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January 11, 1969 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-11

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, lanuary.1 l,'19691'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Page .Three

January 11, 196~ THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Paae Three

WITHER HIGHER EDUCATION?

An

old

solution

for

an

older

problem

By SUSIE SCHMIDT
WASHINGTON (CPS).-Sug-
gesting that the federal gov-
ernment take a more active part
in the financing of higher ed-
ucation in America has been a
popular pastime lately.
So has championing the right
of every able student to an ed-
ucation, regardless of his abili-
ty to pay.
Those were the dual notes
sounded again shortly . before
Christmas by the Carnegie Com-
mission on Higher Education, in
a report called "New Levels of
Federal Responsibility."
Clark Kerr, former president
of the University of California
at Berkeley and now chairman
of the Carnegie Foundation-
funded Commission, explains
his proposals in terms of "quali-
ty and quantity" for higher ed-
igation in the 1970's.
By 1976-77, he says, the fed-
eral government will have to
be bearing one-third of' higher
education's total cost in this
country (estimated at $13 bil-
lion) as opposed to the one-
fifth it now carries. If it does
not assume this responsibility,
the Commission says; the quali-
ty of the nation's already
pinching universities will de-
cline almost beyond retrieval;
and they wil become unable to
open their doors to students who
cannot pay exorbitant tuition
fees.

The Commission's 56-page,
report contains a total of 22
recomendations (all handily
writen in language easily adapt-
able to legislation and with
price tags already attached)
for federal aid to higher educa-
tion. The recommendations
would channel funds to students
themselves (enabling them to
choose their own institutions),
and to the schools for facilities
and salaries.
In addition, the report urges
establishment of two new fed-
eral agencies concerned with
higher education: a foundation
(like the/ National Science
Foundation) to work for devel-
opment of new techniques in
education, and a council on ed-
ucation to work directly under
- the White House.
The rationale for such ex-
tensive federal participation, of
course, is the same theory of
education that Kerr introduced
anialysis
in 1963 and which so endeared
him to liberal intellectuals and
so enraged students: The uni-
versity is a place where young
people are taught the trades
they will need to fit into gov-
ernment, business, and the other
roles modern society wants
them to fill. A logical extension
is that, since universities are
filling the society's manpower
needs (not to mention doing its
war research), the government
has an obligation to finance
university programs.
A major guiding premise of
the Commission report is that
as long as most of society is
going to regard a diploma as a
ticket to jobs and economic se-
curity, higher education must
be made available to many more
poor students. If this is not
done, the present informal elitist
system in America might as well

become an hereditary ruling
class.
Another praiseworthy point is
the recommendation that most
aid to students be in the form
of direct stipends to them, so
that they can choose their own
school and plunk down cash for
it. Such a system avoids the
pitfalls of loan programs which
handicap students to payments
for the first years after grad-
uation when they can least af-
ford it, and of giving money
only to institutions with their
wobbly admissions policies.
.But at that point the Com-
mission blinks and starts to
sound like every other good lib-
eral proposal ever made f o r
higher education. Who is to get
the government money to go to
school? Those who could not
afford college, but who are qual-
ified to attend; those who can
get high scores on College
Board exams and write the
King's English and conjugate
French verbs.
And so the much-touted re-
port begs the question: what
about those students to whom
higher education (and to a large
extent high school education)
has never adapted - those who
speak the language of the ghet-
to, who do not know how to
answer College Board questions?
The educational system knows
how to deal with these students:
it prods them along until they
are 16, trying to cram them in-
to square holes they don't un-
derstand and making them mis-
erable, and then it (conscious-
ly or unconsciously) forces them
to drop out of the schools which
are more comfortable without
them. Or it lets them finish high
school without once having used
their minds for anything but
memorizing senseless equations
and rules.
Is the educational system ever
to do anything for the students
who not only can't afford col-
lege but who don't qualify in the
conventional sense? Obviously,
if it is to attempt to solve social

problems rationally, it must. The
answer is assuredly not ignor-
ing them, as the Carnegie Com-
mission, like its predecessors,
would do.
Nor is the answer that of the
San Francisco State radicals,
who are demanding that t h e
college admit all non-white stu-
dents who apply to the school
next fall.
Taking in exactly those stu-
dents - all who apply - is, in
the end, the right answer, but
not while the colleges are or-
ganized as they are today. "Let-
ting them in" and then flunk-
ing them out because they don't
understand what is going on
there is not a solution. Before

that step can be taken, colleges
will have to develop programs to
acclimate these students to col-
lege, to train them in some
skills they do not have, but
more important, to change the
college into an institution com-
patible with American subcul-
tures and minority races, and
an institution which can take
people who didn't pass their
College Boards (as well as those
who did) and teach them to
think and reason and learn how
to use their minds to make their
lives better and deeper.
That sort of study, that sort
of program, is what the Carne-
gie Commission should be study-
ing and thinking about. But

perhaps in the long run, what-
ever it thinks about and re-
commends to the government in
1969 will not make any differ-
ence.
Perhaps asking the federal gov-
ernment in 1969 to do some-
thing for those "who are too
poor" for college, is a wasted
gesture. Perhaps after the Nix-
on victory we will really hear
the middle class telling t h em-
selves, in this year of Amer-
ica's deepest bitterness and
agony, that they are tired of
giving their hard-earned money
to the have-nots, that it's finally
time for them to take and take
and give no more.

AFTER THE THAW:

The memory lingers on

The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is at the
Student Book Service

By WILLIAM L. RYAN
AP Special Correspondent
Recently a Soviet court af-
firmed the sentence to exile or
labor camp of five intellectuals
who disagreed with the invasion
of Czechoslovakia.
The case underscored how So-
viet policy often seems to trip
over its own feet in domestic,
foreign and international affairs
and in the use of the nation's
enormous power. If policy aims
are what theyseem to be, Mos-
cow often appears to defeat its
own purpose.
The party has only a year to
prepare for what obviously will
be an elaborate celebration of
the 100th anniversary of Lenin's
birth. Signs indicate frantic
haste to repair and polish the
Soviet image by then, but
there's a lot of polishing to do
and time is short.
Is Moscow trying to erase the
memory of Stalin and give com-
munism a more attractive look?
Recent events In the orbit
0 more and more evoke the Stalin
image and create an impression
that for 12 years "de-Staliniza-
tion" has been mostly an illu-
sion.
Vladimir Ilyich 'Ulyanov, who
called himself Lenin, established
the Bolsheviks in power 51
years ago. He promised all man-
ner of freedoms, self -determina-
tion for, minorities, the "with-
ering away of the state." Since
then Russia has come far in
terms of state power, armed
might, massive industry, scien-
tific achievements.

In terms of Lenin's promises,
it has been retrogressive. What
was autocracy under the tsar is
today's "partyocracy," or total
domination by a relatively small
group.
Does the Kremlin seek to
maintain the picture of Western
"imperialism" as the greatest
threat to world peace?
The Soviet Union often looks
like the imperial Russia whence
it sprung. For the restless ex-
pansion of tsarist Russia which
enveloped one-sixth of the
earth's surface, there is today's
imperialism of "socialism."
For tsarist sway over sub-
jugated states, there is today's
sway over Communist European
states. The Kremlin claims the
right to dictate their foreign and
domestic policies just as the
tsars controlled those matters
for satellite states. -
Does Kremlin policy, as has
been evident for a long time,
seek to drive wedges into the
North' Atlantic Alliance and
break it up?
The invasion of Czechoslova-
kia and the Soviet posture to-
ward central Europe oblige
NATO to tighten its structure,
just as Stalin's policies 19 years
ago helped bring about the birth
of NATO.
Does Kremlin policy seek a
lessening of tensions, a detente,
to permit more attention to the
crisis of international commu-
nism and to internal Soviet
problems?
The recent declaration of the
Brezhnev Doctrine - claiming
the right of intervention where

6ommum

-C.

.ice -. ice. - - - - 1i. - ice. - -

p0
presents
i {
JIM KWF SKIN
Laughin' and scratchin'
TON IT E
.... 8:00P.M. free food & drink
ndAY:tables & chairs too
SUSN0DAY
ADMISSION: $2.00 at the door~ ($1.75 after 2nd set)

M
I

Moscow feels "socialism" threat-
ened-is a severe setback to any
hopes of detente. The Brezhnev
Doctrine is extended even to in-
clude the right to intervene in
West Germany at the appear-
ance there of anything seeming
to Moscow to be a "threat to
socialism."
Westerners with access to So-
viet technocrats in posts around
the world react with awe to dis-
plays of themodern Soviet bu-
reaucratic mind at work, a mind
which says it was right and
necessary to invade Czechoslo-
vakia, that the Russians have
a right, if they please, to invade
Romania and Yugoslavia be-
cause "we gave them freedom"
in World War II. The doctrine,
in a nutshell, is: "They belong
to us; we will do with them as
we please."
All this has hastened the col-
lapse of what until recently had
seemed a fairly successful cam-
paign to erode NATO.
One big difference between
imperial Rusia and the U.S.S.R.
is that the tsars lacked an in-
ternational movement to use as
an instrument of policy. Today's
Moscow has one, but few will
deny that the international
movement is in deep crisis. Im-
portant parties are acting up,
largely because of Moscow's own
policies, which tend Ito damage
prospects of Communists in the
West.
The Russians blame every-
body but themselves. Their trou-
bles are caused by American
"imperialists," by foreign spies,
saboteurs and propagandists
trying as Moscow tells it, to
wrench nations from the Mos-
cow orbit.
The invasion of Czechoslova-
kia and the Brezhnev Doctrine
delivered blows ,to Communist
world unity for which Moscow
still anxiously seeks a summit
of party leaders.
Bluntly, however, Soviet theo-
reticians announce that there
cannot ,be any such thing as
liberalization in the Communist
system. Parties seeking respect-
ability, in the educated West
cannot openly accept such
theses without risking heavy
losses, and the divisions in the
movement have deepened.

the
news toda
by~ The Associated Press and College Press Service
NEUTRAL SWEDEN extended diplomatic recognition
to North Vietnam yesterday.
Sweden thus becomes the first western nation to recog-
nize.North Vietnam.
There is increasing speculation that the next Swedish
move may be to recognize the National Liberation Front.
Relations between Sweden and South Vietnam lapsed two
years ago and have not been resumed.
Official U.S. State Department reaction was restrained.
"The U.S. government does not believe this decision will ad-
vance the cause of peace in Southeast Asia," a spokesman
said.
In Oslo, the Norwegian foreign ministry announced the
government will meet early next week to discuss the ques-
tion of recognizing North Vietnam.
SECRETARY OF HEALTH, Education and Welfare
Wilbur J. Cohen urged a 50 per cent hike in Social Secur-
ity benefits yesterday.
Cohen said that such a move would drastically cut pov-
erty in the United States. He also recommended to President
Johnson that family planning information be made avail-
able to the poor, on a voluntary basis.
Cohen called for an immediate 15 per cent across-the-
board hike to $70 a month and eventual minimum benefits
of at least $100 a month. The current minimum is $55 month-
ly.
THE U.S. DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE has filed suit
against the big four auto makers for an alleged agree-
ment in restraint of trade.
The civil anti-trust suit filed in U.S. District Court in
Los Angeles, alleges that General Motors, Ford, Chrysler, and
American Motors have agreed since 1953 to eliminate all com-
petition among themselves in the field of air-pollution con-
trol devices.
The suit further alleged that the defendants agreed to
install anti-pollution devices only at a uniform date.
BRITISH PRIME MINISTER HAROLD WILSON re-
fused yesterday to back down from his offer to compro-
mise with the rebellious government of Southern Rho-
desia.
Under pressure from Africa and Asian members of the
British Commonwealth at the Commonwealth Congress in
London, Wilson defended his proposal to Rhodesian Prime
Minister Ian Smith as "the lesser of two evils."
The proposal, which would have maintained Smith as the
head of Rhodesia, while extracting certain representational
concessions for black Rhodesians, was rejected by Smith.
The African Commonwealth members feared that any
guarantees made by Smith could easily be broken.
Wilson also rejected a proposal by Zambian President
Kenneth Kaunda for direct military intervention in Rho-
desia. Wilson agreed that Rhodesia should not be recognized
until black rule is established there.
* . .
REPUBLICAN NATIONAL CHAIRMAN Ray Bliss yes
terday was asked by Richard Nixon to remain the party
chairman.
The move put an end to speculation that Nixon would
drop Bliss from the Republican leadership position.
Nixon also named Lockheed executive James D. Hodgson
as undersecretary of labor.
Secretary of Labor-designate George P. Shultz denied
that there was any significance that no appointees Aso far
have been union representatives.
THE U.S. SENATE debated strengthening its anti-
filibuster rule yesterday.
Sen. Frank Church, D-Idaho, wants to reduce the ma-
jority needed for cloture from two-thirds to three-fifths.
Sens. Phillip A. Hart, D-Mich., and Jacob K. Javits, R-N.Y.,
are pressing for a rule that would require only 51 senators to
cut off debate.

Senate liberals have never been successful in reducing
the two-thirds majority rule, established in 1917. The at-
tempt to change the rule this year could be thwarted by a fili-
buster.
THE SOVIET UNION launched an unmanned probe
to Venus yesterday.
This was the second launching of a Venus probe in fIve
days by the U.S.S.R.
Yesterday's probe, Venus 6, is scheduled to make a soft
landing on Venus in mid-May.
THE SATURDAY EVENING POST will cease publi-
cation with its Feb. 8 issue.
The Post, founded in 1821, has been loosing money for
the past ten years. The president of the Post said the maga-
zine was "a victim of changing times."

.. .
../

f#**'"

UNIVERSITY

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MSICAL SOCIETj

E
i
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I"
I
3
I
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E
I
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I
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Saturday and Sunday
LEFT-HANDED
GUN
Directed by Arthur Penn (Bonnie and Clyde), 1958
Screenplay by Gore Vidal (your favorite liberal)
PAUL NEWMAN
as Billy the Kid
One of the greatest and most realistic westerns ever
made; the forerunner in theme and style of Bonnie
and Clyde.
7:00 & 9:05 ARCHITECTURE
75c AUDITORIUM
4

r

I

COME TO
Student Book Service
and visit
LIZ HAHN
CLIFF
CAROL LOFTUS

a

I

Cycles sell
in Classifieds

TODAY AT
1, 3,5,7,9 P.M.

MIC14IGAN

gg.
interlude cuddles up to the subject
of infidelity with unblinking honesty!
oskar werner and barbara ferris per-
form with charm, intelligence
and ardent conviction!"
-PLAYBOY MAGAZINE
oskar werner is not to be
missed!he does everything
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FOX EASTERN TH EATRES ROA~-I
HELD OVER FOR ILLE
375 No.MAPLE RD.-769-1300

MWN.-MlI.
7:00-9:20
SAT.-SUN.
2:00-4:20-
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