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July 11, 1963 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-11

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E FOUR THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDA

itzgerald Named to Coaching Post

MAJOR LEAGUE ROUNDUP:
Giants' Errors Give
Phils .10-2 windfall

CLASSIFIEDS

Dennis Fitzgerald, whohas been
many things-from the slowest
football halfback in the Big Ten in
1960 to the Pan-American wres-
tling champion at 177 pounds in
1963-will be the newest addition
to Coach Bump Elliott's stable of
football assistants.
Fitzgerald was recommended to
the Board in Control of Intercol-
legiate Athletics at Michigan yes-
terday, and his official appoint-
ment is expected to be routine.
A 1961 graduate who won three
letters each in football and wres-

tling, Fitzgerald will receive the
position of freshman football
coach. He is also to assist wrestling
Coach Cliff Keen in some capacity,
although Doug Blubaugh is al-
ready the assistant coach as such.
Dufek Moves Over
Fitzgerald will take over the
freshman football squad from Don
Dufek, who is moving over to the
new position of defensive back-
field coach. Hank Fonde will re-
main backfield coach in charge of
the offense.

The appointment will bring the
number of Elliott's assistants to
six. The others are Jack Fouts, in-
terior line; Bob Holloway, line
and defense; and Jocko Nelson,
ends.
This is the first change in
Michigan's alignments of football
coaches since Elliott was brought
in to replace Bennie Oosterbaan
as head coach in 1959. Elliott
brought Fonde, Fouts and Nelson
with him then.
It will be up to Fitzgerald to try

P1 mer Down Nine in 'Open'
As Rodgers,_Thomson Lead

to help rebuild Michigan's foot-
ball machine, which last year
dropped all the way to last place
in the Big Ten.
Becomes Backfield Regular
Fitzgerald's credentials are im-
pressive. After working up from
the popular "Raiders" defensive
unit his sophomore year, he ulti-
mately became the starting right
halfback as a senior on a team
which compiled a 5-4 record. He
had enough power as a runner to
make up for his lack of speed and
size.
He was also a two-time Big Ten
wrestling champion, at,167 pounds
as a junior and at 177 pounds as
a senior. Fitzgerald remained ac-
tive in wrestling after graduation,
winning the Western Hemisphere
title at his weight division this
year and just completing a Euro-
pean tour of seven countries with
the United States' Greco-Roman
wrestling team.
He was originally a product of
Ann Arbor St. Thomas High
School, where he lettered in three
sports but did not wrestle.

ST. ANNE'S, England () --
Phil Rodgers, a wise-cracking for-
mer United States Marine, and
Peter Thomson, a four-time win-
ner from Australia, tied for the
first-round lead in the "British
Open Golf Championship yester-
day with three-under-par 67s-
nine shots ahead of defending
champion Arnold Palmer.
Palmer, a 2-1 favorite to grab
his third successive title, couldn't
control his tee shots and wound
up with a frustrating 35-41-76.
This means he will be pressed to,
survive the second-round cut to-
day when the field is'reduced to
the low 45 and ties.
Jack Nicklaus, the beefy U.S.
Masters championhremainedUin
contention with 32-39--71, but the
other five Americans, like Pal-
mer, had trouble staying close to

the par 34-36--70 of the 6,757-yard
Royal Lytham and St. Anne's
course.
All in 70s
Starting out in rainy, blustery
weather and finishing in bright
sunshine, Doug Sanders, the tele-
phone-boothswinger from Ojai,
Calif., and Herman Barron, U.S.
seniors champion from White
Plains, N.Y., each shot 75. Jack"
Isaacs of the Langley Air Force
Base in Virginia matched Pal-
mer's 76 and Bob Marshall, an
outsiderhfrom Huntingdon Beach,
Calif., shot a 79.
Spectacular putting produced
the brilliant pace--setting rounds
by Rodgers, a 25-year-old regular
of the U.S. tour, and Thomson,
a diminutive stylist from Mel-
bourne who won four British

"?

SPORTS SHORTS:
Sikes Leads Publinx
As Top Medalists Fall'

Opens in the space of five years
between 1954 and 1958.
They had a stroke lead over
Tom Haliburton, 48-year-old for-
mer English Ryder Cup player,
and Bob Charles, a left-handed
New Zealander who has won some
$18,000 this year on the American
tour, tied at 08.
Weather Shifts
Only two other players were
able to beat St. Anne's rugged
par on the wild day, which saw
the weather switch abruptly from
miserable rain and wind to al-
most absolute calm.
They were Ken Nagle, of Aus-
tralia, the florid, husky Aussie
who beat out Palmer by a stroke
for the championship in 1960 at
St. Andrews, and dark horse Ra-
mon Sota of Spain, each with 69.
Nagle shot 32-37 and Sota 34-35.
Frank Phillips of Australia was
even par 70 and Sewgolum Sew-
sunker of South Africa was close
with 71. Gary Player of South
Africa also had his problems and
fired a scattershot 36-39-75.
Driver Balks Palmer
Palmer's miseries were caused
by a balky driver-the implement
which has been principally re-
sponsible for projecting him to
the pinnacle of the sport and pro-
ducing all-time money-winning
records.
"I couldn't drive a lick," the
Latrobe, Pa., golfing capitalist
moaned afterward.
Two Double Bogeys
He had two double bogeys. He
took a five at the short 12th,
where he dumped his tee shot into
a bunker and then, after blasting
out, three-putted from 25 feet. He
missed his drive at the par four
17th and wound up% with a six.
Nicklaus, challenging Palmer
for world golf honors, also had
trouble with his tee shots. After
going out in two-under-par 32, he
ran into driving trouble. He three-
putted the 10th for a bogey, took
a double bogey at the 15th where
he sliced his drive into the deep,
knotty rough and banged his sec-
ond shot across the fairway into a
clump of bushes. It took him four
to reach the green and then he
missed the putt for a fat afid cost-
ly six.

By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA - The Phila-
delphia Phillies, helped by loose
San Francisco fielding, walloped
the Giants, 10-2, last night for
their third straight victory.
With Willie McCovey hitting his
23rd homer and Orlando Cepeda
his 17th, the Giants led, 2-1, after
four innings-but their defense be-
gan to fall apart in the fifth.
Jose Pagan threw wild on an
easy double play ball after a pair
of walks, loading the bases. Roy
Sievers then singled home two
runs and Don Demeter and sin-
gled in another, routing left-hand-
er Billy O'Dell.
Then in the sixth, with two out
and runners at first and second,
McCovey dropped John Callison's
high fly in left for a two-base, two-
run error. Tony Gonzalez singled
home Callison for a third unearn-
ed run off relief pitcher Jack
Fisher.
* * *
Podres Three-Hits Mets
NEW YORK - Johnny Podres'
three-hit, 11-strikeout pitching
performance and an eighth-inning
home run by John Roseboro pro-
duced a 1-0 victory for the Los
Angeles Dodgers last night as the
National League leaders handed
New York's last-place mets their
11th straight defeat.
Roseboro settled the duel be-
tween Podres and Carl Willey when
he drove one of the Met right-
hander's pitches into the lower
right field seats at the Polo
Grounds with one out in the
eighth. Roseboro's homer was his
fifth of the season and the fifth
and last Dodger hit of the night.
* * *
Colts Edge Bucs
PITTSBURGH - The Houston
Colts jumped on Pittsburgh pitch-
er Bob Friend for two runs in the
first inning last night and went
on to defeat the Pirates, 2-0, be-
hind the combined pitching of
Ken Johnson and Hal Woode-
shick.

By The Associated Press
SACRAMENTO-Favored Dick
Sikes romped through the first
two rounds of the National Public
Links Golf Tournament yesterday
with the loss of only one hole, but
the tourney's three top medalists
all were ousted in a day full of up-
sets.
Sikes, in quest of his third con-
secutive Publinx title, battered
Major League
Standings
AMERICAN LEAGUE -

David Hellman of Waukegan, Ill.,
6 and 5, then trimmed John Ku-
rach of Detroit, 5 and 4. The Ar-
kansas golfer shot four under par
for the 27 holes he played over the
6,702-yard par 36-36-72 Haggin
Oaks golf course.
* * *
WEST JORDAN, Utah - Ex-
middleweight champ Gene Fullmer
tried again yesterday to train on
his injured right foot, but couldn't,
and scheduled another light work-
out today.
"The foot didn't respond as well
jas we had hoped after he worked
out a little Tuesday," said Full-
mer's manager, Mary Jenson.
"But until there is something
definite, we still plan to leave for
Nigeria Saturday."
Fullmer is scheduled to fight
middleweight king Dick Tiger in
Ibadan, Nigeria, July 27. The fight
was postponed once, from' July 13
to July 27, after Fullmer hurt his
foot three weeks ago.

DENNIS FITZGERALD
... wins coaching job

Woodeshick who pitched in the
AllStar game Tuesday, relieved
Johnson with the bases loaded in
the eighth inning and struck out
Smoky Burgess to retire the side.
Jay Finagy Wins
CINCINNATI-Al Worthington
and Bill Henry put down a ninth-
inning threat with a tight bit of
relief last night, preserving the
Cincinnati Reds' 3-1 decision over
the Chicago Cubs and Joey Jay's
first pitching victory in over a
month.
Worthington replaced Jay with
one out in the ninth after a walk
and Dick Bertell's double. Andre
Rodgers walked, loading the bases,
before pinch hitter Leo Burke lin-
ed out. Henry then came on and
fanned pinch batter Steve Boros
for the final out.
Stuart's Homer Beats Twins
MINNEAPOLIS - ST. PAUL -
Dick Stuart's three-run home run
in the 10th innink, his second
homer of the game, powered Bos-
ton to a 7-4 victory over Min-
nesota last night.
The first baseman drove in five
runs with the two blows.
Stuart blasted a delivery by
Twin relief ace Bill Dailey into
the left field bleachers with two
out in the 10th. It ended Dailey's
string of scoreless innings at 24
and tagged the Twins with their
seventh defeat in eight games.
Yanks, Lose-
Mars Now;
Joins Mantle
NEW YORK () - Roger Maris,
the New York Yankees' prize slug-
ger, will undergo rectal surgery
later this week and will be out of
action for a week to 10 days, Man-
ager Ralph Houk said yesterday
Maris is scheduled to be oper-
ated on tomorrow by Dr. John
Donaldson, a specialist, at Lenos
Hill Hospital.
The star right fielder, who has
been credited with carrying the
American League leaders' attack
in the absence of the injured
Mickey Mantle, missed the
Yankees, doubleheader at Cleve-
land Sunday with what was
thought to be a recurrence of a
back ailment thatshad sidelined
him earlier this season.
Flies Back Home
Maris flew to his home at In-
dependence, Mo., for the All-Star
game break but flew back here
after telephone consultation with
Dr. Sidney Gaynor, the Yankees'
team physician. Drs. Gaynor and
Donaldson examined the player,
and decided on surgery.
He has a .294 batting average
for the current season, his highest
in the majors, with 42 runs batted
in and 19 home runs..
With Mantle still recovering
from his foot injury, the defend-
ing world champion Yankees now
have $175,000 worth of outfielders
sidelined. Mantle is a $100,000 a
year player and Maris reportedly
receives $75,000.
Mantle Ready Soon
Mantle is rejoining the Yankees
in Los Angeles but is not expected
to be ready to play~ for another
week.
With Maris out, Houk-will use
left-handed hitting reserve John
Blanchard in right field against
right-handed pitchers and will
shift Joe Pepitone to right from
first base against left-handers,
with Harry Bright taking over at
first.
If Blanchard's hitting does not
pick up, Houk said he would move
Tony Kubek from shortstop to the
outfield and put Phil Linz at short.

I

HELP WANTED
PART TIME EMPLOYMENT FOR MALE
STUDENT - Duties involve care and
feeding of lab. animals. 6 a..-l0 a.m.
Monday thru Friday. Experience with
animals helpful but not necessary.
Apply in person -- Parke-Davis and
Co., 9 a.m.-3 p.m., 2800 Plymouth
Rd., Ann Arbor. An equal opportun-
ity employer. H3
USED CARS
'58 VW, Deluxe Sedan-Black with red
interior, sharp condition, radio. Only
$695. Call NO 2-8458. B8
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and. PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-up and deliversy service.
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X

BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan
PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAIR
119 W. Washington
X1
HI F1 & STEREO
HI FI & STEREO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS
THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335
Guaranteed Diamond Needles
$5.95
304S. THAYER ST.
1304 S. UNIVERSITY.
MISCELLANEOUS
VERY RELIABLE WOMAN who cleans
and helps with care of children or
invalids. Desires regular day, % day
or evenings. Mrs. Modica, HU 2-0454.
M12
Variety is the SPICE OF
RALPH'S MARKET
Picnic Supplies
Party Foods
Kitchen Supplies
Kosher Foods
709 PACKARD-OPEN TILL MIDNIGHT
M3
CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES:
BONDED BRAKE LINING
$23.95 Fords, Chevys, some Plymouths.
Always a good price on new tires and
batteries.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Main at Catherine NO 8-7717
81,
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales'
514 E. Washington
S2
TRANSPORTATION
Drive Yourself ...
AND SAVE"
pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS
Whit's Rent-A-Truck
HU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
G1

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DAYS
2 .70 1.95 3.45
3 .85 2.4C 4.20
4 1.00 2.85 4.95
Figure 5 average words te a line.
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. doily
Phone NO 2-4786
FOR SALE
NICE FURNITURE, dishes, objects d'art
are waiting for you at the Darwin's
House of Values-2930 S. State. B9
HI FI-Garrard RO-88 changer, Picker-
ing U-388T cartridge. Electro-voice
12TRXB speaker in Argos enclosure,
Knight 30 'W Mono. integrated Amp-
Pre-Amp. Will sell together or sepa-
rately. Sacrifice. Leave message for
Jim at NO 2-9890. B4

A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS FOR SALE-Antique four-poster bed.
ICalil RU 3-3973.

WANTED TO RENT
WOULD; LIKE TO RENT a house or
apt fronm JanT -JulyN1, 1964, while
attending the U of M as a Post-Doc-
toral Fellow in College Administra-
tion. Have three daughters. Ref-
erences furn'd. Write, Robert A.
Bohannon, 1015 N. Juliette, Man-
hattan, Kansas. L
PERSONAL
BETH-Really sorry about last night.
You could have counted to 10 a thou-
sand times and it still wouldnt have
done any good. Next time I will spe
cify which day, hour and year.
Cy F13
THE RESIDENTS of 706. E. University
proudly announce the birth at 4:15
a~m. July 5 of one pure white kitten.
Write Box 105 Michigan Daily with
suggestions for kitten's name.
IT IS NOT A FACT that 42% of the
people in the U.S. have blue eyes or
any related shades. The tendency to-
ward particular coloration is a rela-
tively unexplored field, and is there-
fore, unknown. (According to re-
search done by the Medical and Gen-
eral Libraries' staff). F9
CHRIS DEAR,
I know how upset you must feel
about this but really it isn't a big
thing . . . they usually aren't. Fur-
' thermore, if Jon does find out we
can always blame it on.him.
Dodgeingly,

ye

P12

SPORTS VIEWS:

I

New York
Chicago
Boston
Baltimore
Minnesota
Cleveland
Los Angeles
Kansas City
Detroit
Washington

50
47
45
47
45
44
41
36
45
30

p

L
31
38
37
40
39
40
46
46
47
56

Pct.
.617
.553
.549
.540
-.535
.524
.471
.439
.427
.349

GB
5
5.
6
6%
7% z
12
14/
15 x
22%

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Boston 7, Minnesota 4
(Only game scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
New York at Los Angeles (n)
Boston at Minnesota (n)
Detroit at Chicago (n)
Baltimore at Washington (n)
Cleveland at Kansas City (n)
NATIONAL LEAGUE

Raw Meat, Wood Chopping
To Condition 'Different' Clay,

Los Angeles
San Francisco
St. Louis
Chicago
Cincinnati
Milwaukee
Pittsburgh
Philadelphia
Houston ;
New York

W
51
48
46
45'
46
43
41
41
34
29

L
33
38
38
38
40
40
43
44
54
56

Pet. GB
.607 -
.558 4
.548 5
.542 5V/
.535 6
.518 7Y
.488 10
.482 10V2
.386 19
.341 22%

LOUISVILLE M) - Watch for
a new Cassius Clay to emerge
wvithin a few months.
You will see him after Clay
goes into a training camp to pre-
pare for hist proposed fight with
heavyweight champion Sonny Lis-
ton.
"After eating all that raw meat
and chopping wood, I'll be a dif-
ferent man," Clay told the Louis-
ville KiWanis Club yesterday.
"You haven't seen the real Cas-
sius Clay yet."
Wants Fight in Philadelphia
Clay predicted that if the bout
is held in Philadelphia it will draw
150,000 fans. He hopes to fight
Liston on Sept. 30 if the cham-

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Los Angeles 1, New York 0
Philadelphia 10, San Francisco 2
Houston 2, Pittsburgh 0
Cincinnati 3, Chicago 1
(Only games scheduled)
TODAY'S GAMES
Los Angeles at New York (n)
San Francisco at Philadelphia (n)
Chicago at Cincinnati (2, t-n)
Milwaukee at t.sLouis (2, t-n)
Houston at.Pittsburgh (n)

* '-

Stop & Shop
at MORRILL'S
to take advantage
of our
PRE.I NVENTORY

pion gets by Floyd Patterson this
month.
"When I fight Liston, I'm going
to make 'em bounce the closed
circuit television off Telestar all
over the world. At $150 a seat all
around the world I should quit
talking? Ha,"
He admitted that Liston's "got
a little more reach, but my brains
will make up for that."
Someone asked if Clay didn't
think he's fighting Liston before
he's ready.
Me or Nobody
"If I'm not ready, name me a
man in the world who is," he re-
plied. "As for Patterson, if he
even dreamed he'd beat Liston,
he'd apologize."
Clay also called himself the
world's "best boxing promoter. I
did all the work on that Doug
Jones fight-the real promoter, he
didn't have to do a thing."
Meanwhile, in Miami, former
heavyweight champion Jack
Dempsey offered that Clay is no-
where near ready for a fight with
Liston.
"Liston is rugged, and this Clay
kid is not," Dempsey said.
No Experience
"I'd have to say Clay's biggest
drawback is his lack of exper-
ience. What's he had, 17 fights?
I had almost 200 fights before I
was ready for my first title bout.
"Clay is still a novice, but it's
not his fault. Money is the reason
managers and promoters push a
young kid into the slaughter pen
today.
"There's simply not enough
fighters around any more. In my
time, we had 15 to 20 sparring
partners, and they were good
punchers.
"They'd knock you down during
a sparring session and if you did
not get up, you knew you weren't
ready for a live-gate bout."

Cut High School Sports
if Tax Millage Fails
(EDITOR'S NOTE: While Phil Sutin spends most of the time editing the
news pages of The Daily, he is still a sports fan. Following The Daily's edi-
torial policy, the opinions are his alone.)
By PHIL SUTIN
Co-Evditor
The taxpayer has revolted against local school boards in south-
eastern Michigan, but area newspapers have not grasped its full sig-
nificance. Instead, they are carrying on a whining campaign to pre-
serve high school varsity sports-probably the most expendable ac-
tivity offered by the local school board.
. Detroit, Highland Park, Ann Arbor and Milan high schools have
beeir hit by funds shortages and in all cases the area papers have
pleaded, by inference, for high school sports when they really should
have been dropped or drastically curtailed.
In Highland Park, the board of education suspended varsity sports
for, at least a year as an economy measure. The Detroit News replied
.by running a weepy story about the demise of the great athletic tra-
dition at Highland Park. Basketball-Highland Park being a state
power in that sport--was particularly bemoaned. No more epic battles
with Grosse Pointe.
When the suggestions arose that Detroit eliminate interscholastic
sports, the News ran it lead on page one in big black type. The re-
sulting furor caused then school board president William D. Merrifield
to assure that "I don't think interscholastic sports will be eliminated.
We are going to have to make some savingsin the sports program but
we won't be able to decide what will be cut until we resolve the en-
tire budgetary problem."
j Kiddie Classes Cut
Detroit voters rejected a 12.8 mill tax increase, knocking out 7.5
existing mills. First, fourth and seventh grade students will only be
going to half-day classes next fall.
The Ann Arbor News also has been guilty of underhandedly foist-
ing expensive athletics on the citizenry. When the school board start-
ed to mull cuts in Ann Arbor varsity athletics, the News ran the same
type of dire stories its Detroit namesake did. It was even sadder about
out-county Milan where the voters' third rejection of a millage boost
seems to signal the end of long high school athletic tradition.
Athletics are probably the only high school frill.
They bring direct benefit to a small group of students and have
only a secondary entertainment value to the student body at large.
This would be acceptable if the skills derived were of an intellectual
nature. But in varsity athletics, intellectual ability is secondary to in-
nate physical prowess and trained coordination.
While football and basketball pay their own way, other sports do
not. The general public pays for varsity sports through subsidizing
lesser sports such as golf and by providing release time for coaches
so that they need not teach a full class load.
Ax Sports First
Because of its limited intellectual value, varsity high school sports
should be the first thing dropped when millage revenue gets cut. This
action would save thousands of dollars spent on equipment and travel
for use on preserving the intellectual caliber of the school and pro-
viding the best education possible for its students.
Physical education should not and need not be dropped. It is an
integral part of basic education and almost all students participate
and benefit by such physical development. It later provides a neces-
sary alternative to adult sedentary jobs and thus prolongs healthful
life.
But varsity sports are not necessary. It is about time the news-
papers stop inferring that they were.

.

FOR RENT
NEED AN APT. for the fall? We've got
all sizes, styles, and prices. Call 663-
0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till midnight.
C18
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clegn and
reasonable. Phone NO .2-2625. O
NEW 2 BDRM' APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Call
663-0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till mid-
night. 019
GIRL TO, SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 8.Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. 07
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacious newly
decorated apartment to sublet. 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.); NO 3-7268.
C11
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioning, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
C4

BIKES AND SCOOTERS
HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
Z2
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to college
students with which to buy life in-
surance. 25-35 married. 2 yrs. college
credit. No experience preferred. Write
Box 2, Michigan Daily. .1
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, media
cal, legal, technical conferences, mim-
eographing, off-set. Quick-Accurate-
Experienced.

it

Ann Arbor Professional Service
Associates 334 Catherine

I

CAMPUS APTS:
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS

RENT A CAR
$5.00/24 hr. day
Plus 5c per mile
For info call NO 5-3112
NORTH BROS.
LEASING INC.
3250 Washtenaw Ave.
(Inn America)

J2'

r

I

HOUSECLEANING
CLEARANCE on:
Household steel safes
Odd lots of colored mimeo

Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
1, 2, 3, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
FOXCROFT
APARTMENTS
South State near Hill. Designed and
furnished for 4, 5, or 6 student
occupants. '2 bedrooms each.
" Most spacious available
. Separate dining room
" Air conditioning
" Heat furnished
- Extra storgae space
Call Kelly Newton, 3-2260, eves. 2-0110
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RENT A TV THIS SUMMER
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