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February 07, 1969 - Image 7

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-07

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Friday, February 7, 1969

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Puce Siv n

Friday, February 7, 1969 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

.Pors' .Seven~

.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official -publcation of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN for~m to
Room 3528 L.S.A. Bldg., before
2 p. m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum, or two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only,
Student organization notices are
not accepted for publication. For
more information, phone 764-9270.
FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 7
Day (al(itdu r
Bureau of Industrial Re'ations Sem-
inar: "Management of Managers. Pro-
gram No. 80": North Camplus Commons, '
8.00 a.m.
College Industry Conference: Chrys-
ler Center Auditorium, 9:00 a.m.
South and Southeast Bag Lunch, Al-
len Whiting. Political Science Dept.,
"China and South and Southeast Asia',
Lane Hall Basement, Friday, Feb. 7,
noon.
Dept. of Naval Architecture & Marine
Engineering Seminar: Dr. Som D.
Sharma, "Optimization of Multi-hull
Configurations on the Basis of Wave
Pattern Measurements.' Friday, Feb. 7,
3:30 p.m., Room 325 W. Eng.
Asronomical Colloquium. 4:00 p.m.
Roonm 296 Physics-Astronomy Bldg.
Hugh D. Aller, Astronomy Department,
will speak on "Polarization of Variable
Radio Sources at 8000 MHz."
All faculty and students are invited
to attend an Open House in honor of
Dr. Leslie A. White, Professor of An-
ORGAN IZATION.
NOTICES
Hillel Foundation: 1429 Hill St., Fri.,
Feb. 7th, 5:45 p.m. - Traditional Serv-
ices 7:15 'p.m.; Hillel Student Services,
8:30 p.m. - "The Gates of the Forest"
(a special program on the philosophy
and- works of Eli Wiesal); Sat., Feb.
8th - 9:15 a.m. Traditional Services.
Hot Flamenco Guitar Music: to be heard
from Carlos Montoya - at Hill Audit.
Friday night - Feb. 7th at 8:30. Tickets
are on sale through Friday 9-5 at Hills'
Box Office.
"Freedom and True Identity" is the
subject of a Christian Science Lecture
to be heard at 8:00 p.m. Friday nite,
Feb. 14th in the UGLI Multi-purpose
loom.
* * * *
UM Amateur Radio Club: Meeting
Fri., Feb. 7th, 8:00 p.m. Room 1042
East Engin. Guest speaker: Mr. Donald
Grimm of Collins Radio, Topic: Ama-
teur Radio Equipment".
.* * * * .
Arab Students Association: "Perspec-
tives for Peace In the Middle East" Dr.
Ibrahim Abu-Lughod, Prof. of Pol. Sci.
and Assoc. Director of the African
Studies Program, Northwestern Uni-
versity, 7:30 -p.m., Social Hall, F i r s t
Methodist Ch. State and Huron Streets.,
UM Folkdance Club will not meet
this Friday because of World Fair.
I I M III
EE

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

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thropology, 510 E. William, Friday, be-'
ginning at 5:00 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: Marta Minu-
jin - Angell Hall, Auditorium B, 7:00
p.m.
Cinema Guild: ExperimentaltF II m
Program: Architecture Auditorium,
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.
Inter Co-op Council Concert: Carlos
Montoya: Hill Auditorium, 8:30 p.m.
Creative Arts Festival: The Once
Group: League Ballroom, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Broadcasting Service: WUOM Radio
(91.7 Mc.) 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. daily;
Friday 11:00 a.m. The Eleventh Hour
(repeated at 7 p.m.) Ed Burrows hosts
an hour of news and conversation
about the arts and literature. Guests:
Maynard Klein and son John Reid
Klein. Friday 9:45 p.m. National Negro'
History Week Lecture Series: Prof. Hol-
lis Lynch, University of Buffalo, on
"The Pan-African Impulse among Afro-
Americans in the 19th Century'. A De-
partment of History Lecture.
Saturday 1:00 p.m. National Negro'
History Week Lecture Series: Prof. Gil-
bert Osofsky, University of Illinois at
Chicago Circle. on "Puttin' on Ole
Massa: The Significance of Slave Nar-
ratives". A U-M department of history
lecture. Saturday 2:00 p.m. Basketball
- The U-M vs. Michigan State Univer-
sity, reported by Tom Hemingway from
the Events Building. Saturday 5:15 p.m.
Jazz Revisited, with Hazen Schumach-
er - Exotic Themes. Saturday 7:30 p.m.
The Record Collector, with Prof. War-
ren Good. Saturday 8:05 p.m. U-M
Bandorama - a delayed broadcast of
the 1968 concert featuring the Var-
sity and Concert BEnds, the Symphony
Band, the Friars, the Jazz Band, the
Chordbusters, the Dixieland Dreamers,
the Soft Shoe Seven, and the Marching
Band.
TV. Center program: On Sunday, Feb-
ruary 9 the following program produc-
ed by the TV Center will have its ini-
tial teevast InnDetroit: 12:00 Noon.
WJWJ TV, Channel 4 - Man in the
Middle: New Directions in Social Work:
"New Social Workers." Young social
workers and graduate students in the
field respond to criticism about social
work and discuss why they are enter-
ing the - profession.
Professional Theatre Program: Evan
Hunter's The Conjuror (World Prem-
iere): originally scheduled for per-
formances this week has been cancel-
led. The play will be rescheduled next,
fall.
L.S.&A. JUNIOR-SENIOR COUNSEL-
ING OFFICE ADVANCED CLASSIFICA-
TION APPOINTMENTS*
In an effort to minimize the time
required to make appointments with
counselors for Fall Term elections and
to help reduce the lines involved the
Junior-Senior Counseling Office in the
College of Literature, Science, and the
Arts has initiated a procedure for mak-
ing these appointments. As you will
note below the fields of concentration
have been listed in four groupings. If
you will find your field of concentra-
tion in the lists and\ determine your
group number you will be able to se-
lect the appropriate dates on which
605 E. William
769-1593
BEYOND A
REASONABLE DOUBT j
FRITZ LANG, Dir, with
JOAN FONTAINE,
SIDNEY BLACKNER, and
DANA ANDREWS
-FRI. & SAT., FEB. 7 & 8
1:00 A.M. 75c downstairs

you may appear to make an appoint-:
ment.7
Group I--Anthropology, Anthro-Zoo,+
Astronomy, Chemistry, Classical Stu-I
dies, Far Eastern Lang. & Lit., FarI
Eastern Studies,LGeography,NGeology,i
History of Art, Linguistics, Near Eas-
tern Lang. & Lit., Microbiology, Phy-.
sics, Psych-Speech-Hearing, Russian
Studies, Slavic Lang, & Lit., Social An-
thro., Studies in Religion. Zoology.
Group II: American Culture, C o m -
munication Science, English, English
T.C., Mathematics, Mathematics T.C.,'
Philosophy, Social Work.
Group III: Biology, Botany, Econom-
ics, History, History T.C., Journalism,
Political Science.
Group IV: Cellular Biology, French.
German. Music Lit., Pre-Dent., Pre-
Legal, Pre-Med., Pre-Professional, Psy-]
chology, Romance Lang T.C., Sociology,3
Spanish, Speech, Speech Correction.
Graduating Seniors (That is those
graduating in August or Decemberi
1969 may appear on the dates indicat-'
ed below to make their appointments.
Group 1: Feb. 10 thru Feb. 17 -1
appointments made in department of-1
fice.
Group II: Feb. 10, 11. appointments'
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Group III: Feb. 12, 13, appointments
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Group IV: Feb. 14, 17, appointments1
made at 1223 Angell Hall.'
Second Semester Sophomores, All
Juniors and All Seniors (who have not
previously made appointments) appear3
on the dates indicated below to make'
their appointments:
Group I. Feb. 10 thru Feb. 17, ap-
pointments made in department office.
Group II. Feb. 18, 19: appointments
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Group III: Feb. 20, 21: appQintments
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
Group IV: Feb. 24, 25: appointments
made at 1223 Angell Hall.
In order to facilitate this proced-
ure it will be necessary to maintain
strict adherence 'to the above schedule'
and for you to appear in person to
make the appointment. Students who
do not make an appointment during'
the scheduled period for their groupI
will have to wait until February 26,
or thereafter.
Although you are asked to make your
appointment as per the above sched-
ule you will not be at a disadvantage
if you ate in one of the later groups

since all the appointment times (from
March 3 to April 11) for your field of
concentration will be available on the
first day your group is scheduled to
make appointments.
Students wishing to see a counselor
regarding current elections or related
matterssbefore advancedrclassification
begins should see the regular recep-
tionist in 1223 Angell Hall or the ap-
propriate departmental secretary to
make an appointment.
* Students with less than 55 hours
elected at the end of the current term
should follow the appointment pro-
cedure arranged by the Freshman-
Sophomore Counseling Office, 1213 An-
gell Hall. All Honors program students
should disregard these procedures and
make their advanced classification ap-
pointments in 1210 Angell Hall be-
ginning on March 3.
Applications for Graduate S t u d e n t
Dissertation Grants may be submitted
up through the closing date of Wed-
nesday, March 12, 1969. Late applica-
tions cannot be accepted because of
the tight schedule. Two other oppor-
tunities for application will be provid-
ed during the year; one in October,
another in January. Exact deadlines
will be announced. The students are
expected to have a clear statement of
the research problem together with the
estimated cost of each major expendi-
ture connected with it. The project
should have been reviewed by mem-
bers of the doctoral committee and
carry a letter of endorsement from
the doctoral chairman or the chairman
of the department.
Guidelines and a format for t h i s
submission can be obtained In the
Fellowships Office, Rackham Building,
Room 1014; information by calling ex-
tension 4-2218.
Doctoral
Examinations
Gary Wright Ferguson, Zoology, Dis-
sertation: "The Geographic Variation
and Evolution of Stereotyped Behavn-
ioral Patterns of the Side-blotched Liz-
ards of the Genus Uta (Iguanidae),"
on Friday, February 7, 1969 at 2:00 p.m.
in 2009 Museums. Chairman: D. W.
Tinkle.

Placement
GENERAL DIVISION
ROOM 3200 S.A.B.
Several Currently received announce-
ments are available in the career plan-
ning division of placement services,
dealing with opportunities for work-
study, financial aid, M.A.T., M.B.A.,
PhD, and other programs of study.
Chicago Chapter American Marketing
Association is holding INTRO (In-
dustry's New Talent Recruiting Organ-
ization) for students recently graduat-
ed in all curricula at grad or under
grad levels. More than 150 companies
will be representing the most progres-
sive American corporations. Confer-
a ence free to all students attending,
registration fee is returned. Registra-
tion materials and partial list of par-
ticipating companies are at the Ca-
reer Planning Division of Placement
Services. Application deadline is Feb.
24, '69. Conference is March 27, 28, 1969,
at Sheraton-Chicago Hotel.
Colorado College, Colorado Springs,

Co., offers Masters in arts in second-
ary school program. Subject areas of
Hist., Govn't., and Econ. and Poll.
Sci. 15 mo. program.
Duke University offers cooperative
program for prospective teachers as fel-
lowships in a Master of Arts Program
2 programs fo seconday teaching, areas
of study in French, Engl., math., biol.
and soc. sci.
Institute of International Education
booklet on Grants for Graduate Study
Abroad for 69-70 is now on file in the
Career Planning Division. This is a
directory of such grants by U.S. Gov't,
(under Fulbright-Hays Act), Foriegn
grants, Universities, and private don-
ors.
University of Michigan International
Center has applications for tuition
scholarships for foreign students.
International Center; U of M, is of-
fering 4 special meetings on Wednes-
day, Feb. 5.
George Washington University, Wash.
D.C., offers program for elementary
teacher education July through fol-
lowing June program. NEDA loans are
avail.
Human Resources Research and
Training Institute, Albertson L.I.,
N.Y. offers summer fellowship in re-
search, educ., voc. trng. and rehab. of.
disabled and retarded.
Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore,
Md., offers MAT program, 1 year, or
(Continued on Page 10)

STUDY IN
CU ERNAVACA
Learn to speak SPANISH
* Intensive courses, with drills,
supervised labs, and theory
taught by experienced Mexican
teachers.
" $135 per month.
Study in the INSTITUTE FOR
CONTEMPORARY LATIN
AMERICAN STUDIES.
+ Examine themes such as "Protest
and its Creative Expression in
Latin America" and "The Role
of Education in Social Change"
in 10 to 30 new courses each
month.
" Access to excellent library.
+ $30 per credit.
Live in CUERNAVACA
+ Near Mexico City, at 4,500 feet
elevation, with Mexican families
or in dorms or bungalows.
* Approx. $80 per month.
Request catalog from
Registrar - Cidoc W.
Godot, Apdo. 479,
Cuernavaca, Mexico
DAILY CLASSIFIEDS
BRING QUICK RESULTS

- WKNRE
SPECTACULAR
STARRING

I

If War, Poverty,
Education or Disease
don't bother you
Don't Bother Us
Room 3529-S.A.B.
Feb. 3rd-7th

I

* PLUS *
THE SPIRIT
and
"Worst That Could
Happen"
THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE
Sun., Feb. 9 at 8 P.M.
MASONIC AUDITORIUM
Tickets: $5, $4, $3
Available at: Masonic Aud
and' oil J. L. Hudson &
Grinnell stores.
----

Paperback
BOOm&K SALE
Today at
F OLLETT'S
STATE STREET AT NORTH UNIVERSITY " ANN ARBOR

M1964VLLAGER INOUSTRIES INC,

I

f

For Direct Classified Ad Service, Phone 764-0557
Monday through Friday, 10:00-12:30

r
'Ir

1
_,

FA'

'2

JUMBOY

~aKs IUE W~sTVALe fre A O(N
RE, Pick' Hleys FO R THE 1~e Ji65LoO~~S
JjWs, e S CP4sk- LQ~ S, haTsCOAs1 KnIWQR,
F1C WeJR, upI6E~ie 83MP Ac:eiC&56IeDY We a~p Now

I

V

M-M-m-m-m, yummie!
A giant hamburger at / lb. 'U.S.
Govt. pure beet topped with let-
tuce, tomato, mayonnaise, onions,
pickles and ketchup
ALL THIS FOR ONLY
49c
MItNG ®PEEDY (ERvicE
West of Arborland

_
:
,r.!.
r
y r
f _
M
1
--- _ .

it's IN to eat out
STEAK and SHAKEI

Char-broiled Rib-eye
Steak and Eggs
Potatoes and Toast
$1.60

r Try Irl I I I

Char-broiled
Hamburger Steak
Potatoes, Salad
Bread and Butter
$1.40

I.

1313 S. UNIVERSITY

THE ALTERNATIVE*
STUDENT-FACULTY
CO-OP COFFEE HOUSE
-Needs broad student support. Your share will help
create a unique meeting place for students and faculty.
Only five dollars each (refundable) on sale in the Fish-
bowl this week.
Got ideas for decor, activities, etc.?
CALL PETE NIETO, Manager, 769-0048.
* Endorsed by SGC and Graduate Assembly
(Affiliated student organization: Friends of the Alternative)j

ii

,i,:.
I ' ,r
};..
l
¢
fi

, I7
I/

DeLong's Pit Barbecue
Features these CARRY-OUT DINNERS:

Old I eidelberg
211-213 N.Main St 668-9753

Bar-B-Q Ribs Shrimp
Bar-B-Q Chicken Fish
* Fried Chicken Scallops
' Bar-B-Q Beef Oysters
All Dinners include Fries, Cole Slaw and Bread
Open: Mon., Wed., Thur.-Noon-2 A.M.;
Fri., Sat., Sun.-Noon-3 A.M.
Delivery Service
314 DETROIT ST.

A-11 L 1j 1 . - 1

wNaw-., f .1.J

665-2266

I

Friends of the Alternative announce a
DINNER BENEFIT for the Alternative
i -Tacos, Chili, Kosher Coney Dogs
(10% Disfount for shareholders)
Basement NEWMAN CLUB, 331 Thompson
SUNDAY, FEB. 9, 6:00 to 8:30 p.m.

THE BAGPIPER
1200 S. University Ann Arbor
FINE TRADITIONAL CLOTHING
0 GRAND RAPIDS 0 KALAMAZOO 9 GRAND HAVEN

RESTAURANT
State Street on the Campus
Roast Young Tom Turkey
Homemade dressing, whipped potatoes, tossed garden salad,
hot roll and butter-$1.65

I

"

Open 7 Days a Week

8 A.M.-8 P.M.

HEALTH SERVIC NFORMATION

University Health Service is now seeing stu-
dents on an appointment basis in an effort
to decrease waiting time and more effi-
ciently schedule doctors' time. A certain
number of appointments will be reserved
each hour for emergency walk-in patients.

For special services or information, call your
Health Service or

own doctor at
764-8320

Emergencies, any hour
Tuberculosis contact

764-8320
764-8330

NO 3-3441
Located in Scenic Northern Ann Arbor Area (Dixboro)
ri
BEST SELECTION OF SEAFOOD IN ANN ARBOR AREA
the fish you eat today played yesterday in Gloucester Bay"

Specializing in German and American Food
Bring your family for Easter Dinner
Easter Baskets for Children
Dancing Friday, Saturday, and Sunday
Friday and Saturday Starting 9 P.M.
Sunday after WOIA 12:30-4 P.M. Broadcast
Serving Complete Dinners 1 1 a.m.-2 a.m.
City Parking Lot in rear of Restaurant
Closed Mondays
For Fine
ITALIAN &
AMERICAN
COCKT'AILLUNGE
SPAGHETTI _ PIZZA LASAGNA
Featuring: Giant Italian
Sandwiches & Aged Steaks
CARRY-OUT SERVICE
ON ENTIRE MENU

For appointments call:
No specific doctor
Dr. Robert Anderson

Dental emergencies
Problems relating to women .
students: (Infections, pre-marital

763-0284
764-8331

Dr. Thomas Clark
Dr. Max Durfee
Dr. Paul Durkeea
Dr. Albert Girz

764-8325
or 764-8326
764-8336
764-8338
764-8334
763-0284
"~ i1'

advice, contraceptive advice,
mentsrual problems)
Problems relative to Male

764-8335
or 764-8327

764-7385
Male doctor
Female doctor
Female doctor
Female doctor

students: (Infection, pre-marital
advice, contraceptive advice)

764-8336
764-8330

/ :5- :5 vLf i _

-I

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