress of the play is a state-
ment of one "method" to effect a
cure.
With his slicked, neatly-parted
hair, up-lifted nose, strut and a
host of other equally-annoying
tics, Cagle displayed more than
enough evidence of something
wrong. He was most effectiye in
combining all these to ,create a
character, mock-Puritan in nature,
that successfully alienated, as
necessary to maintain the roman-
tic veil, the audience's sympathies.
Full of a zeal to meddle and a zest
for superiority, Malvolio was bla-
tantly ridiculous and nearly im-
possible to empathize with. The
audience laughed at his plight;
they were in full agreement with
the tricks used to expose his
humor-for it was clear he was
curable, only too foolishly proud
to change.
BESIDES, the fading world of
Sir Toby and Sir Andrew (quite
possibly the dimmest wit in
Shakespeare) was made much too
dear to lose. Victor Maider-Wexler
and Eric Nord, quite simply, cap-
tured the audience.

Raider-Wexler stomped and
sputtered, glared, raged, winked,
cried; in short, used every trick
in the actor's book, to endear him-
self to his audience. And with the
skilful aid . of Nord, succeeded.
Nord, with his dull hesitations
and mock-contemplative brow,
was obscenely comic. They were
made for each other and the
audience loved it.

Perhaps the best scene with all
tlree was the garden incident
where Malvolio finds the faked
note.
The scene was staged so Raider-
Wexler, Nord, and a third, Phillip
Piro as a servant, were hiding one
behind the other watching Mal-
volio, back of the barest illusion
of a tree: a stem about an inch
in diameter, six feet tall, with
three branches. When they climb-
ed atop each other's shoulders
and Raider-Wexler on top arched
above Malvolio, the scene reached
a comic climax. Like a blustering
hawk, he sprayed his indignation

down to the audience's roars, as
Cagle regally contemplated his
future: "When I am Count Mal-
volio!"
THE CAST was shuffled some-
what, to the better I think. Brooks
Maddux played the sweetly-sly
Maria and Ann Rivers became
Olivia. Miss Maddux's overt sen-
sualness seemed much more suited
to the character of Maria. And
Ann Rivers paralleled nicely, the
abstract love of the Duke.
George Wright as Feste had a
role roughly equal to that of Mal-
volio. The fool is a special charac-

ter in Shakespeare; a character
Shakespeare is fond of. A public
entertainer, a private buffoon, he
speaks to all manner of men. In
Twelfth Night, he has the diffi-
cult task of tying the disparate
ends together.
As Feste, Wright seemed wise,
wiser than the rest of the people
in the play. A little touched, what
he said, in jest. rang of the truth:
"The more fool, madonna, to
mourn for your/brother's soul be-
ing in Heaven." His costume and
gestures were perfectly suited to
his speech; a speech that had a
quaint, yet wistfully sad tone.

Wright knew Feste we
played him with zest and
passion. It is. I think, th
role he plays at Irish Hil
* * *
TWELFTH NIGHT has
been compared to a syn
I'll have to agree and :
pairing, I choose Howard H
Second Symphony: romant
cal, one with beautiful par
are never forgotten. And
which each of the instrumr
heard clearly, for what it i
in turn with none oversha
the rest.

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR
HaahsCommentaymprol?

To the Editor:
POOR MICHAEL HARRAH! It
seems he has a bug-bear about
journalism. He refers to himself
"as a journalist." Perhaps we can
surmise from his article what his
idea of a journalist, or at least a
good journalist, really is.
He says in the opening para-
graphs of his article, "I have al-
ways considered it presumptuous
for a member of the profession to
speak in the first person . . . I
have always attempted to avoid
vocing any editorial opinion in the
first person, hoping to stick to
impersonal commentary."
This statement demonstrates
quite clearly that Harrah has a
gross misconception of the func-
tion of a public media editor or
columnist. This function is to be
anything'but impersonal and this
is why he is given a separate page
for his utterings and his pieces
are always signed. In the Ann
Arbor News the editor even speaks
under the quaint heading, "Ye
Old Editor Has His Say," and the
general editorials are headed by
the phrase, "From Our Point of
View."
THESE EDITORIAL VIEWS are
obviously personal ones. And,
equally obvious, Michael Harrah's
views are also personal, and fur-
thermore, obviously biased in fa-
vor of his personal beliefs. These
biases are perfectly evident in his
editorials. Further, I would pre-
dict that if Harrah and, for ex-
ample, Jeffrey Goodman, were to
each write a news article on the
subject of "Support Your Local
Police" stickers it would be fairly
simple to tell who wrote which
article.
This fact is probably entirely
unacceptable to Harrah's puritan-
ic, "Impersonal" soul, since he
would be the first to claim that
"editorializing" in a news article
is one of the deadly sins guaran-
teed to send a newspaperman to
the nether depths. But Harrah is
apparently unwilling to admit the
injustice of the converse - pre-
tending to give a completely "im-
personal" objective statement of
"fact" on the :editorial page in
order to express what is really his
opinion. '
His "facts," and those of others
like him, are carefully selected,
taken out of context, or else put
into just the right context, to
make the writer's point. This is
done for precisely the same reason
that John Talayco and others
make satirical remarks-to in-
fluence people to adpt the views,
of the writer or to reject views
which are incompatible with those
of the writer.
* * *
HARRAH.HAS FAILED to make
the distinction between using im-
personal facts and using facts im-
personally. But here is a member
of the "using facts personally"
school who claims that because he
uses "impersonal" facts to in-
fluence people he is more justi-
fied, more correct in some mys-
terious way, than the writer who
uses satire, sharp humor, or barb-
ed criticism to sway the attitudes
of their audience. This is short-
sightedness, if not hypocrisy.
My taste, I must admit, is for
exactly the type of sharp, quick-
witted political analysis or social
satire employed by such people as

;James Reston, Emmet John
Hughes, Mauldin, Jules Feiffer,
and John Talayco, and in the past
by such literary geniuses as Jona-
than Swift, Alexander Pope and
George Bernard Shaw. I become
rather bored with the puling, self-
righteous, insipid whimperings of
pseudo-journalists like Michael
Harrah (who despises name call-
ing). However, this is simply a
matter of taste-a matter of. my
own personal opinion.
-Peter Wolff, Grad
Persiflage
To the Editor:
WITH REGARD to Mr. Harrah's
article of August 7 re. Wil-
helm and Talayco, perhaps a prod-
igal prose" palaestra may appear"
less prolix if purveyed with a little
playful persiflage. Pursuant to his
plea for impersonal criticism, per-
sons in public eye might well pro-
fess prolepsis and personify the
pachyderm's pelt.
-Suzanne Seger
Dept. of Environmental
Health
COFO Donations
To the Editor:
N THE PROCESS of arguing
with Martha MacNeal in these
columns on whether the Council
of Federated Organizations wants
its workers killed or alive, Miriam
Dann has thrown some stones at
the people of Ann Arbor for not
contributing to her own appeal for
aid on behalf of COFO.
As coordinator for the bail fund
drive for the six Ann Arbor volun-
teers now in Mississippi, permit
me to give some facts and com-
ments.
S* * *
THE PEOPLE of Ann Arbor
have had a number of opportun-
ities to make contributions of
various kinds and in variousways
to the work of COFO in Missis-
sippi:
1) There has been the bail fund,
of which the Rev. J. Edgar Ed-
wards of Guild House is treasurer.
The conditions of the use and
care of funds contributed to the
bail fund were clearly outlined,
and a responsible group (the Ann
Arbor Friends Meeting) undertook
to coordinate the appeal. The re-
sponse has been most generous-
in fact, the goal of $3000 has
been oversubscribed. Individuals,
as well as groups such as labor
unions, religious groups, and other
civic organizations madethis pos-
sible. Of the amount in the bail-
fund, a sizeable portion is in out-
right gifts, which. if not used for
bail is to be donated without
strings to COFO on October 1.-
midsummer to hear the Freedom
Singers perform and tell of their
own experiences in Mississippi.
Contributions were taken on that
occasion for immediate use by
COFO.
3) Everyone on the list of the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People re-
ceived thatvorganization's national
appeal for voter-registration funds
for use in the South.
4) The Civil Rights Coordinat-
ing Council circulated a petition
asking President Johnson to use
available federal jurisdictional
powers to protect the lives of
COFO workers. In ten days, over
two hundred signatures were ob-
tained and forwarded to the Presi-
dent.
5) In July, our committee, with
the generous help of a group of
high school students, packed and
shipped 43 cartons :containing
over 1000 textbooks, weighing
three quarters of a ton, to the
Freedom Schools in Mississippi.
This is an incomplete list. It
does not include the constant work
of Rev. Paul Dotson, who earlier

Poor
'Patsy'

this summer was in Mississippi,
and many others of whose work I
have no direct knowledge.
I have followed Miss Dann's
appeals in the letters columns of
the local newspapers. I find her
first-hand reports from Joseph'
Harrison in Mississippi very mov-
ing, and I hope she continues to

give us these. I also have
quarrel with her right to
people for money and other
port. However, I strongly
that before she makes bl
accusations of indifference,
should inform herself some
more completely.

"0. K.-- Let's Renegotiate"

&

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14- MAT)W
MW4ERE
ON cos

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TOD.AY AND TOMORROW
U.S. Naval Power
Invincible in S.E. As

By WALTER LIPPMANN
IT IS NOT YET CLEAR why the
Hanoi government 'decided to
attack the Seventh Fleet. But the
encounter is a reminder that the
United States is present in the
seas around and in the air over
Southeast Asia.
The North Vietnamese and
Chinese infantry can do nothing
against this invincible and well-
nigh invulnerable military pres-
ence. What, is' more, nothing that
happens on the ground on the
Asian mainland can alter the fact
that the United States cannot be
driven out of Southeast Asia.
The lasting significance of the
episode is thedemonstration that
the* United States can remain In
Southeast Asia without being on
the ground.
And so, while it may well be
true that the jungle war cannot
be won, it is also true that the
United States need not, and will
not, cease to be a great power in
Southern Asia. Moreover, as long
as we excerise our enormous power
with measure, with humanity and
with restraint,, as President John-
son is intending to use it, the
risks of a wider war are limited.
* * *
THE MORE FIRMLY the fact
is established that our presence
in Southeast Asia is primarily as
a sea-and-air power, the safer it
will be to enter the negotiations
which is the only alternative to
an endless and indecisive war in
the jungle.
It is necessary to prove to the
Chinese, who probably do not
really understand sea power be-
cause they have none, that the
elephant cannot drive the whale
out of the ocean..This is an es-
sential preliminary to a good ne-.
gotiation. The Chinese will have to
accept our permanent presence asp
a great power in the South Pa-
cific.
It will be necessary, also, to
convince many Americans that the
United States would not enter
such negotiations as a defeated

gage the American Army on
mainland of Asia. Our strength
in sea power. We have depa
from the old doctrine, perhl
because we had to. But the r
line of American policy should
to return to it. For it is based
a truenunderstanding of our p
tion on this globe.
(c) 1964,The Washington Post Co
SIMULACRA
'rue Love
Wins Out
At the Michigan Theatre
OH THE COLORS are pre
and if you like the ge:
Connie Francis is a good popu
singer, but "Looking for Love"
a misanthrope's impression of
human race.
It is supposed to be a comi
but there are no funny scenes,
few attempts, all of which
standard plot twists used trite
Generally, the idea is that th
two girls think they are in 1
with the same guy, who is-
Great American Caricature-r
ning away from marriage
dallying with sex. There is a s
ond guy, who loves one of
girls, but' she doesn't think
loves him.
Of course, she really does,
the other guy settles down w
the other girl, and "True I.
wins in the end."
NOW, I can't believe that n
are both blind and dumb,
works like this keep bothering
There isn't a human being on
screen (Connie Francis is
closest, but she is given an
possible character to play). A
the simulacra either cannot
what is happening around them,
cannot reason from it, nor
they speak what they mean,

FEIFFER

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