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March 02, 1969 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1969-03-02

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Two

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sunday, March 2, 1969

Two THE MICHIGAN DALY Sunday, March 2, 1969

___ __ _-music
48 hours of hot dogs and rock

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

4

By THOMAS R. COPI,
JOHN GRAY,
FRED LaBOUkI
And a Cast of Thousands
Thirty-six hours, 650 songs,
four dozen hot dogs, a case of
orange juice and 34 beers ago
we sat down in front of a radio,
two tape recorders, 18,000 feet
of tape, a deck of cards and a
sheaf of paper to hear the His-
tory of Rock and Roll.
Right now our minds have
turned to jelly, we're hung over,

broke, hungry, sick of hot dogs,
running out of tape and pretty
damn happy.
We've been spelling each
other. As one of us passes out
or has to write the others man
the recorders. And then whoever
missed it listens to the tape and
the live show at the same time.
Through earphones. Steve Stills
in one ear and LaVerne Baker in
the other. Whoooeeeee.
We were skeptical I'll admit,
as the strains of "Judy in Dis-
guise" faded out at 11:59 a.m.
Friday. It seemed likely that we
were going to hear a hoked-up
version of the regular old Mil-
lion Dollar Weekend that Top 40
radio stations love so much.
But from the very beginning
CKLW hit a high note of integ-
rity and good taste that's hard
to believe.
It's been a fantasy trip, a
recapitulation of all the things
that have happened in our lives.
All of a sudden you're thirteen
and your girl smells like hair.
spray and Clearasil, and then
you're seven listening to your
big sister's radio, and then it's
last year. After twenty hours or
so it starts to drive you crazy.
Songs,. songs, eight hundred
songs. Songs that you had total-
ly forgotten but that now take
you back to summer - camp;
songs that you never even knew
existed but that you can sing
along with anyway because
they're just like all the rest.
CKLW's Rockumentary is the
brainchild of Pete Johnson,
music critic for the Los Angeles
times. It isn't what you might
think; that is, it doesn't start
with Rosemary Clooney and run
through year by year until final-
ly, inevitably we get to "Dizzy,"
today's number one tune.,I
Instead the 100 or so guys
who put together "radio's fin-
est hours" organized it into

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 358 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p. m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi:-
mum or two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
SUNDAY, MARCH 21

Patricia Berger Porcello, English De- Auditorium D, Angell Hall, 4:10 p.m.
partment, "The Use of the Railroad in
American Literature; Poetry, Folk-Song, University Lecture: Professor Aldo
and the Novel": West Conference Scaglione, of the University of North
Room, Rackham, 8:00 p.m. Carolina, will give an illustrated lec-
ture on "Literary and Architectural
Analogies in the Language of the Bero-
G ener al Notices que", on Tuesday, March 4, at 8 p.m.,
in the West Conference Room of the

Dy

Calendar

-Daily--Thomas R. Copi

Bureau of Industrial Relation Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 83": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
Degree Recital: Gwen Scheffel, so-
prano: School of Music Recital Hall,
4:30 p.m.
University Concert and Varsity Bands:
George Cavender, George Cavanagh,
conductors: Hill auditorium, 3:30 p.m.
Cinema Guild: Jeanne Moreau in
The Lovers: Architecture Auditorium,
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Degree Recital: Nancy Seabold, so-
prano: School of Music Recital Hall,
8:30 p.m.
MONDAY EVENTS
Fire Chief's Training Conference: Re-
gistration: Michigan Union Lobby, 8:00
fa.m.
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers, Pro-
gram No. 83": North Campus Commons,
8:15 a.m.
School of Public Health Lecture: Dr.
George Pickett, Health Director, City
of Detroit and County of Wayne "The
Cynics versus the Romantics in Ur-
ban Health": School of Public Health
Auditorium, 4:00 p.m.
School of Education Lecture: Dr.
Gerald Weinstein, University of Massa-
chusetts at Amhurst, "The Disadvant-
aged: Challenge to Education": Shorl-
ing Auditorium, University High School,
4:00 p.m.
Engineering Seminar: Professor Stuart
Schwartz, Dept. of Electrical Engineer-
ing, Princeton University, "Analysis of
a Decision-Directed Receiver with Un-
known Priors", Room 1504 E. Engineer-
ing, 4:00 p.m. se
Women' Research Club Meeting: Dr.

Broadcasting Service: WUOM R a d i o
(91.7 Me.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily:
Saturday 12 Noon to 11 p.m.; Sunday
12 Noon to 6 p.m.
Sunday 1:00 pm. Directions in Child-
ren's Literature - Herbert Kohl readsj
from his book 36 Children. Sunday 2:00
p.m. Cleveland Orchestra Concert,
George Szell conductor. Prokofiev, Hay-
dn, Mozart.
Monday 11:00 p.m. The Eleventh Hour
(repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows hostsr
an hour of news and conversationj
about the arts and literature. Guests:
Music duo Keith Bryan and Karen
Keys. 4
Monday 1:00 p.m. UAC Lecture: Hon.
Strom Thurmond, R., South Carolina,
speaking at the U-M in mid-January
1969. Monday 5:00 p.m. Calendar of
Area Events. Monday 5:15 p.m. Law
in The News, with Prof. Joseph R.
Julin. Monday 10:30 p.m. RX For
Health, produced by Dr. William Led-
ger of the Medical Center.
Center for Russian and E. European
Studies: Alexander Ivasluc, Romanian
Writer and Visitinng Writer, Writer's
Workshop, State University of I o w a
"Romanian Literature in the Light of
Social and Political Developments of
the Last 25 Years", Tuesday, March 4,'
Program Information 6-668-6416
TODAY--2 SPECIALS
Winner of 6 Academy Awards
COLUMBIA PICTURES pmenle
FRED ZINNEMANN'S
FIL OF
AMDAN
FORALL
SE ASONS
From the p ay by
)RUBET , ()LTE 'ChW y

Rackham Building. The lecture is spon-
sored by the Department of Romance
Languages.

May 1969 Teacher's Certificate Candi-
dates: All of the requirements for t h a
teacher's certificate must be complet-
ed by March 17. These requirements
include the teacher's oath and the
material for the, Placement Office. The
oath should be taken as soon as pos-
sible in Room 2000 University School.
The office is open from 8-12 and 1-5,
Monday through Friday.
Free German Measles Vaccine, Mon-
day, March 3 and Tuesday, March 4,
(Continued on Page 10)
Program Information6665-6290
TODAY-Shows at 1 -00-
3:00-5:00-7:05-9:10 P.M.

*1

segments like "The History of
Rhythm and Blues," "The His-
tory of Country and Western
in Rock and Roll," "Folk Spot-
light," etc. As we go to press
we have jived through two
twelve - hour - long "C h a r t
Sweeps" which chronologically
presented the best of the Top
Forty from 1953 to today.
Interspersed between songs,
God so many songs, are inter-
views with the singers, produc-
ers, and composers responsible
for rock. Phil Spector talks
about Sonny Bono, Nino Tempo
and Billy Strange on "Zip-a-
Dee-Doo-Dah." Little Richard
Penniman recalls his conversion
to the way of the Lord, and

Ahmet Ertagun explains the
unique guitar styling on an
early release by noting that "the
bass player didn't show up." It's
the kind of trivia that sends
rock fiends into near hysteria,
that's if they can stop dancing
long enough to pay close atten-
tion.
the narration by Charlie Van
Dyke which runs all through the
show is much much better than
we had expected. Instead of the
Life Magazine kind of conven-
tional wisdom most of us asso-
ciate with big radio rock 'n' roll,
his comments are mostly valid,
sometimes damn funny (he re-
fers in one song to "metaphy-
sical poetry at its most gro-
tesque") and once in awhile even
perceptive.
The creators of the show have
apparently realized the impor-
tance of letting the music speak
for itself to their everlasting
credit and our everlasting joy.
And their programming has
been impeccable. No sooner does
one of us remember some song
they forgot, when they play it.

However, we can hardly forgive
their repetition of four songs out
of 650. They can't fool us.
We were afraid at the begin-
ning that we were going to have
a fist fight on our hands. The
show opened with five hours of
R&B to the dismay of those of
us who have been claiming for
years that C&W is being sadly
underrated in the conventional
wisdom of rock history. But
CKLW came back and gave
white roots their due, no more
no less. The balance has been
beautiful.-
Today at noon it will all be
over. Twelve more hours. If only
they can keep it up, if only the
balance stays balanced it will
have all been worth it and more.

nI

3-" m

Yelo S umap~I iM
I g I

He's the King

Go hear the Good News

By BOB FRANKE
Dave Van Ronk maintains
that before 1968 he only said of
two people in the music busi-
ness that they would make it:
Bob Dylan in 1961 and Joni
Mitchell in 1965. He says the
same about two young men
from Philadelphia who call
themselves Good News. After
hearing themon Friday night I
can see his reasons.
I was screaming about Joni
Mitchell myself in '67 and '68
because although it was evident
that she stood beside and apart;

from Dylan and above the rest
of popular music, I could see
her, given the rather (pardon
the expression) soulless state of
the business, being relegated to
a small audience at this time
and a great many master's
theses a hundred years from
now.
I am not worried about Good
News, however. Tonight at
Canterbury is your last chance
to see them for the price; it's
entirely up to you. They will be
heard. If the MC5 are the logi-
cal end of rock music, Good

News is simply the beginning of
a new phase in popular music.
Their elements are gpitar,
bass, cello, two precisely close
voices, a collection of simple,
clear very deep and very beauti-
ful songs, a sense of humor and
good times and absolutely no
crap whatsoever.
Descriptive metaphors: vocal-
ly, a little like the Bee Gees
talking sense for a change. The
power of Dylan without the ob-
scurity. The lyric precision of
J o n i Mitchell without the
drama. Musically like a Flemish
master painting representation-
ally with a restricted pallette.
Friday night they achieved
immediately the spontaneity
that Kweskin was looking for
when he came here and smoth-
ered in his own self-conscious-
ness. Simply everybody digging
it and having a good time. No
trouble at all, no tension.
It has been coming for a long
time; I remember Joni at Mari-
posa last year talking about
music coming back from the
dance hall into the living room,
and filling it out. There is so
much there, folks, that it just
doesn't need to be hyped. Good
news, indeed.
STEAK and EGS
with hashbrown potatoes,
toast and jelly
$1.10
STEVE'S LUNCH
lust west of SAB
NOW OPEN SUNDAYS, TOO

Saturday and Sunday
THE LOVERS
(LES AMANTS)
Directed by Louis Malle, 1959
JEANNE MOREAU
"The film's unrestrained ro-
mantic plunge into the Real-
ity of Sex is purely youthful."
-Stanley Kauffman
Short: THE CAGE
(San Quentin prisoners)

3020 Washtenaw, Ph. 434-1782
Between Ypsilanti & Ann Arbor
NOW SHOWING
Feature
Wed., Sat., Sun
1:30-3:45-6:15-8:30
Mon., Tues., Thurs., Fri.
6:30-9:00
JOIN-IN THE DISNEY
FUN-IN! ..
A. ~ Q

I

I

I

I

I

1i

I

4

75c

7:00 & 9:05
662-8871

ARCH ITECTURE
AUDITORIUM

..sc .as:s' CS ' as:'C520CO 9e. "0"v '* 0 <
WALT DISNEY
Win nieth bohJ
and the blustery dw
Technicolor"

He's the Genius

CINEMA II
PETITIONING FOR
BOARD MEMBERS
SIGN UP NOW
on
SGC bulletin board,
first floor SAB

G UILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
Mon., March 3-Noon Luncheon 25c
PROF. DONALD MICHAEL, Psychology Dept.:
"THE UNPREPARED SOCIETY"
Tues., March 4-Noon Luncheon

t
t
t

it

I

DEAN WILLIAM HAYS:
"ACADEMIC REFORM AT
THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN"

,',,

I

ENDS TODAY
"BY FAR THE BEST"
-.Y. Times
3:00, 5:00, 9:00

Um,,,..cCmPMdtbyPSMO,84ft p,t~ura. }"

I

S1.M0 TdMISWt£' "TClUGOQR* dA MWWAT PJUll

THEY'RE
IN THE
ATTIC
e FORA
WEEK!

SNEAK PREVIEW
TONIGHT AT 7:05 YOU CAN SEE A NEW FILM IN
COLOR AND PANAVISION-RATED "R"--A MA-
JOR LITERARY PUBLICATION SAYS THIS MOVIE
IS "ONE OF THE YEAR'S 10 BEST"

"Stoned
Animation Trip"
lasting nearly three hours
An International Collection of
AWARD WINNING
experimental animated cinema
including examples of BRITISH, CZECHOSLOVAK-
IAN (spoof on American films), CANADIAN (Nor-
man McLaren's "Mosaic" and "Blinkity Blank"),

4

-Daily-Richard Lee

0

- - -

CONTEMPORARY THEOLOGY
BOOK REVIEW AND DISCUSSION SERIES
GUILD HOUSE invites you to a series of ecumenical
discussions of current books in Theology.
MARCH 6 A Rumor of Angels by Peter Berger
Reviewed by Rev. Donald Postema (Campus Chapel)
MARCH 13 Theology of Hope by Jurgen Moltmann
Reviewed by Rev. Donald Zill (Lutheran Student Chapel)

W-

I

F r"4

FZFTN AVE

DOUBLE FEATURE-MON., TUES., WED. ONLY
"BENJAMIN"-7:15 "LADY"-9:00

I

INDIAN and AMERICAN Cinematic Art

Bartlett's spectacular "off-on")
PLUS Mickey Mouse in Viet Nam, Betty Boop, Koko,
Bimbo, Mr. Magoo, and Gene Autry, The Sounds of

(Scott

4,

ornd thina 1

"BENJAMIN" is
rated X-no one
under 16 admitted

ACADEMY AWARD
WINNER
ROD STEIGER in

the Beatles, Cab Colloway, Ella Fitzgerald,

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