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July 11, 1963 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-Robert B. Ellery
THIS IS ALBANY, GEOiGIA-A center of the p aper shell pecan and segregation, even the main
shopping district is constantly patrolled by city police. Since 1961 the city has been the site of racial
strife. City bus service is no longer available since the Negro boycott. Two University of Michigan
students are currently working in the town with SNCC.
ALBA NY, GA.:
A Nice, Town If You're White

HeynsStudy
Investigates
MSU Merits
(Continued from Page 1)
would guarantee them financial
aid whether or not they became
finalists if they would express a
preference for Michigan State.
MSU Vice-President Gordon
Sabine said, however, that his
university sent letters only to
those merit scholars who express-
ed an interest in attending MSU.
He noted that MSU had turned
down some merit finalists who
did not meet MSU's entrance re-
quirements.
Univeisity Assistant Director of
Financial Aids Ivan Parker com-
mented that his office had spoken
to merit scholarship winners who
had received letters although they
had not written to MSU nor ex-
pressed any interest in attending.
Some on Scholarship
Forty-seven of the 190 fresh-
men finalists attending Michigan
State are supported by non-MSU
scholarships, Sabine said. Of the
remaining 143, some do not need
scholarships and received a $100
token award. The rest will be sup-
ported by MSU-sponsored merit
scholarships, he added.
Regular scholarship funds and
some special donations will finance
the MSU merit scholarships, Sab-
ine continued. He indicated that
while several donations had been
received for this scholarship fund,
none were particularly substan-
tial.
About half of the merit finalist
freshmen are in-state students,
Sabine said.
Heyns' study showed that MSU
has only been intensively seeking
merit scholars since 1960,
'U' Still Ahead
In 1955-56, the first year of the
merit program, the University had
nine winners while Michigan State
had one. The next year, 19 more'
came to the University and one
more attended MSU. The Uni-
versity added 24 more in 1957-59
while MSU gained two.
Beginning its intensive recruit=
ing campaign two years later,
MSU enrolled 10 finalists to the
University's 67. Last year, MSU
had 33 and the University 59. By
the end of 1962 MSU had grad-
uated five merit scholars and the
University 90.

NAACP Target: Educational Bias

By RUSSELL LANE
Associated Press News Analyst
CHICAGO (;) - A stepped-up
drive for greater racial integration
in public schools-North and
South-is being prepared by Ne-
gro groups in cities throughout the
country.
The blueprint was adopted at
the convention of the National As-
sociation for the Advancement of
Colored People held here last
week.
Roy Wilkins, NAACP executive
secretary, told the meeting that
such a drive is being pressed in
70 cities in 15 northern states.
Praise For Some
Wilkins said that historic steps
to eliminate racial imbalance and
segregation have been taken in
New York, New Jersey and Cali-
fornia, and court victories are be-
ing won, district by district, in
other states.
But, he said, "until our demand
for more sweeping effort by, gov-
ernment is met, our children will
be cheated of their futures."
Why is it important from the
Negro viewpoint?
Dr. Annabelle Carey Prescott, a
veteran Negro teacher, principal
and human relations director in
Chicago's public school system,
says, "Encaptulated schooling of
youngsters is not a sound prepara-
tion for life. We must come, and
quickly, to a situation in which
Professors
Hold Seminars
Four visiting social science pro-
fessors are conducting seminars
this summer as part of the train-
ing program arranged by the in-
ter-university consortium for po-
litical research.
Prof. Harold Deutsch of Yale
University and Prof. Robert Hy-
man of Columbia University will
consider comparative political re-
search. Prof. Deutsch's lectures
run through Friday and Prof. Hy-
man will deliver his talks July
16-19.
Prof. Joseph Tanenhaus of New
York University and Prof. Walter
Murphy, also of Columbia, will
consider "Research in Individual,
Behavior" July 30 to Aug. 9.

ROY WILKINS
. children cheated

n- -F

(Continued from Page 1)
broken up by two white blocks.
Many of the Albany Negroes do
not adhere to the "movement's"
boycott of downtown, stores, and
often shop with the whites. They
do not eat at the same lunch
counters because Negroes cannot
be served. Nor do they attend the
same schools, since Albany schools
are still segregated.
Maiy of the Negro schools are
new. One boasts an air-conditioned
To View Relations
Of Jews, Negroes
"Jew and Negro-Face to Face"
will be the topic of a lecture , at
Hillel today at 7:30 p.m. Dr. Al-
bert J. McQueen, study director of
the survey research center, will be
the guest lecturer.

I

gymnasium. But members of the
Albany movement claim that the
teachers in these schools in no
way compare to the physical value
of the buildings.
Albany is a city which receives
much of its news from outside
areas such as Atlanta. The city's
one daily newspaper is edited and
published by James Gray. Gray
also owns Albany's television and
radio station.
Like most of his. neighbors, he
is an ardent segregationist, and
opposes any action by those in-
volved in the "movement."
The drive for equality by the
"movement" on the one hand, and
the opposition to it by the whites
on the-other, makes the situation
in Albany a "powder keg."
The air in- the Negro areas is
one of fear and determination. It
is the air of a 12 year old Negro
girl who would love to swim il the
Tift park pool but is afraid of join-

ing in the demonstration for fear
of being beaten.
Albany is volatile, ready to boil.
It is a city; where law, legal rights,
civil liberties and persennel se-
curity for those working with the
Negroes sometimes falls down. It
is a city with a racial problem and
no visible solution.
Daily reporter Andrew Orlin
recently returned from four
days in Albany, Ga. He was ac-
companied by Jean Tenander
and Robert B. Ellery, both of
whom will be contributing
stories to this series. Ellery, a
photographer, also took many
pictures in Albany, one of
which appears above.
There can be no middle road in
this city. No white residents speak
out for the Negro cause. A citi-
zen in' Albany is either for segre-
gation and the "Southern tradi-
tion" or for equality and citizen-
ship for the Negro. Moderates fa-
vor the slow progress of the courts
and hence the maintenance of the
status quo.
Albany, Georgia, once in the
front pages of national newspa-
pers, is seldom in the headlines to-
day. But the problem that once
got into the papers still exists. It
is a problem which exists in the
North but dominates the South. It
is the problem of Negro equality.
Tomorrow - Albany's white
community.,

all young people can meet and
learn to associate in their forma-
tive years."
Double Harm
In its program adopted at Chi-
cago, the NAACP said that segre-
gated schools "are psychologically
and educationally harmful to all
children, Negro and white."
The convention directed local
chapters to continue picketing,
boycotts, sit-ins, and other peace-
ful mass demonstrations "if state
directives for desegregation are
not quickly implemented on a lo-
cal level."
The overall objectives of the
NAACP look something like this:
-To change those practices.
contributing significantly to de
facto segregation and all other
discriminatory education practices.
Princeton Plan
--To urge adoption of rezoning,
including steps on the lines of the
Princeton plan in which assign-
ment of pupils is made by grades
to schools combined in a single at-.
tendance area, reorganizing the
use of schools, changing feeder
plans of elementary to secondary
schools, and other effective de-
segregation plans.
-To support open enrollment
except where other plans can be
used to achieve greater desegrega-
tion.
-To locate new schools on sites
offering maximum desegregation

and to insure that other school ex-
pansion plans provide desegrega-
tion.
Housing Units
--To oppose location of new
schools in segregated housing
units.
-To oppose "mobile" or port-
able units which'extend segrega-
tion.
-To oppose and change the
neighborhood school policy when-
ever its misuse results in segre-
gated schools.
--To urge . . . assignment of
children from overcrowded to un-
der-utilized schools: the Princeton
plan for large groups of schools in
adjacent segregated, integrated
and white areas, and location of
new secondary schools outside of
segregated areas.
Prince Edward County
The NAACP resolution assailed
the board of supervisors of Prince;
Edward County, Virginia, for 'cut-1
ting off public funds for public.
schools during the last five years."
In general, the convention said,
"We condemn the evasive tactics
being employed by some Southern
states to use public funds in the
form of state and local tuition,
grants to maintain and support
private segregated education."
"The association," it said, "will
continueto insist that, along with
student desegregation, Negro tea-
chers and administrators be as-
signed throughout the school sys-
tem on the basis of professional
merit and without regard to race
or color."
New York Plan
The New York Plan announced
last month by James E. Allen,
state education commissioner, es-
tablished as a guideline for elimi-
nation of racial imbalance in pub-
lic schools a limit of 50 per cent
Negro enrollment for any school.
He set a Sept. 1 deadline for sub-
mission of compliance plans by lo-
cal boards of education.
The California Plan, as set forth
by the state board of education,
requires school authorities to take
ethnic factors into consideration
when drawing school boundary
lines. As part of its policy to elim-

inate segregation -- de facto or
otherwise-the board has told
school authorities they must not
be "color blind" but most consider
the racial composition of schools
in an effort to promote desegre-
gation.
'U'Sponsors
Conference
I
The University's 1963 summer
speech conference will be held to-
day in Rackham.
Area meetings will begin at
9:45 a.m. to discuss the following
topics, "Television: Education's
Toughest Challenge" by James F.
Macandrew, director of broadcast-
ing, New York City Schools, and
"Processing of Contextual Signals
by the Binaural System" by Prof.
Earl D. Schubert of Indiana Uni-
versity.
The morning general session will
cover "Clinical Practice in Speech
Pathology" by Prof. H. Harlan
Bloomer, director of the Speech
Clinic.
The luncheon speaker will be
Prof. Ernest J. Wrage of North-
western University, president of
the Speech Association of Amer-
ica. His topic will be "Antidote
to Anonymity."
The conference will conclude
after an afternoon session at
which four more papers will be
presented.
ZINDELL OLDSMOBILE
.' I,

For. Complete Collision
and Body Shop Service
l Call
Ann Arbor'NO 3-0507
--Free Estimates-
All Makes of Cars

AU

NO

AIR-CONDIT ONED " STARTING TODAY 0
DIAL M"La Dolce Vita" Shown
8-6416 at 8:30 p.m. only
"Les Laisons Dangereyses"
Shown at 6:50 p.m. only

Ik

SUMMER 1963
(All showings Friday and Soturday at 7 and 9 P.M.,
except where otherwise noted.)

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DAILY OFFICIAL, BULLETIN
o"tav."r " t~a:.v"o.v..vs..t;: . .... ..!.. . ... .**..*.... .....,....} }" {r" :J' 1S ..{.,. {.::i}}.. .""ti^g:".{l>..

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no-editorial
responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Building
before 2 p.m. two days preceding
publication.

July 12, 13
Eisenstein's POTEMKIM
Flo. 1 of the best twelve films of alt time-
Brussels 1958 film critics poll of 120 critics
from 26 countries.
Plus two vintage
CHARL1E CHAPLIN comedies..
This program will be shown at silent speed.
AT ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
ADMISSION 50 CENTS t

MATINEE....75c Dial
Eves., Sun. . $1.00-5-6290
Children ... 40c *r5-f6290 i Modern Goo '

I tell you, chum..aughs it is! -
PARAMOUN
{ COMhE DIoVYGUo HR
TECHNICOLOrit Is
LEE J. MOLLY BARBARA L
COBB - PICON - RUSHW"STJOHN
OAN a t. PtiYLs TONY
BLOCKER' McGUIRE" BILL

THURSDAY, JULY 11
Day Calendar
9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.-School of
Public Health and School of Social
Work Institute on the Admin, of Med-
ical Care for the Needy-School of Pub-
lic Health,
9:00 a.m.-Dept. of Speech Summer
Speech Conference-Registration: Rack-
ham Lobby.
2:00 p.m. - Audio-Visual Education
Center Film Preview - "109 Days to
venus" and "Universe": Multipurpose
Room, Undergrad. Lib.
7:30p.m. - Linguistics Curriculum
Committee Linguistic Forum Lecture-
John J. Chew Jr., Foreign Service In-
stitute, "A New Interpretation of Pitch
in Japanese": Rackham Amphitheater.
8:00 p.m. - Dept. of Speech Univ.
Players Summer Playbill-"Two for the
Seesaw": Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Doctoral Examination for Wilma
Irene Russell,: Education; thesis: "An
Investigation of the Opportunities Pro-
vided for Teacher-Pupil Planning in
the Student Teaching Experience at
the Secondary School Level," Thurs.,
July 11, 3203 UHS, at 3:00 p.m. Chair-
man, S. E. Dimond.

ing of Naval Officers will furnish in-
formation on all Navy Officer pro-
grams.
POSITION OPENINGS:
\Library of Congress - Various open-
ings including: Assistant Chief for the
Binding Div.; Music Cataloger for
Copyright Office; Head, Editing & Pub-
lishing Sect. for Copyright Office; Asst.
Head, European Exchange Sect. for Ex-
change & Gift Div.; Manuscript Spe-
cialist, Amer. Cultural History for
Maunscript Div.; Electronics Techni-
cian for Music Div.; etc.
Dept. of Navy, David Taylor Model
Basin, Washington, D.C. - Associate
Technical Dir. for Hydromechanics.
Degree in Physics, Naval Arch. or En-
grg. and preferably a PhD in ene of
the Physical Sciences, Engrg. Disci-
plines or Math. 3 yrs. specialized exper.
in research and dev. work requiring
prosecution of unique and unusual
technical problems in hydromechanics
or related scientific disciplines.
Freeman-Hascall, Rutland, Vt. - The
Rutland Free Library has a position
open for a Director. Library serves a
20,000 population. Library degree re-
quired. Should have interest in Public
Relations and working with commun-
ity groups.
City of New York Civil Service-The
following openings are available: School
Lunch Manager; Public Health Nurse;
Assistant Accountant; Laboratory Aide;
Social Investigator Trainee; College
Secretarial Asst.; Social Case Worker;
Recreation Leader; Asst. Actuary; Asst.
Statistician.
For further information, please con-
tact General Div., Bureau of Appoint-
ments, 3200 SAB, Ext. 3544.
WELCOME!!
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!!
" AIR-CONDITIONED
" NO WAITING
" HAIRSTYLING
"Headquarters for Collegians"
The
DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

I

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J EAN NE MOREAU and GERARD PH I L I PE
in
"LES LIAISONS DANGEREUSES"

..

Foreign

Visitors

ameo mac,,of, ,uraa,* wlc,, mw" touao em the pteti
NORMAN LEARsiBUflYORKIN-BUD YORJIN -NORMAN LEAR'NHOWARD W.KOCH- ftYISOr E sIMNN

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Following are the foreign visitors pro-
grammed through the International
Center who will be on campus this week
on the dates indicated. Program ar-
rangements are being made by Mrs.
Clifford R. Miller, Ext. 3358, Interna-
tional Center.
D. E. Deshpande, S. R..Jhaveri, E.
Pereira, R. Rangachari, Miss D. Bhoj-
wani, Miss Khan, Miss V. Mathrani,
Mrs. R. Muthanna, Students of Jour-
nalism, India, July 9-21.
44 Medical Students, Univ. of Got-
tenburg, Sweden, July 15-17.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENTS:
The Naval Officers Procurement
Team from the U.S. Navy Recruiting
Station. Detroit & the Naviator team
from the Naval Air Station, Grosse Ile,
Mich., will be at Angell Hall from 9:00
a.m. until 4:00 p.m. daily from July
16 through July 18. This team consist-
ORGANIZATION
NOTICES

Dial 2-6264
UTiTE

STARTING TODAY *
Shows at 1-3-5-7 and 9 P.M.
Evenings & Sunday . $1.00
Weekday Matinees .....75

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joti8 COLUMBIA5GflJRE
RA KOHLMR=iDNEY,
f-ouTO

I

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GRAD MIXER
MICHIGAN UNION
ANDERSON RM. FIRST FLOOR
Friday, July 12, 1963
9 to 12 p.m. Stag or Drag
ONE DOLLAR DONATION
REFRESHMENTS
Arden Miesen's Band
Sponsored by
Graduate Student Council

: }
'
_
.
,.. . .
. :..

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Gamma Delta, Lutheran Org., Con-
cordia Lutheran Jr. Col. campus for
picnic supper and tour, July 13, 5:30
p.m. Meet at 1511 Washtenaw.
U. of M. Friends of SNCC, Perform-
ance by Elks Negro Drill Team, July
12, 7 p.m., Diagonal.

R

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/W/#e AT MICHIGAN

I

"Class. Feel You Aren't Communicating

TONIGHI-T at 7!30 anm.I

I OT NR 1111

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