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January 11, 1969 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-01-11

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Page Two.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday, January 1 1, 1969

Pzge . Two THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Saturday. January 11. 1969

I

cinema

California protests

- -
_ I I

The 'Negatives

approach to sex continue peacefully

TONIGHTat
Christopher and Sara
1421 Hil5t.
330 P

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i'

By HENRY GRIX
Negatives,..now showing at the'
Fifth Forum, is so lewd, it is
ludicrous. Perverse and shame-
lessly bad taste, the film leaves
the . viewer wondering what is
really wrong with a good old
dirty movie.
Indeed,. there is much that is
right with this- one.-.It is grotes-
quely ,overpho.tographed, which
is appropriate for a film whose
punches are all visual. The
movie is an annoyingly impres-
sive display of the talents of
camera man Ken Hodges and
editor'-gone-wild Barry Vince.
Peter Everett, together with
Roger Lowry, adapted his novel
for the screen, but he must have
intended his book to be seen.
And director Peter Medak
takes Everett's cue, doing his
best to disguise the fact that
Negative is really just a skin
flick..
He extracts well-tempered
performances from his three
principles, Peter McEnry, Diane
Cilento and Glenda Jackson. He
plays off the elements of pop
culture and sordid farce as if
directing a tour of the Twilight
Zone, conducted by Alfred.
Hitchcock.
But the plot gives the whole
thing away. McEnery, mild-
mannered antique dealer, and

Miss Jackson, his wild, enamor-
ed mistress, get their kicks at
night feigning love making in
turn of the century garb. He
is Dr. Crippen, the patient wife-
killer, and she his willing wife.
But he never kills her. In fact,
"When it comes to the action,
you are a fool, just like Crip-
pen," she brays.
Into their complicated little
lives strides photographer Miss
Cilento, bow-legged, blonde and
buxom. In a rough .German ac-
cent, she demands a room int
McEnery's flat.
"We English must bore you."
McEnery sighs.'
"Not really," she answers.
"You don't know it, but I've
been watching you, five, six
days maybe."
Obviously, the mysterious lady
has moved in to watch the freak
show. She is a bit of a freak her-
self, appearing at first to be a
nymph, and later a confirmed
lesbian. Really, she is a camera.
The cameras do great things.
They play through a wax mu-
seum where Miss Cilento allures
McEnery in the, shadow of Dr.
Crippen and a Goodwill' band.
They overexpose, underexpose
and juxtapose images in a
,manic make-out scene.
Incidentally (apparently), Mc-
Enery's father is dying. He dies.

Meanwhile, Miss Cilento is
luring McEnery with her body
and the possibility of being the
Baron von Richthofen, World
War I flying ace. He succumbs.'
In fact, he buys a World War
I fighter plane and plants it in
the garden. There he goes to
play without Miss Jackson. She
is angry, and also mad.
The tragic climax follows, as
all good climaxes should.
Unfortunately, with all the
trappings of a good movie, Neg-

atives is short on substance and
padded with sex. More unfor-
tunately still, Negatives fails
because sex in cinema is no
longer as arresting as it used to
be, Even preposterous farce
about sex is no longer compel-
ling.
While the voyeur in each of
us is bound to be appeased by
so insolenta film as Negatives,
the pocketbook of each of us is
cheated.

- music
IRuibin stein added

(Continued from Page 1) 1300 teachers. The school says it
,the creation of a black studies represents 22 per cent.
program. Attendance at the 18,000-stu-
Earlier in the day, the student dent campus was estimated at 50
union and the administration per cent, with some classes nearly
agreed to a truce, and a state of empty and others full.
emergency was lifted. It banned . Hayaka 'a said checks are be-
public assemblies and restricted ing made on teacher absences, but
the campus to students, teachers proof of absence might be diffi-
and staff members. The school has cult.
about 16,000 students. At Queens College in New York
At San Francisco, State, picket- City, Joseph Mulholland, director
ing was in support of a strike of a program aimed at providing
called Jan. 6 by the American hher education for Negroes of-
Federation of Teachers. fered to resign if those involved
in the program would give him a
The action was in defiance of chance to defend himself and then
a court's temporary order restrain- vote for him to resign.
ing striking and picketing. The The college's 26.00n students re-
union is due in court Tuesday for turned to classes peacefully yes-
a hearing on whether the order terday, after student demonstra-
should be made permanent. tions forced cancellation of classes
For the union it was the fifth for two days.
day of the strike. Both Gov. Ron-
ald Reagan and the acting college
president S.I. Hayakawa have told? HI
teachers that five consecutive MA R C H
days of absence constitute auto-
matic resignation. WASH I N GTON
The union says it represents T
more thanj400 of the school's
-I

Bac
Boston
conten
originc

S$1.00 cover inclues free food
-

k from
n to sing
mporary
dn C
ali music

91

!l

1
I
i
i
i

* * MAD MARVIN IS BACK * * *
and welcomes you back to the finest in "total cinema"
at the Vth Forum. Thur., Fri., Sat., Sun. at 11:00 P.M.
stop by . .. you won't be disappointed.
* separate admission *'

A special recital by pianist Ar-
tur Rubinstein has been added to
the University Musical Society
schedule for this semester.
The concert, to be held Jan. 22
in Hill Aud., has been included
in the UMS series as a nonsub-
scription event. It will mark
Rubinstein's 14th visit to Ann Ar-
bor since first appearing here in
1938,
The piano virtuoso is currently
making his 32nd U.S. tour. With
more than 50 RCA recordings to

ENCO URAGg QUALITY:
U' offers 10 teaching awards
despite lack of nominations

his credit, covering the entire
span of music written for the
piano. Rubinstein has generally1
been recognized as one of thet
world's foremost pianists.
Slated for the program of hisr
Ann Arbor concert are works by
Schubert, Villa Lobos, Beethoven,
and Chopin. Tickets for the con-
cert, which are available at the
UMS ticket office in Burton Tow-
er, are on sale for $7, $6.50, $6, $5,
$3.50 and $2.50..
COME TO
Student Book Service
and visit
I CINDY SZADY
MARY BENNETT
SUE SHEETS
-_ _

The most complete
supply of
NEW and USED TEXTS
and PAPERBACKS
is at the
Student Book Service

1.
2.1
3.
4.

Ann Arbor Movement Center
Liberation Classes
Counter-Inauguration March
Counter-Inauguration Ball
BUS TICKETS NOW

1I

*1

2527 SAB

1-6 P.M.

Phone 761-3252
or 769-1400
Sponsored by
Mobilization Committee to
End the Vietnam War

I

=Now"

By LARRY EISENBERG
For the second year students
are being asked .- encouraged,
really-to nominate teaching fel-
lows for /the VJniversity's Out-
standing Teaching Fellow Award.
But for .the second year in a'
row there is. a ,dearth of nornina-
U-W"paper
disciplined
Coptinuedt from Page 1)
with charges based on cost and
free office space.
Miss Steinzor.said the editors
are. investigating the possibility
of becoming completely indepen-
dent' of-the university.
Theactioinofthe regents, Miss
Steinzor said, was largely "a way
of doing something without losing
face." The resolution was sup-
ported by liberal .regents, who
wished 'to avert more seyere action,
she added,-
Regent Walter Renk was - one
of the three who. opposed the ac-
tion. He said he-.voted against it.
because the, resolution was not
strong enough. Anotherregent,
Gordon Walker, said he voted for
the proposal because, "As far as
I'm concerned, the paper has gone
to hell."
University President Fred Har-
vey Harrington termed the refusal
of the editors to appear at the
meeting . "deplorable.'

tions for the ten awards of $350
each.
"People who are most interested
in teaching are often overlooked,
especially teaching fellows," says
Dan Fitzpatrick, secretary of the
selection committee. "These're-
wards are intended to encourage
high quality teaching."
The, committee has received
only about a half dozen nomina-
tions now, but is confident more
will come in before the July 15
deadline.
There are two other awards
which students are encouraged to
make nominations for, the Dis-
tinguished- Undergraduate Teach-
ing Award and the Distinguished
Service Awards. Both are open to
instructors, assistant professors
and junior associate professors.
The teaching and s e r v i c e
awards, which have been awarded
since 1959, were previously open
only to nominations by members
and administrators, but has been
open to student nominations for
the last two years. The deadline
for the faculty awards is April.
Although the committee favors
recommendations from students
for the teaching awards, all mem-
bers of the University community
are invited to submit nominations.

Fitzpatrick says recommendations
have even been submitted by wives
for their husbands.
To be eligible for the teaching
fellow -award, a candidate must
have completed one full year as a
teaching fellow at the University
or have had two years experience:
here and be serving as an aca-
demic counselor when nominated.
They must also be pursuing a:
master's or doctoral degree.
The granting of the awards will
be announced at the President's
awards luncheon in the spring.
.

Info 662-6264
bad cops
and ther
cops-and
there's

HELD OVER
4th WEEK
Shows at: 1:00-3:00-5-00-7:10
and 915

THIS WEEK 7 FILMS
a three hour cinematic trip*
0 HUEY
the story of Huey Newton and the Black Panthers.
! LISTEN, WHITEY
Black reaction to the assassination of Dr. King.
w WEST AFRICA, ANOTHER VIET NAM?
Feature length. The guerrilla movement in West
Africa against the Portugese. Including an actual
attack on the Occupying Colonial Army! "This is THE
movie on guerrilla warfare"-Peter Werbe, editor,
Fifth Estate.
" HUELGA!
Cesar Chavez narrates. The California Grape Strike,
why
* PLUS RIOTOUS HUMOR with Wig Wag, an early
"drag" comedy, our continuing Buck Rogers space
serial, and a Betty Boop cartoon.

f

odpirW~r~rpwwIL

TODAY AT
1, 3, 5, 7, 9. P.M.

4-m

Dial
86416

"A memorable, completely fascinating film."
Richard $chickel,1

Life

i

STEVE MCCUEEN
AS EIJIJJLI"
M SU ESTED FOR MATURE AUD FICES TECHNICOLOR" FROM WARMER BROS.-SEVEN ARTS
Next attraction: - "YELLOW SUBMARINE"

I

NEXT WEEK: AN EVENING OF COMEDY GREATS
W. C. Fields, Laurel and Hardy, Marx Bros.,
Chaplin, Keaton.
COMING: Andy Warhol's Epic: CHELSEA GIRLS

*1

CORRECTION
The review of "Candy" in
yesterday's Daily was written
by Daniel Okrent. His byline
was inadvertently; omitted.

flan with
The Balloons
a Carlo Ponti production starring
INumbki fulrunn*thlur i Spook
Produced by Carlo Pontia directed by Marco Ferreri
,%trbuted byZESigmaX- a Filmways company

I

"ARTiST Y& EROTICISM"

U

1.

I

I

Cue Magazine

N.Y. Times

TONIGHT

l~I mi

wI

1

"THE MOVIE HAS THE CAREFUL TEMPO OF A MINUET,
WHICH COUNTERPOINTS ITS DESPERATE EROTICISM!"
N.Y. Times

I

I

I

"SURELY THIS IS
AMONG THE MOST
EROTIC OF MOVIES!
The movie's artistry
raises the subject
matter to the level
of personality
exploration, THE
EXPERIENCE IS
BIZARRELY
COMPELLING !'9
Cue Magazine
rerLEAVES NOTHING To

jA HIGHLY EROTIC
FILM! IT SHOULD
BECOME A CAUSE
CELEBRE WITH THE
WHATEVER-TURNS-
YOU-ON SET! Glenda
Jackson is really
tremendous!
ENGROSSING!
OFFBEAT AND
DIFFERENT!99
WINS Radio
"6SEXUAL AND INVECTIVE
AND PERFORMANCES OF)
MEMORABLE QUALITY!"
N.Y. Post

0

#I

I

I

THE IMAGINATION!1
GOES TOO FAR!"99
N.Y. Daily News A BIZAF

RRE MODERN DRAMA OF A MAN AND TWO WOMEN
LOCKED IN A SENSUAL GAME OF SEX.

®I

f I

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