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March 05, 1969 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-05

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Page Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Wednesday, March 5, 1969

Page Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY Wednesday, March 5, 1969

cinema
The very model of the modern major film maker

.

POT SHOP
SEMI-ANNUAL SALE
25 OFF
ON ALL HANDMADE Ceramics;
Stoneware, Mugs, Plates, Bowls,
Teapots, Vases, etc., etc.
"Come SEE and SAVE"
Sunday, March 2-Morch 10
619 Packard 9-5, 7-1 1

Some people make movies for
profit. Your parents make them
for fun. But when you put the
two together you get the new
low-budget-commercial-under-
ground-adult film, like Greet-
ings.
Greetings, a $40,000 film
about draft dodgers in New
York City has been drawing
audiences in that city for 15
weeks. Scheduled to hit Ann
Arbor this week, Greetings will
probably clean up at the Fifth
Forum.
Lucky Charlie Hirsch, who di-
rected the film considers h i s
success seriously. "We pulled
it off," he says. In Hirsch's
mind "honesty, as in Greetings
just doesn't exist. People are no
longer accepting pictures made
for 13-year-old truck drivers."
A N.Y.U. dropout, Hirsch feels

low-budget underground s t y I e
films, if well made, can be
commercially successful. "Even
commercial moves are better
now because they've had three
or four years to get 'hip' ".
"A major company can't just
make a movie for $25 million
dollars with Burton and Taylor
and expect it will be good,"
Hirsch says. At the same time,
he feels cheaper films can gross
more, if well done.
At least the New York Times
saw fit to pan the film on a
first viewing. But Stanley Kauf-
man and Pauline Kael, veteran
critics for the New Republic and
New Yorker, gave the film fav-
orable reviews.
Hirsch was pleased. "After
15 weeks in New York, we will
be happy to pay back our $40,-
000 in debts and then make $5-

10,000 for DePalma (his direc-
tor) and myself."
Indeed, films like Hirsch's may
become big money makers and
box office draws. Not only are
they easy and cheap to make,
but they are easy to sell: Stu-
dents here have already begun
sporting the promotional "Un-
cle Sam" Greetings buttons
passed out by the Fifth Forum.
Technically, Hirsch employs
the appealing visual tricks as-
sociated with underground
films. Quick cuts and flash-
backs, some scenes speeded,
others slowed and interspersed
titles. Above all, the lack of any
inhibitions in dealing with
such matters as sex, the draft,
Vietnam and the Kennedy as-
sassination are rarely seen in
films from major film com-
panies.

Because of budgetary limita-
tion, Hirsch and Palma were
forced to rely mainly on inno-
vation. The realism of the dia-
logue can be attributed to the
fact that there wasn't any script
- only a 30 page plot outline.
As DePalma and Hirsch p u t
their cameras on the actors,
whatever they said was taped
and edited into the film.
Actually, Hirsch says this was
more controlled than it appears.
"We didn't look for actors to
play certain characters, we just
look for certain characters to
be in a move."
And to keep production costs
down, the actors were not paid.
"People are dying to be in films
-whether they get paid or not
doesn't kill their interest,"
Hirsch says.
Although Hirsch prides him-
self on the artistic and cultural
merits of the film, he does not
accept it for those values alone.
Rather, his eye is set on captur-
ing the potentially lucrative
college market.,
"If you had the funds to line
up two or three good honest
movies, movies college students
would like, you could make a
fortune. Look at The Graduate
-that movie saved Joe Levine,"
he says.
So while the money and the
favorable reviews keep rolling
in, Hirsch and DePalma are
working on two new movies in

EXCLUSIVE SHOWING-NOW!
NOMINATED FOR
' I ACADEMY
AWARDS!

records
Itching for a new ;disc?

*1

'Greetings': Report for service immediately

By R. A. PERRY
An empty purse," wrote
Henry Fielding optimistically,
"causes a full heart," and for
many this could be no more true
than when the purse has been
emptied to purchase music. To
those who with painful pleasure
deplete their pockets in the itch
for the disc, the following brief
opinions may prove helpful.
Westminster Records, holding
a catalog rife with, rare treas-
ures (e. g. Hugues Cuenod re-
citals), has released two record-
ings that feature top-rated op-
era singers. On WST-17148,
Barry Morell presents familiar
arias from Verdi, Cilea, Puccini,
and Meyerbeer in a strong and
well-focused voice. Unfortunate-
1y, Morell, a top tenor at the
Met, does not do anything in-
teresting with t h a t somewhat
unflexible voice and his singing
lacks compelling conviction and
urgency. His recital is not dis-
pleasing, just innocuous.
On WST-17143, Westminster
presents the debut recital disc
of the soprano in today's New
York spotlight: Beverly Sills.
Sills' colouratura voice has been
compared to Galli-Curci, a n d
this recital of Bellini and Doni-
zetti (who else?) proves t h a t
Miss Sills does indeed possess
all of t h e colouratura equip-
ment: tight trills, precise upper
register decoration, sustained
climaxes (without the superhu-
man oscillator sound of Mado
Robin)*, a nd a strong middle
register. (I. suspect tape splicing
at one spot in the "Ancor non
giurise.") Yet, perhaps with Sills
one hears training and accom-
plishment, while with Galli-
Curci one feels an uncanny nat-
ural marksmanship; a moot
point to be surehAll that this
important Westminster d i s c
lacks is variety and cleaner sur-
faces.
Columbia has squeezed all of
Dvorak's ebullient S51 a v o n i c
Dances onto one disc (MS 7208)
with lithe, precise, and mildly
jolly readings by Szell and the
Cleveland Orchestra. It is a
good buy, well recorded, but I
shall continue to cherish t h e
really idiomatic renditions by=
Talich and the Czech Philhar-
monic on Artia.

Any lover of brass music
should not miss Columbia's new
recording (MS 7209) that fea-
tures the brass ensembles of the
Cleveland, Chicago, and Phila-
delphia Orchestras in the anti-
phonal "canzoni per sonare" of
Gabrieli. So replete with design,
tempo, and texture changes,
these pieces' demand superior
stereo recordings to fully cap-
ture all the effects. Columbia
manages masterfully; let it suf-
fice to say that in an "echo can-
zon" you can really hear three
distinctly placed ensembles.
Nonesuch, that company which
has revolutionized the record in-
dustry in so many ways (price,
format, repertoire), continues
their "Master Works for Organ"
series with a collection of 17th
century works from the Nether-
lands (H71214). Included is a
Fantasia by the important and
a1w a y s satisfying composer
(poorly represented in SchwannY
Jan Sweelinck, a moving Psalm
by Speuy, a piece by the English
expatriot John Bull, and works
by more esoteric composers. Jor-
gen Ernst Hansen provides sen-
sitive readings and the None-
such engineers supply clear and
rich sound.
For those for whom the name
Ralph Vaughan Williams con-
jures up pastoral or nocturnal
Bargrain prices
For Moscow
State Concert
A special concert of the Mos-
cow State Symphony will be
presented Wednesday evening,
March 12th. The virtuosic young
pianist Nikolai Petrov will play
the Prokofieff Concerto No. 3.
Variations on a Roccoco Theme
shall feature cello soloist Feor-
dor Luzanov. The Shostakovich
Fifth :Symphony shall be con-
ducted by the composer's son,
Maxim Shostakovitch.
For this special attraction all
balcony seats will be priced at
$1.00 and $2.00. Thursday eve-
ning's performance of the Mos-
cow State Symphony is sold out.

moods a la "Greensleeves," a
h e a r i n g of the composer's
Fourth Symphony should prove
corrective. Written in the early
'Thirties, this work w a s then
considered exceedingly violent
and course; today less perjora-
tive words such as "powerful"
or "vigorous" might be more ap-
plicable. The symphony is very
well-written; by that I simply'
mean that eschewing much of
the activity of similar works-
such as Elgar's Second Sym-
phony - which consists of bus-
tle without clear intent, Vau-
g h a n Williams convincingly
trims excess and lucidly directs
the progression of music a n d
emotion.
Sir Adrian Boult's-new record-
ing (Angel S-36557) of this score
captures all of the controlled
barbarism of the music; Boult
reveals endless details without
in any way vitiating the thrust
of the larger structural move-
ments. Futhermore (can you
take another panegyric?) Angel
has provided the clearest, clean-
est, most dynamicalls wide yet
undistorted sound I have ever
heard from that company;
For those who still prefer the
"Greensleeves" genre, the idyllic
"Norfolk Rhapsody," an early
Vaughan Williams work, has
been added as a "filler."

the quest for another commer-
cially successful but artistically
"honest" movie.
Their next, being financed by
Filmway distributors is an at-
tack on the easily satirized "si-
lent middle class that elected
Nixon." This, Hirsch says, will
be a little larger than Greet-
ings, "but still sort of cheap."
-L.W.

STEAK and EGGS
with hashbrown potatoes,
toast and jelly
$1.10
STEVE'S LUNCH
just west of SAB
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS, TOO
~~.~

I 4
PrduesJOHN WOOLF wCAR by E
Tickets at Box- Office or By Mail!
Also at Sears, Hudson's Major Stores, Marwill Book Stores
BOX OFFICES OPEN 1:00 - 9:00 P.M. Wed., Sat., Sun
Other'Days 4:00-9:00

f
i

__ _

-.. ..
1

NATIONAL OENERAL CORPORATION
H EL D OVER FOX EASTERN THEATRESS
4TH WEEK FOX VILIBSE
375 No. MAPLE RD.-"769.1300

The Theatre
Will Be Emptied
After 7:00 P.M.
Showing Fri.-Sat.

Nominated for 2 Academy Awards
BEST Picture * BEST Director *
T

PARAMOUNT PICTURES panea e
4 WtE tI{.V
The
FACO ZEFFIRELLI
ROMEO
{ ULIET

Al RPORT
LIMOUSINES
for information call
971-3700
Tickets are available
at Travel Bureaus or
the Michigan Union
32 Tri slDv

MATINEES.
Wednesdays, 2:
Saturdays A Hi
Sundays, 2:040

SCHEDULE OF PERFORMANCES AND PRICES:
EVENINGS:
:00 PM (except March 5) $2.00 Monday thru Thursdi
lidays, 2:00 PM......2.50 Fri.,. Sat. & Holidays,
PM ............... 3.00 Sundays .00OPM....

ay, 8.00 PM. $2.50
8:00PM.. 3.00
.........3.00

4"
0)

Showings
Daily
1:30
4:00
7:00
9:35

Forth.at.pestiesand groups; phone ANN SQUIRES, 963-1251
and LO MFIELD
i 44E UPtE lfEIU$S f in BIRMINGHAM on WOODWARD
IST N ! 1670 / 2 Ikis S. .N ISMi. MI 4.60

HIS

WE

K1

is the last week of voter registration
for the April City Election
REGISTER- City Hall (2nd floor)
Huron and Fifth
Mon.-Fri. 8 A.M.-8 P.M.

r< ps vay
TVl RETAS
No Deposit FREE service
per month.Required
NEJAC TV RENTALS 662-5671
SERVING BIG 10 SCHOOLS SINCE 196
Special Added Concert
MOSCOW STATE SYMPHONY
MAXIM SHOSTAKOVICH, Conducting
Soloists: NIKOLAI PETROV, Pianist
FEODOR LUZANDV, Cellist
lI HILL AUDITORIUM

*
4

ENDING TONIGHT 1

j

'1
,
E

WNNER OF 6 ACADEMY
AWARDS including
BEST PICTURE OF THE YEAR!
COLUMBIA PICTURES preents
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
FILM OF
A MAN
FuR ALL u
SEASONS S
From the I gAY by .
"Today showing at 9 p m. only

ff you have been refused registration, try again

(and again)

,

* UNCLASSIFIED*
"LUSTY, GUSTY, COMEDY!"
-Washington Evening Star
."
1399n ',-ms~
vK4T ETom,. is
DoKE I OnRE
Today shown at 7 p.m. only

this week. Many students are successful on their second try.
SGC VOTER REGISTRATION-662-7394

go

MN

1111

a..., t

-THURSDAY

p

2 ACADEMY AWARD
"RACHEL, RACHEL"
Best Picture * Best Actress
Joanne Woodward
Best Supporting Actress
Estelle Parsens
Best Screenplay from a Book

NOMINATED FEATURES
"HEART IS A
LONELY HUNTER"
Best Actor
Alan Arkin
Best Supporting Actress
Sandra Locke

em

mm:

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

BENEFIT FOR DIONYSUS '69
Theatre of Cruelty
Presents
The Final Performance of
"PADUMA"
A BURMESE EPIC OF APOCALYPSE
A Cast of Thirty-Five Crazed (but talented) Actors
Featuring JON KAISER and EMILY WATTS
With the voice of Roger Maneld and the GAMELAN

Wednesday, March 12, 8:30
PROGRAM:

Overture to "Russlan and Ludmilla"........... ....
Variations on a Rococo Theme for Cello and Orchestra, Op. 33
Feodor Luzanov
Concerto No. 3 in C major, OpI 26.....................
Nikolai Petrov
Symphony No. 5, Op. 47 .............. .. .........

Shostakovich

..... . G. : Glinka
.Tchaikovsky,
Prokoficef

E

11111 *

*1

4

iI

I

HELD OVER!
SHOWS AT:
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05 Info: 662-6264
Student 198200624 Was Officially
Designated Missing.. .
DITV DANfD

9

M ,iZ ,m ql Act--A-nxr t" f J"11'J I JI J'f!'l it

Mania; Petrov. bianist

1111

I j mtaim1 1311taxohviI..L, (.(IILIL i .'?i '~iX~t14a. z'."VV JM1*

Hill

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