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July 20, 1963 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-20

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY J

J.S. Track Team

leady for Soviets

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Drysdale Pitches LA to 4-2 Win

SCLASSIFIEDS

MOSCOW AP)-Bursting with
infidence, potato salad and Finn-
a milk, the United States track
id field team opens its ,annual
o-day meet against the Soviet
nion here today, with an ex-
cted 100,000 in giant Lenin Sta-
u.
All the Americans are fit ex-
pt ace distance man Jim Beatty,
vored to win the 5,000, who went
tck on the question mark list
sterday.
lart Tops
Fro ield

PGA

DALLAS () - Dark horse Dick
Hart, the expectant young father
Waiting for the telephone to ring,
overcame steamy heat and mount-
ing pressure yesterday and held
his lead in the Professional Golf-
ers Association Championship with
a four-under-par 36-hole score of
66-72-138.
The game's greatest champions
fired and fell back in a day of
scorching, 100-degree heat, clus-
ters of bogeys and withdrawals at
the 7,046-yard, par 71 Dallas Ath-
letic Club course.
Defending champion Gary Play-
er of South Africa, his driver wild
and his putter cold, blew himself
out of contention with a 74-75-
Palmer Still Off
Arnold Palmer, the sport's out-
standing gate attraction and num-
ber one favorite, failed to snap a,
tenacious slump in shooting a sec-
ond round 73 for 147-nine shots
back of the unshakeable young
pace-setter.
Going into today's third round
'with the field reduced to the low
75 players and ties, the 27-year-
old Hart had a three-stroke ad-
vantage over U.S. Open champion
Julius Boros, Tony Lema and Shel-
ley Mayfield, a Dallas club pro-
fessional, tied at 141.
Another stroke back at 142 were
Masters champion Jack Nicklaus,
fighting an unwieldly-putter; scat-
tershot Doug Ford, 1955 PGA
champion; and a transplanted
Spaniard, Miguel de la Torre of
Milwaukee.
The dry Texas heat was so sear-
ing that former Open champion
Jack Fleck, Don Fairfield and
Jim Ferree quit midway of the
0econd round.
Like-Sahara
"This is like the Sahara Des-
ert," said Fairfield, as he dropped
out at the 12th hole.
"I would like to go somewhere
and hide for three weeks," said
Palmer, the all-time leading mon-
ey winner seeking the only major
title he has not won. "I am tired,
hot and disgusted with myself."
Hart, a shy, good-looking young
man whose wife is back in Hins-
dale, Ill., momentarily expecting
their second child, refused to be
upset by the scorching sun or the
blistering pressure from the game's
name stars.
Starting with a three-stroke
lead after firing a sensational
opening round 66-which included
1 hole-in-one on the 16th hole-
he didn't miss a shot until the
eighth where he overdrove the
green, chipped short and took a
bogey five.
Finishes Strong
He lost another shot at the 10th
but rapped in a birdie at the
206-yard 13th, where he put his
tee shot eight feet from the pin,
nd then he proceeded to march
home like a potential champion.
It was different for Boros, Lema,
Mayfield, Nicklaus, Ford and Aus-
tralia's Bruce Crampton.' One by
one, they collapsed under a cas-
cade of bogeys.
Nicklaus' usually reliable putter
was Just another slab of cold and
defiant steel. The chubby Masters
king playing remarkably from tee
to green with his powerful game,
three-putted three greens, took a
total of 39 putts and wound up
with a score of 73.

"I'll warm up before the race,"
Beatty said. "If I can run, I'll
run. I came a long way for thi
meet." Beatty has a sore right
leg muscle, which kicked up again
Wednesday. He hoped rest would
heal it.
See Biggest Victory
The American men's team was
primed for its fifth straight vic-
tory and its biggest margin ever
in the series. Last year at Palo
Alto they won, 128-107.
"They have two chances to beat
us," says Gene Johnson of Santa
Clara, Calif., "slim and none."
Yankee girls are aiming for
their best showing, although they
have never even approached the
Russian girls in the four previous
meets..
U. S. Coach Payton Jordan of
Stanford is gunning for the first
American edge ever in combined
totals of men's and women's
events, which is the way the Rus-
sians score it.
Korobkov Promises Surprises
The Russians are ready, too.
"We have a few surprises," said
Soviet Coach Gabriil Korobkov.
Jordan, apparently following a
pre-set plan, has systematically
eliminated any possible American
excuses. A positive thinker, he has
praised the current warm weather,
the stadium, the arrangements'
and his team.
NFL Drops
U=D's Gros's
By The Associated Press
CLEVELAND - The Cleveland
Browns released Jerry Gross yes-
terday after other National Foot-
ball League clubs had waived on
the 5'10" rookie quarterback from
the University of Detroit.

MILWAUKEE-Big Frank Ho-
ward cracked a pair of homers
and scored three runs last night
as the Los Angeles Dodgers con-
tinued their blistering pace by
defeating the Milwaukee Braves,
4-2.
In posting their 13th victory in
their last 15 games, the Dodgers
boosted their National League
McKinley
Passes Test
RIVER FOREST, Ill. (P)-Chuck
McKinley, Wimbledon champion
and Davis Cup star, advanced as
expected yesterday to the finals
of the 53rd National Clay Courts
Tennis Championships.
The 22 - year - old McKinley
scored a convincing 6-3, 6-3, 7-5
victory over unranked Herb Fitz-
gibbon of Garden City, N. Y. Mc-
Kinley's victory set up a cham-
pionship tomorrow against either
Dennis Ralston of Bakersfield,
Calif., or Ron Barnes of Brazil,
who meet today.
In the women's division, petite
Nancy Richey of Dallas, 20, ad-
vanced with a neat 6-1, 6-2 deci-
sion over rugged Judy Alvarez
of Tampa, Fla., in a semifinal
match.
The other women's semifinal
between Victoria Palmer, 18, of
Phoenix, Ariz., and Gwyneth
Thomas, 22, of Shaker Heights,
Ohio, also will be played today.
McKinley displayed little effort
in disposing of the 21-year-old
Princeton senior, ranked 45th in
the nation.
McKinley seemed to toy with
his taller opponent in the final
set by letting Fitzgibbon take a
4-3 advantage before winding up
the match.

By The Associated Press

lead to 7%1
cago Cubs.
into eighth
delphia.

Don Drysdale scattered six hits,
struck out 11 and walked only one
in beating Milwaukee for the first.
time in four decisions this year.
The fire-balling right-hander
lost a shutout bid in the seventh
when the Braves scored both their
runs, one on Hank Aaron's 27th
homer.
Howard, employed in right field
against southpaw Bob Hendley,
made the most of the opportunity.
He hit Hendley's first pitch in the
second for his 14th homer and
then unloaded on the first deliv-
ery to him in the fourth for an-
other. Seven of Howard's 15 hom-
ers have been against the Braves.

games over the Chi-
The Braves dropped
place, behind Phila-

Ruthven Sees Colleges
As Cheap SportFarms
By The Associated Pressf

r

Craig Drops 14th Straight
PHILADELPHIA-Roy Sievers
hit a two-run homer with one out
in the last of the ninth inning
last night, lifting the Philadelphia
Phillies to a 2-1 victory over the
New York Mets and dealing Roger
Craig his 14th straight pitching
loss.
Sievers' homer was the 300th of
his career and his ninth of the
year. The blow followed a triple
by Tony Gonzalez and was only
the fifth hit of the game
off Craig.
Craig now is 2-16. The right
hander has not won since April 29.
* * *
Friend Gets Some Runs
PITTSBURGH-Scoring behind
pitcher Bob Friend for the first
time in four games, the Pitts-
burgh Pirates banged out 16 hits

last night and routed the Chicago
Cubs 9-4.
Friend, who had pitched 30 in-
nings without having a run scor-
ed in his behalf, made sure he
would not be blanked again by
driving in the first Pittsburgh run
with a single in the third.
* * *
Taylor Relieves St. Louis
ST. LOUIS-Ron Taylor's strong
relief pitching carried St. Louis
to a 7-2 victory over the Houston
Colts last night and moved the
Cardinals into a virtual tie with
the Chicago Cubs for second place
in the National League race.
Taylor, who boosted his record
to 5-4, relieved Ernie Broglio with
a run in, runners on second and
third and one out in the top of
the third.
Rookie Routs Giants
CINCINNATI-Rookie Tommy
Harper drove in all five Cincinnati
runs with two homers and a single
and John Tsitouris pitched a four-
hitter last night, leading theReds
to a 5-2 victory over the San
Francisco's slumping Giants.
* * *
Pena Finally Wins
KANSAS CITY-Pitcher Orlan-
do Pena broke a personal eight-
game losing streak scoring the
winning run himself as the Kan-
sas City Athletics edged the Bal-
timore Orioles 2-1 last night.
Doc Edwards hit a home run
for the A's in the third after the
Orioles had taken a 1-0 lead and
Pena walked in the fifth, ad-
vanced to third on Gino Cimoli's
single and an outfield error and
scored on Ken Harrelson's sacri-
fice fly.
Nats Edge Twins
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
Don Lock's two-out single in the
13th inning drove in the winning
run last night as the suddenly-
surging Washington Senators out-
lasted Minnesota, 6-5.

PERSONAL
AFTER HAVING read the Personal
Column of the Michigan Daily, I have
come to the conclusion that it is one
of the most lewd, promiscious, porno-
graphic, suggestiive, pieces of litera-
ture that I have ever read.
YC F20
LOST AND FOUND
LOST-Diamond ring on July 16 near
N. Univ. and State. Finder notify HU
2-5760. A4
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-up and deliversy service
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
X
HI Ft & STEREO
HI Fl & STEREO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS
THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335
Guaranteed Diamond Needles
$5.95

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES I DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2 4C 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 overage words tc fine.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR SALE
2 BDRM. MOBILE Home, 5 miles from
campus. $1995. Call 5-8265. B14
20 MINUTES from campus, year round
log cabin, 2 bdrm. screened porch,
fireplace, picture window ;views hill-
side and river. Approx. 3 acred fenced
wooded lot. Fruit trees, etc. Lake priv-
ileges. $9000, liberal financing. Call
Mrs. Burnstein, University extension.
200 N. Campus. B13
NICE FURNITURE, dishes, objects d'art
are waiting for you at the Darwin's
House of Values-2930 S. State. B9
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster bed.
Call HU 3-5973.
REAL ESTATE
CALIFORNIA BOUND
One block from Haisley School. Large
lot, 10 large shade trees. Excellent
three bedroom home, study in full
basement, dishwasher. By owner. NO
3-0719. R
FOR RENT
510 LAWRENCE '2 bdrm apt. available
for' fall. Newly carpeted. Ideal for 3
or 4. Call 665-8825. 023
1336 GEDDES
4-man apt. available for fall. Air-condi-
tioned, dishwasher, carpeted, balcony
and many other fine features. Canl
665-8825 for appointment to see. 021
LOOKING FOR APT.? Campus loca-
tions for fall.= Wide selection of new
and redecorated bldgs. Call 3-0511
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Apts. Ltd., 530 S. Forest.
C20
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean and
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625. 0
Campus-2 Blocks
Several spacious studio, one bedrm., or
2 bedrm. furnished apts. Available
Aug. 20 and after. NO 3-7268. 024
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4 Call
663-0511 9 a.m.'till 5 p.m. APT'S. LTD.,
530 S. Forest. , 19

FIGHT SIDELIGHTS:
Liston, Patterson
Argue over Gloves

A former University president
claims colleges and universities
are becoming inexpensive training
grounds for professional athletics.
The statement is made by Dr.
Alexander Ruthven, president from
1929 to 1951, in his autobiography
"Naturalist in Two Worlds."
Ruthven says, "Professionalism
in college athletics is now com-
ing into the open, encouraged by
commercial and gambling inter-
ests." He says he isn't sure
whether or not colleges are en-
couraging student athletes for
some type of reward other than
fun but adds that he hopes
they're not.
Low Academic Standards
Ruthven says at some schools,
academic requirements for ath-
letes are ridiculously low. He says
there are more athletic scholar-
ships available now, and an in-
creasing number of bribery cases
are being uncovered.
In the years he served as
Michigan President, Ruthven said
he witnessed creeping profession-
alism in collegiate athletics. "In
spite of protestations of purity,
evidence accumulated that stu-
dents refused admission to Mich-
igan were admitted to sister in-
stitutions, sometimes with sub-
stantial stipends," he said.
As competition increased, rival-
ry for promising athletes increas-
ed. Procurement efforts were step-
ped up, stadiums enlarged, there
was more pressure for "athletic
scholarships," and commercial in-
terests entered the "bowl" busi-
ness.
Ruthven writes that profession-

alism "can be scotched, not by
directors and coaches, but only
by the faculties."
Saw Great Teams
Ruthven, 83; was president of
Michigan during the great Wol-
verine teams of H. O. (Fritz)
Crisler, Bennie Oosterbaan and
Harry Kipke.
During his presidency, Michigan
went, to the Rose Bowl twice, in
1948 and 1950.
A former football player (Morn-
ingside College) himself, Ruthven
says:
"More and more emphasis .is
placed in intercollegiate sports on
developing the talents of the few
--the best players. In short the
schools have become to some ex-
tent inexpensive farm clubs for
the professional leagues."

304 S. THAYER ST.
1304 S. UNIVERSITY

Major League Standings

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Los Angeles
Chicago
St. Louis
San Francisco
Cincinnati
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Milwaukee
Houston
New York

w
59
51
52
51
51
48
48
47
36
32

L
35
42
43
45
45
46
47
47
42
63

Pct. GB
.628 -
.548 7Y2
.547 714
.531 9
.531 9
.511 11
.505 111z
.500 12
.367 25
.337 2714

LAS VEGAS (JP)-A minor has-
sle involving the gloves to be
used Monday night when Sonny
Liston defends the heavyweight
title against ex-champ Floyd Pat-
terson flared up during yesterday's
meeting of the Nevada State Ath-
letic Commission,
Dan Florio, Patterson's chief
trainer, objected when he learned
belatedly that the fighters would
be able to wear any make of
glove they wished as long as they
weighed the required eight ounces.
Liston planned to use the foam
rubber Frager gloves and Patter-
son expected to use the horse
hair-packed Everlast gloves that
were used in their first fight last
Sept. 25 at Chicago.
What Gives?
"This is the first time I ever
heard of fighters being allowed to
use different make of gloves in
a title fight," said the veteran
trainer. Informed that Patterson
Slap Opens
'Li p'.Again
LAS VEGAS OP)-Cassius Clay
must have carried his heckling too
far with heavyweight champion
Sonny Liston. Clay said he was
slapped by the champ.
It happened, Clay said yester-
day, after he taunted Liston dur-
ing his workout Thursday at his
hotel.
"I was at the, gaming table,"
Cassius said, "and he came over
and slapped me.
"I didn't know whether he was
mad or playing, but it took two
special policemen to hold me off
him."

had agreed to this in the contract,
Florio said, "He probably didn't
read it .and thought everything
was all right."
This prompted commission
chairman John Gammick of Elko,
Nev., to ask, "Does he sign blank
checks."
The net outcome was that Flor-
io said,We'll 1use the Frager
gloves, too."
If the Chicago-made gloves add
anything to a fighter's punch,
Patterson could be in trouble. Us-
ing the other make Liston belted
him out in two minutes and six

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct.
New York 55 _34 .618
Chicago 51 41 .554
Boston 50 41 .549
Minnesota 50 43 .538
Baltimore 52 45 .538
Cleveland 46 47 .495
x-Los Angeles 46 50 .479
Kansas City 41 51 .446
x-Detroit 37 51 .420
Washington 34 59 .367
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Kansas City 2, Baltimore I
Cleveland at New York (ppd)
Boston at Chicago (ppd)
Detroit at Los Angeles (inc)
Washington 6, Minnesota 5
TODAY'S GAMES
Baltimore at Kansas City
Detroit at Los Angeles (n)
Clevelandat New York
Washington at Minnesota,
Boston at Chicago

GB
514
6
7
7
11
12 j
14x/
17%
23

I

MISCELLANEOUS
LATE, LATE SNACKS?
RALPH'S MARKET
is open every night
till midnight!
ANYTHING YOUR LITTLE
STOMACH DESIRES
709 Packard J7
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25-35 married. 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. Ji
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, medi-
cai legal, technical conferences, mim-
eographing, off-set. Quick-Accurate-
Experienced.
Ann Arbor Professional Service
Associates 334 Catherine
J2

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 4, Milwaukee 2
Pittsburgh 9, Chicago 3
Philadelphia 2, New York 1
Cincinnati,5, San Francisco 2
St. Louis 7, Houston 2
TODAY'S GAMES
San Francisco at Cincinnati (n)
New York at Philadelphia
Houston at St. Louis (n)
Chicago at Pittsburgh
Los Angeles at Milwaukee

GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. C2
HURON TOWERS A#ARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
C4
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS
Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
3 or, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still.
available for fal. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.

l

secondsc
Sept. 25.

of the first round last
Do or Die

Patterson said that he expects
to come out swinging, instead of
adopting a more cautious ap-
proach. After the incident of the
beard and mustache after last
year's crushing defeat, Floyd may
be determined to win or go out
on his shield.
The commission announced that
the automatic eight-count will be
used in the title fight, a ruling
that might help Patterson, who
is usually down even in winning
fights. Liston claims he never has
been down. In any event, he defi-
nitely never has been knocked out
while winning 34 of 35 pro fights,
his last 27 in a row.
While they were arguing about
gloves, the foul rule and other
moot points, Patterson was sleep-
ing at his desert retreat six miles
away from the gambling mills
after doing 3% miles on the road
in early morning before the ther-
mometer soared around the 105
mark.
Liston, who also had finished
his boxing chores earlier in the
week, confined himself to road
work and a few loosening up ex-
ercises. The closed circuit people,
SportsVision, Inc. disclosed they
had insured Liston for $105,000 to
assure his appearance.
* * *
LAS VEGAS OP)-Negro leaders
were expected to apply for a pa-
rade permit yesterday so they can
stage a protest against alleged
job discrimination at the Sonny
Liston-Floyd Patterson heavy-
weight 'title fight Monday night.
Leaders of the local chapter of
the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People
claim that Negroes are excluded
from the better jobs in Las Vegas
hotels.

FOXCROFT
APARTMENTS

South State near Hill. Designed and
furnished for 4, 5, or 6 student
occupants. 2 bedrooms each.

I

0
"
"
"
s

Most spacious available
Separate dining room
Air conditioning
Heat furnished
Extra storgae space

Call Kelly Newton, 3-2260, eves.

2-0110
C13

WANTED TO RENT
WANTED-Room for weekends (or will
share apt.) for '63-'64 school yr. Ph.
3-3244'after 6 p.m. L2
TRANSPORTATION

I

Drive Yourself...
AND SAVE
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan

0

I

RENT A TV THIS SUMMER

ENJOY THE WONDERFUL
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it ..~ 1 :v

WANT TO GET OUT?
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USED CARS
1956 FORD Fairlane, excellent condi-
tion. Radio, heater. Must sell immed-
lately. $375. NO 5-0086. N6
1960 FIAT-In good condition, less than
10,000 miles. Phone NO 2-2625. N10
1958 AUSTIN HEALEY 3000, wire
wheels, overdrive, white w/blk. in-
tenor, excellent condition. Call days
FI 9-1180, after 6 p.m. call 685-1741.
N5
BIKES AND SCOOTERS
'54 HARL-DAVIS.-74 motorcycle. 210
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1906 Packard Road
665-9281
Z3
BARGAIN CORNER

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NEW 19" G.E. PORTABLES

1 11

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