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February 07, 1969 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1969-02-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Friday, February 7, 1969

TH'MCIGNDAL.F.ay eb"ry7 16

2nd Annual Ozone Festival
with
COMMANDER CODY and his
LOST PLANET AIRMEN and
OZONE PRODUCTIONS
EE EATS Doors open 8 P.M.
NITE and SATURDAY $.50

A REAL JAM:
Music Lit enrollment reaches
new heights in Burton Tower

Dictionary to define
inidel ynglishe words

iI

By SHARON WEINER of her course, because "I don't1
Students are almost hanging + like to teach big sections, nor do i
from the bell ropes of the Burton I like to turn away students."
Tower carillon to study music And others, like Prof. Richard
literature this semester. Crawford, have "invited all fresh-
Enrollment in the course is al - men and sophomores to leave," al-
ways heavy but this term,- ovei- though he adds, "I'd just as soonl
crowding in the course has reach- teach 200 if there were spacel
ed new heights. available."
The reason, says Dean James But chances for better facilities4
Wallace of the musicschool, is --r additional staff-are not
that music literature courses were . ~ - ___
never closed during pre-registra-
tion last fall. As a result, up to 1
120 students are jammed intoo
And with lectures given in Bur-
ton Tower, many students and "
professorsbhave found the newfMVXe5d rear
space problem almost intolerable.~
"The tower was built for bells,
not for classrooms," says f'Prof. By STAN BENJAMIN
William Malm. Windows cannot Associated Press writer
be opened in the winter, and the
75-student legal limit, which has WASHINGTON- The Fed-
been ignored this semester, is a eral Communications Commis-
tight fit. sion's plan to sweep all cigarette..'
When the new, music building advertising off radio and tele-
wahcomlet, there ws bdind vision-if it gets the authority
was completed, there was a 'kind --sdrw srng ricsm
of agreement not to use Angell -has drawn strong criticism
Hall for music literature courses' from the tobacco and broadcast-
says Taylor. And since many music ing industries, but was welcomed
literature courses are offered to by the American Cancer Society.
non-music majors they must be FCC Chairman Rosel H. Hyde
held on Central Campus, in Bur- Wednesday announced t h e
ton Tower.' agency's 6 to 1 decision to issue
Faculty response to the over- a "notice of proposed rule mak-
enrollment this semester has ing" as the first step toward the
varied. Some, like Taylor, accept ban.
the situation, although "It isn't The FCC, however, can take
particularly rewardpg to lecture no action before June 30, when
to an overcrowded class." a 1965 law forbidding new reg-
Prof. Judith Becker is volun- ulations is scheduled to expire.
tarily teaching an. extra section The Tobacco Institute, the
_ _

good. According to Wallace, the
music school is not anticipating
an expansion of the program.
This year's squeeze in music
literature won't be repeated next
semester. Classes will simply not
be overenrolled The fire marshal
has decreed a strict enforcement-
of the 75 student limit for all
classes in the tower beginning this
spring.

igarette ad ban
tion from Cong

By LAU]
Thus swived
teris wyf,
For al his kee
jalousye;
And Absalon
nether ye;
And Nicholas
The tale is do
al the rowte
To help you
stand these lin
The Canterbur

National Association of Broad-
casters, tobacco-state congress-
men and the one dissenting
commissioner, James J. Wads-
worth, criticized the action. The
broadcast networks declined im-
mediate comment.
In New York, the cancer so-
ciety - a long-time crusader
against cigarette smoking -is-
sued a statement welcoming the
proposal and expressing hope
broadcasters would accept the
recommendation.
The Tobacco Institute called
the announcement "an obvious
threat to usurp the congression-
al function," and said a ban
would be arbitrary and extreme.
Hyde told a news conference
there would be only two things
that might cause him to recon-
sider a complete ban: The
broadcasters could omit the ad-
vertisments voluntarily, or the
FCC might approve advertising
of low-tar-low-nicotine cigaret-
tes.
He made clear, howev'er, the
commission prefers a complete
ban.
The commission can take no
final action until after June 30,
when the law which requires
health warnings on individual
cigarette packages-while at the
same time banning any other
regulations-expires.
Congress could block the

FCC's aim by
or passing an
The FCC h;
parties until N
and until July
ers' comment
would not act
all comments
Hyde cited
by the Depar
Education and
ing that lun
about 50,00 Ii
emphysema a
chitis another
All of these
are related t
ing. The tob
contended-si
geon general
link in 196
smoking wasr
proven to cau
But the FCC
ing the supp
would thusa
odds with the
broadcasterst
tising promot
tion of the p
unique danger
ured in terms
deaths and d
Tobacco fir
$226.9 million
and televisio
about 75 per c
tising budget
the broadcast
Hyde deni
proposal amo
ship.
"I don't h
Amendment p
mission from
tising which
deaths of in
number pres
said.
One of its.
fied, was to
action can be
gress does n
lines."

RIE HARRIS sity is in the process of compiling
was this careen- a Middle English Dictionary.
A small office sharing the fifth
epyng and his floor of Angell Hall with various
astroionmy laboratories holds one
hath kist h~er ; of the best collections of Middle;
a English publications in the world.
is scalded in towte. The staff has almost everything
s sandednsage published from the years 1100 to
~on and Go 1500, th~e Middle English era, at
. their disposal. A few rare books
a to better under- are kept in the Graduate Library.
nes from Chaucer's Although it may seem that only
,y Tales, the Univer- a very esoteric group would be
interested in such material, Prof.
Sherman Kuhn of the English de-
S patmient, present editor of the
4i 'wy4 book, claims that anyone whose
interests involve a subject or
vocabulary from the years 1100
s to 1500 needs the Middle English
ic s Dictionary.
For a note of explanation of the
lines from The Canterbury Tales:
Srenewing the law 'swived' is translated as a slang
aother one. though not vulgar term for sexual
as given interested intercourse; 'keepyng' means ex-
May 6 to comment, ceptional care; 'nether ye' is
S7 to reply to oth- translated as other eye: 'towte' is
s. It promised it buttocks, and 'rowte' means the
before considering crowd.
S. Laws, records, a n d especially
figures reported surgical texts have been very
rtment of Health, helpful in outlining the amazing-
d Welfare indicat- ly large w o r d stock of Middle
g cancer claims English, says Prof. Kuhn. He says
ves each year and that the language itself derives
ind chronic bron- basically from Old English, Old
r 25,000. French and Latin with an influ-
diseases, he said, ence from Old Norse, Middle
o cigarette smok- Dutch and Low German.
acco industry has An explanation of the Middle
nce the U.S. sur- English meaning of "cercle" would
claimed such a .help illustrate the difficulty en-
4-that cigarette countered by researchers compil-
never scientifically ing this dictionary. The word has
use lung ailments. several spellings including cerkel,
sercle, serkel, circle, and cirkel.
C proposal, accept- Fourteen different senses of the
osed link, said, "it word existed at the time, includ-
appear wholly at ing "a geometrical circle," and an
public interest for anatomical pse, where it meant
to present adve- the uppermost layer of urine in a
ing the consump- urinalysis.
roduct posing this Research for the Middle English
r-a danger meas- Dictionary began in 1930. The first
of an epidemic of section was published in 1952. At
isabilities. the present time Kuhn, his Asso-
is' currently pour ciate Editor Prof. J o h n Reidy,
a year into'radio their assistants and numerous
n commercials- others have completed compila-
ent of their advef- tion through the letter 'K'. Kuhn
and 10 per cent of, said he believes it will take 10 or
ers' revenue. 12 years more to complete the
ed that the FCC book.

*I

w:

in litter
peoPle

unted to censor-
elieve the First
precludes the com-
prohibiting adver-
would cause the
ndividuals in the
ented here," he
aims, Hyde speci-
"give notice what
expected if Con-
ot provide guide-

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