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July 20, 1963 - Image 3

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-20

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s63 THE MICHIGAN DAILY I

TOTAL IN MAINE, PARTIAL HERE:
Eclipse of Sun To Facilitate Scientific Studies

By ALTON BLAKESLEE
Associated Press Science Writer
NEW YORK-The sun, earth
and moon have a date today for
a dazzling celestial treat-a total
eclipse of the sun.
For some ancients, an eclipse
was a case of a dragon swallowing
the sun.
For today's scientists, it's a rare
opportunity for a host of studies
and measurements, with some as-
tronomers planning to chase the
moon's shadow in airplanes, and
space satellites engaging in some
special snooping, too.
For the public, it can be an awe-
some display as the sky darkens
and the air cools, as stars appear
and the great pearly halo or cor-
ona of the sun springs into view.
Full Spectacle
Only a relative handful of Amer-
icans will be lucky enough to see
the full spectacle, for the eclipse
will be total only along a, path,
averaging about 60 miles wide,
sweeping across Alaska, Canada
and Maine. In Maine, totality will
occur between 4:42 and 4:44 p.m.,
EST, depending on an observer's
location.
But, weather permitting, almost
everyone else can see the sun par-
tially eclipsed as the moon swings
between the sun and the earth.
The sun will be 83 per cent cover-
ed in Ann Arbor, 94 per cent in the
Boston area, 49 per cent for those
in Miami, 77 per cent in Chicago,
54 per cent in Denver, and 34 per
cent in San Francisco, for exam-
ple. Hawaii loses out altogether.
Your eyes can be irreparably
damaged unless you take the
greatest precautions in watching
the show. Experts advise using a
double thickness of black and
white film which has been expos-
ed and developed to maximum
density. Ordinary sunglasses or
a hunk of smoked glass are by
no means safe enough; they warn.
Indirect Viewing Best

S U N
I
\ 11
iI
SHADOW OF i
THE MOON
-I-
SHADOW OF
THE EAR TH

During totality, the sun's outer
atmosphere or corona glows in
pale yellow and pearly white hues,
reaching hundreds of thousands
of miles into space. Behind the
moon's rim, scarlet tongues of
gases may come jetting up, the
solar prominences born of violent
reactions on the sun. As totality
ends, Baily's Beads may be spotted
again, then slowly the moon ends
its obscuring journey, full daylight
returns, sometimes to the puzzle-
ment of birds which had taken to
early roost.
The eclipse begins in northern
Japan about dawn, then the dark
racing shadow of the moon sweeps
over the Pacific, entering Alaska
near Nunivak Island, across the
Yukon Territory and Great Slave
Lake, over Saskatchewan, Mani-
tobe and Ontario and southern
Quebec, then into central Maine.
The path dashes out to sea at
Bar Harbor, Me., less than three
hours after it touched Japan.
Japanese astronomers and scien-
tists get the first crack at special
eclipse studies, and are setting up
for measurements of the pre-sun-
rise zodaical light and the colors
and polarization of light from the
sun's corona.
In Alaska, where the American
Astronomical Society is meeting at
the University of Alaska, profes-
sional and amateur astronomers
will have front row seats.
Some astronomers aboard a spe-
cially-equipped Royal Canadian
Air Force turbo-prop plane will
speed along the -moon's full shad-

ow path, hoping to win an extra 18
seconds of total eclipse over the
100 seconds available on the
ground.
A DC-8 rigged as a flying ob-
servatory is et to fly from Califor-
nia into the Canadian eclipse path
in a joint venture of the National
Geographic Society and Douglas
Aircraft Co.
Astronomers from the Hayden
Planetarium in New York and
Smithsonian Astrophysical Ob-
servatory in Cambridge and some
newsmen and photographers will
fly nearly eight miles high over
Maine for a super view of the
eclipse aboard a special American
Airlines Jet eclipse flight.
A Tiros weather satellite may
help forecast cloud conditions for
astronomers with equipment at lo-
cations on the ground, and other
instrumented satellites now circl-
ing the earth may, from their high
vantage points, take revealing
peeks at phenomena associated
with the eclipse.
Canadian, American, German,
British and Dutch astronomers
will work from pre-selected sites
on the North American pass of the
eclipse probing for new under-
standings and details of what
nature reveals when the moon
comes along to make the sun blink.
r , "'rWo , n ooun

locality and its figure
(such as 21.00)
To figure approximate
eclipse mid-point,
subtract 5 hours for
Eastern Standard Time,
6 for Central, etc.
Thus 21.30 in a
Central zone would
be 15.30, or 3.30 p.m.

el444itvstb ,* .G WA'.'-
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the ground. Or you can produce
them yourself by poking numer-
ous holes into cardboard held sev-
eral feet above the ground.
The big treats come to those
in the path of totality, and Maine
is expecting scores of thousands
of eclipse viewers, at least some
of them making the journey at
urgings of space-conscious young-
sters in the family. Television
cameras will try to record the big
show, too.
Moon Over Sun
Gradually the moon moves over

rim. Some observers may spot the
diamond ring effect, when light is
streaming through only a single
lunar valley.

3 3

ENDING -
TODAY

DIAL
8-6416

DIAL 5-6290
Hope
bags
that
most
elusive
of all
species.*~
an
Ekberg!

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
ity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TVPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.

Registration and Records window Num- -Prof. Ingrid Strom, Indiana Univer-
ber A, 1513 Admin. Bldg. sity, "Implications of Research for Eng-
lisl in Secondary Schools": Aud. B,
Aug. Teacher's Certificate Candidates: Angell Hall. . f
All requirements for the teacher's der- 4:15 p.m.-School of Music Degree Re-
tificate must be completed by Aug. 2. cital-James Miller, tenor: Aud. A, An-
These requirements include the teach- gell Hall.
a th statement :and

i
s
t
t
+4
f
l

In all arear where the eclipse the sun's face, and for a minute
is not total, indirect viewing as will cover it completely in Maine,
safest. One method is to make a with but one millionth of the sun's
small hole in a piece of cardboard, ordinary output of light and heat
and hold it toward the sun, let- coming to earth. The sky darkens
ting the sun's image ble projected to about half the light from a full
through the hole onto a white moon, and stars and planets be-
surface. On that tarket, you can come visible.
watch as the moon takes a bite For an instant before the sun is
out of the sun. entirely obscured, Baily's Beads
'Where sunlight is s h i n i n g may be seen-the last flashes and
through foliage, you may see many rays of sunlight shining through
little crescent suns projected onto valleys and gorges on the moon's

conoe .e
TEHNICOLOR
MARIO ANN
LANZA-BLYTH

;latrineA,
KATHRYN AVA HOWARD
GRAYSON "GARDNER'" KEEL t

I

STATING SUNDAY
"NEVER LET GO" & "THE GREAT CHASE"
HELD OVER 2ND BIG WEEK
Dial HELD T Matinees...$..75c
2-6264Eves. & Sun. $1.00
Children........40c

I

I

SATURDAY, JULY 201
Day Calendar
7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-Cinema Guild -
Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck, and Ed-'
die Albert in William Wyler's "Roman
Holiday": Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-Dept. of Speech Univ. Play-
ers Summer Playbill-George Bernard
Shaw's 'Androcies and the Lion": Ly-
dia Mendelssohn Theatre.
General Notices
Seniors: College of L. S. & A., and
Schools of Education,A Music, 'Public
Health, and Business Admin.: Tentative
lists of seniors for Aug. graduation
have been posted on the bulletin board
in the first floor lobby,, Admin. Bldg.
Any changes therefrom should be re-
quested of the Recorder at Office of

er-s +otn te n r rw t u
the Bureau of Appointments material.
The oath should be taken as soon as
possible in Room 1203 Univ. High School.
The office is open from 8-12 and 1-5.
Events Sunday.
School of Music Degree Recital
Carol Fenwick, pianist,' at 8:30, Sun.,
July 21, Lane Hall And.
Events Monday
8:00 a.m.-School of Public Health
Institute on Arthritis and Metalobic
Diseases - Registration: Room 3038,
School of Public Health.
2:00 p.m.-Audilo-Visual Education
Center Filn Preview-"A Fire Called
Jerimiah," "The French and Indian
War," and "The Cave Community":
Multipurpose Room, Undergraduate Li-
brary.,
4:00 p.m.--Dept. of English Lecture
Series, "How English Should Be Taught"

.. ,.

/I~ileIat MICHIGAN

Doctoral Examination for Robert
Frank Adams, Economics; thesis: "De-
terminants of Local Government Ex-
penditures," Mon., July 22, 217 Econ.
Bldg., at 1:30 p.m. Chairman, W. H. L.
Anderson.
Doctoral Examination for Robert Lin-
dell Jones, Chemistry; thesis: "An
Electron Microscopic Investigation ofn8
the Adsorption of Long-Chain Fatty1
Acil Monolayers on Glass," Mon., July
22, 3000 Chemistry Bldg., at 1:30 p.m.
Chairman, L. 0. Brockway.
Placement
PLACEMENT, INTERVIEWS, Bureau
of Appointments-Seniors & grad stu-
dents, please call Ext. 3544 for inter-
view appointments with the following:
TUES., JULY 23-.-
Des Moines- Community Playhouse -
Seeking a Technical Director, with
background in Scenic Design. Position
will be equivalent of Assistant Direc-
tor. Would like to interview men or
women with such desire and back-
ground.
WED., JULY 24-
Socony Mobil Oil Co.-Seeking men1
with any degree in any field- of con-
centration for Marketing Training Pro-
gram. Socony Mobil has no formalj
Mgmt. trng. prog. as such. Instead,
Management & administrative person-
nel are selected from among the Mar-]
keting & Sales Promotion Trainees.-
Several openings in Detroit as well as
world-wide locations.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Management Consultants in Detroit-
Seeking Personal Secretary to Manager
of Professional Placement Co. in North-
ern Mich. Secretarial skills, interest in
Personnel field. Any degree. Recent grad
with above average scholastic standing.
Age 21-25. Desire attractive, exception-
ally intelligent young woman who can
organize & work independently without
supervision. Potential to advance to
staff position.
Oregon Civil Service-Vocational Re-
habilitation Specialist I-Must meet
one of the following requirements: a)
MA in Vocational Rehabilitation; b)
Degree plus 2 yrs. exper. as vocational
rehab. counselor; c) Degree plus 3 yrs.
exper. in counseling & guidance, so-
cial work, educ., personnel mgmt., pub-
lic employment service, or business
mgmt.
For further information, please call
General Div., Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.

i

,,-A

Sundjay, July 21, at 5:30 p.m.
SUNDAY SUPPER. CLUB
4.;."delicatessen at its finest"

College Libra

"Half of our four-year collegesI
and four-fifths of our junior col-I
leges are inadequate as education-t
al institutions if we. really believeI
that the library is essential to edu-
cation at the college level," Uni-1
versity Library Director Frederick
H. Wagman said yesterday.
Addressing the American LibraryI
Association at its 1963 ChicagoI
Conference, Wagman said, "Fail-
ure to improve the majority of the
existing college libraries . . ., may
prejudice the opportunity for the
intellectual growth of hundreds of,
thousands of our young people."
Wagman claimed that college
students are forced to use public
libraries, special libraries and li-
braries available in the urban
areas 'in an effort to overcome
the inadequacies of the book col-,
lections of their own institutions."
However, he said, few of these oth-
er libraries offer the student need-
ed resources.
The inadequacies of university
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
Gamma Delta, Hayes State Park
(Irish Hills) for 11 a.m. Service & all-
day outing of Northeastern Region of
Gamma Delta, July 21, meet 10:15 a.m.,
1511 Washtenaw.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Worship &
Communion, 10 a.m., Prof. E. Roma
speaking on "The Philosophy of John
Dewey," 7 p.m.; July 12, Hill at S. For-=
est.
Graduate Outing Club, Picnic-Swim,
Sunday, 1:45 p.m., Rackham Bldg.,
Huron St. Entrance.
U. of M. Friends of SNCC, Talk by
Rev. Albert Cleague of Detroit, July
23, 8 p.m., Union, Rm. 3G.

ries Lacking
libraries are equally as serious,
Wagman charged. "Few if any of
them can meet the demands for
book and reader space imposed by
the growth of the collections and
the increase in graduate and pro-
fessional enrollment."
He called "the intensified use of
books" one of the most significant
recent developments in higher ed-
ucation.
Strom To Speak
On Research Role
Prof. Ingrid Strom of Indiana
University will speak on "Implica-
tions of Research for English in
Secondary Schools" at 4 p.m. Mon-
day in Aud. B. The lecture is part
of the summer series at the Uni-
versity on secondary school Eng-
lish teaching.

Shows at 1-3-5-land 9 P.M
THE MOST WONDERFUL
ENTERTAINMENT EVEkR EVERI
COLUMBA fCRLS
3 A KO[MAR 00Y
t
JNEX WD ANN- NY B B"UME MED
1. NEXT: WALT DISNEY'S "SUMMER MAGIC"

NARRY SAITMN .AtBERI R. BROCCOLI
Bob IAnitaf
HOPO IEKb6rg

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Corned beef
potato chips,l

or pastrami sandwich; salad,
pickets, beverage and dessert.
only 75c

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STARTS DIAL
SUNDAY 8-6416

EUZABEH S EIS W
AND IN ADDITION
"THE /
GENERAL"
and 60 Years -*
of Great
Movie Chases

SUMMER 1963
(All showings Friday and Saturday at 7 and 9 P.M.,
except where otherwise noted.)
JULY 19, 20
William Wyler's
ROMAN HOLIDAY
Audrey Hepburn, Gregory Peck,

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
NO 2-4466
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm
Brown, Virgil Janssen.
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00 and 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
Staff: Jack Borckardt and Patrica Pickett
Stoneburner.
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
AND WESLEY FOUNDATION
State and Huron Streets. Tel. 668-6881
Dr. Hoover Rupert, Minister
Rev, M. Jean Robe and
Rev. C. J. Stoneburner, Campus Ministers
9:00 a.m. and 11:15 a.m. Morning Wor-
ship. "Believe the Best!" Sermon by Dr.
Rupert. This service is broadcast over WOIA
1290AM, 102.9 FM from 11:15 a.m. to 12:15
p.m.
SUNDAY
10:15 a.m. Seminar: "Our Mission Today"-
discussion, Pine Room.
TUESDAY
7:30 p.m. "Inquiry into Theological Issues"
Guild House, 802 Monroe.
n.Ai c"KyA

BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest Klaudt, Pastor
Rev. A. C. Bizer, Associate Pastor
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Worship Service.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m. Church School.
7:00 p.m. Student Guild
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:00 a.m.-Bible Study.
10:00 a.m.-Worship Service and Communion.
7:00 p.m.-"The Philosophy of John Dewey"
-Prof. Roma, Dept. of Philosophy.
PICNIC-Saturday, July 20-Meet at Center
at 2:30 p.m.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
James H. Pragman, Vicar
Sunday at 9:30 a.m.-Bible Class.
Sunday at 10:30 a.m.-Worship, Sermon by
Pastor Scheips on "MARK: A Failure Who
Succeeded" (Holy Communion).
Sunday at 10:15 a.m.--Gamma Delta meets
at chapel to leave for all-day Regional
Outing at Hayes State Park, Irish Hills.
Wednesday at 9:00-Discussion and Review
of Martin Luther King's book, "Strength
to Love."
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. John J. Fauser, Assistant
RELIGIOUS SCHEDULE
Sunday Masses at 8:00, 9:30, 11:00, 12:00
and 1,2:30.
Daily Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:00 and 12:00.
NO 2-3580

Cr)'

SA~BAAH

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH AND
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
512 and 502 E. Huron
Rev. James Middleton, Minister
Rev. Paul W. Light, Minister of Education
(Minister to students)
SUNDAY
n0 . _ M,,.rninWo,,,h,, le ,d by U of M

-ALL IN-
1! m

ST. ANDREWS CHURCH and the
EPSICOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION

Vlmff'

AMUM'DIMIX

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