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July 09, 1963 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

v

THEICHIAN DILY

Students Take Part in Struggle for Civil Rights

CLAS SIFIEDS

tion by President John F. Ken-
nedy and the Supreme Court."
In line with USNSA's admoni-
tion to work for the Negro in the
North, the Northern Student
Movement h a s been tutoring
Negro children in slum areas in
places like New York, Trenton
and Philadelphia.
Show Opportunities
Recently a small group of Am-
herst C o 11 e g e undergraduates
undertook to inform high school
students from racial minorities
about opportunities for higher ed-
ucation.

The Amherst group, which calls
its program' Project Search has
spoken with students and guid-
ance counselors in Washington,
New York, Atlanta, Richmond,
St. Louis, Newark, Columbus,
Ohio, and Portland, Ore.
The turn toward the North will
be more pronounced as time goes
on, some students believe. As one
says: "In the South you can re-
move segregation laws and you've
won a fight. In the North there
are no segregation laws, out there
Is segregation."
Copyright, 1963, The New York Times

FOR RENT
NEED AN APT. for the fall? We've got
all sizes, styles, and prices. Call 663-
0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till midnight.
018
ATTRACTIVE-Furnished, 4-rooms and
bath. 2nd floor of duplex. Clean and
reasonable. Phone NO 2-2625. C
NEW 2 BDRM. APTS. for fall-Furn'd.,
carpeted, balconies. For 3 or 4. Call
663-0511 or 668-8723 9 a.m. till mid-
night. 019
GIRL TO SHARE campus-two bed-
room, nicely furnished. 721 S. Forest.
Call NO 2-9188. C2
BETWEEN hospitals and Rackham, ef-
ficiency with separate kitchen and
bath. Summer and fall. $75. NO 2-
0070. C7
SUMMER ONLY
Block from campus. Spacious newly
decorated apartment to sublet. 2
bedrooms, jalousied porch. $110/mo.
(another for $70/mo.) NO 3-7268.
C11'
HURON TOWERS APARTMENTS
2200 FULLER ROAD
One, two and three bedroom apts. Mod-
erate rentals include large rooms, air
conditioping, swimming pool, parking
and many other fine features. Low per
person cost for multiple occupants.
Call NO 3-0800 or stop by our rental
office, on premises, to see model apts.
04
CAMPUS APTS.
REDUCED
SUMMER RENTS
Remodeled and completely furn'd. for
1, 2, 3, 4 persons. $50-90/mo. Few still
available for fall. Single student only.
NO 5-9405.
USED CARS
'58 VW, Deluxe Sedan-Black with red
interior, sharp condition, radio. Only
$695. Call NO 2-8458. B8
TRIUMPH - TR-3, body and engine
excellent. $1275. Call NO 3-9176. N4
MUSICAL MDSE.,
RADIOS, REPAIRS
HI, FI, TV, RADIO, and PHONO SER-
VICE. TV rentals, speaker reconing.
Free pick-up and deliv'ersy service.
CAMPUS RADIO & TV, NO 5-6644,
325 E. Hoover. X
A-1 NEW AND USED INSTRUMENTS
BANJOS, GUITARS AND BONGOS
Rental Purchase Plan

MICHIGAN DAILY
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISII
RATES
LINES 1 DAY 3 DAYS 6 DA
2 .70 1.95 3.4
3 .85 2.40 4.2
4 1.00 2.85 4.9;
Figure 5 average words to a (i
Classified deadline, 3 P.M. d
Phone NO 2-4786
TRANSPORTATION

Drive Yourself . . .
ANI SAVE

pickups, panels, stakes
MOVING VANS

SIT-INS AND FREEDOM RIDES-Early student action against
discrimination was the sit-in in segregated lunch counters and the
freedom ride to desegregate interstate bus and train lines. The
Montgomery bus terminal luncheounter was one of the places de-
segregated during the freedom rides.
PHILANTHROPY:
Foundations Deterine
Directions 1n Education

1

(Continued from Page 1)
foundations with assets of $1 mil-
lion or more.
By far the largest is the Ford
Foundation, with $2.3 billion. Oth-
er big ones include the Rocke-
feller Foundation, $648 million;
Duke Endowment and the John
A. Hartford Foundation, each $414
million; Carnegie Corporation of
New York, $261 million, and W. K.
Kellogg Foundation, $215 million.
The 15,000 foundations disburse
more than $700 million in grants
each year, roughly half of it to
education.
Need Help
Certainly it is difficult to im-
agine what. American education
would be today without the help
of the foundations.
They have spurred development
of new high school courses in
physics, biology and mathematics.
They have spent millions to im-
prove the education of slum chil-
d ren. They have helped raise col-
lege faculty salaries, and increas-
ed the number of college teachers.
They have strengthened the jun-
ior colleges, improved teacher edu-
cation, and helped thousands of
youngsters go to college.
With $2.3 billion dollars to give
away, it is not surprising that the
Ford Foundation is held in the
greatest awe, and subject to the
most bitter attacks.
Prime Target
The Ford Foundation also has
been a prime target of Rep. Wright
Patman (D-Tex) who says the
foundations have reached "mas-
sive, undreamed of proportions."
Patman says it is time for an
"agonizing reappraisal" by Con-
gress on how to control them.
"We have no nefarious purpose,"
Ford Foundation President Henry
T. Heald rebutted.
"The Ford Foundation's objec-
tive in the field of education is the
improvement of American educa-
tion, carried out by American edu-
cators.
Support Experiments
"We support experimental proj-
ects which are designed and con-
ducted by educators. We do noth-
ing ourselves--and no one is un-

der any compulsion to engage in
these experiments, or to adopt
them.
But, say the critics, all too often
these experiments are only demon-
strations designed to "prove" an
already hardened opinion held by
the foundation.
As long ago as 1957, Frederick
M. Raubinger, New Jersey com-
missioner of education, declared,
"It seems to some of us that, in
some instances the announcement
of a grant for experimentation is
made simultaneously with the an-
nouncement of the results of the
experiment."
Difficult Rejection
But just as certainly, it is diffi-
cult for a hard-pressed school
board to turn down the money
pushed at them so enthusiastical-
ly by a big foundation.
A report from the American As-
sociation of School Administrators,
"Private Philanthropy and Public
Purposes," offered 30 guidelines
for administrators dealing with
foundations.
One said, "Boards of education
and trustees of state institutions
should not be unduly influenced
by foundation officials in the se-
lection or appointment of persons
to important educational posi-
tions."
One of the men involved in
drawing up the guidlines explain-
ed, "One of our members was in-
terviewed by the board of educa-
tion in a large eastern city when
the superintendent of schools
there moved on to another post.
Lost Interest
"He lost all interest in a possible
appointment when the chairman
of the board took him aside and
said he would have to promise
complete cooperation with the Ford
Foundation, which has some proj-
ects going in that city."
Another association official said
the president of a midwestern col-
lege had told him, "I have reason
to believe that the Ford Founda-
tion holds a veto power over the
appointment of the presidents of
at least half the private colleges
and universities in the United
States."
To all this, Heald stands on the
statements quoted heretofore.

Whit's Rent-A-Truck
VU 2-4434
50 Ecorse Road, Ypsilanti, Michigan
G
FOR SALE
HI FI-Garrard RC-88 changer, Picker
ing U-388T cartridge, Electro-Voic
12TRXB speaker in Argos enclosure
Knight 30 W Mono. integrated Amp
Pre-Amp. Will sell together or sepa
rately. Sacrifice. Leave message fo
Jim at NO 2-9890.
FOR SALE-Antique four-poster beC
Call HU 3-5973.
WANTED TO RENT
WOULD LIKE TO RENT a house c
apt from Jan 1-July 1, 1964, whil
attending the U of M as a Post-Doc
toral Fellow in College Administre
tion. Have three datighters. Ref
erences furn'd. Write, Robert J
Bohannon, 1015 N. Juliette, Man
hattan, Kansas.
PERSONAL
CHRIS DEAR,
You think you can't wait any long
er . . . it's been three weeks now tha
I've had that gincontrolable desir
and if we continue. like this I'd hat
to predict the outcome. Please hel
me and anyone else who also ma
have that urge.
Festeringly,
ye Fl
Question for the day
DO YOU KNOW WHO SUBSCRIBES
TO THE SUMMER MICHIGAN DAILY;
campus.)
Answer: The Daily staff members (i
addition to all other notable figures o
campus.)
Therefore, if You want ┬░to be known
as a notable, SUBSCRIBE now at $1.I
for the rest of the summer. Phon
2-3241.
DEAR DI,
Would you please clean up your roor
or I'll get the Wugs after you.
Truculently, who else? F
THE RESIDENTS of 706 E. Universit
proudly announce the birth at 4:1
a.m. July 5 of one pure white kitten
Write Box 105, Michigan Daily wit)
suggestions for kitten's name.
GUESS WHAT?
Jim Keson no longer bias a beard. Hoc
al-out that? Maybe he ought to glu
it on again. .I
IN RESPONSE to the "Kitten-Namin
Contest"-the following entries hav
been made:
1) Call her anything, but don't cal
her late for dinner. (Note: there
an assumption here that the "it"i
a she.)
2) Call her/him Puss-the cat i
"Puss and Boots" was white.
3) If she's a girl, call her "Kitt
Co-ed"-after all, she was born af
E. University St. (whatever that
supposed to mean.) ,
4) If you're one who likes oppc
sites, call it Blackie-that would b
hard to figure out.
5) Or call him/her "Guess." The
when people asked the cat's nam
just say "Guess" and you'll hav
more fun listening to their replies.
Incidently, we eagerly await furthe
responses so that we will be ableb
make reasonably objective choice.
chG
BIKES AND SCOOTERS

PAUL'S MUSICAL REPAI
119 W. Washington

H1FI & STEREO
HI Fl & STEREO
PICKUP & DELIVERY
SERVICE & REPAIRS

,IR
xi

THE MUSIC CENTER
NO 5-8607
NO 2-1335

Guaranteed Diamond Needles
$5.95
304S. THAYER ST.
13045S. UNIVERSITY

i

MISCELLANEOUS
LATE, LATE SNACKS?
RALPH'S MARKET
is open every night
till midnight!
ANYTHING YOUR LITTLE
STOMACH DESIRES
709 Packard J7

CAR SERVICE, ACCESSORIES '63 VESPA BS-1000 mi., luggage ra
crash bars, per. cond. NO 5-0869.

BONDED BRAKE LINING
$23.95 Fords, Chevys, some Plymouths.
Always a good price on new tires and
batteries.
HICKEY'S SERVICE STATION
Main at Catherine NO 8-7717
S1
FOREIGN CAR SERVICE
We service all makes and models
of Foreign and Sports Cars.
Lubrication $1.50
Nye Motor Sales
514 E. Washington
S2

HONDA of Ann Arbor
1906 Packard Road
665-9281
A Bike is a Necessity

Michigan's campus becomes
Accessible with a
BEAVER BIKE

REFERENCE

Save your feet and enjoy
summer rides through the Arb.
We Have EVERYTHING in
bike accessories.
Beaver Bike Shop
605 Church NO 5-6607
BUSINESS SERVICES
SALESMEN to make loans to -colleg
students with which to buy life in
surance. 25-35 married, 2 yrs. collei
credit. No experience preferred. Wri
Box 2, Michigan Daily.
665-8184
Manuscript typing, transcription, med
cal, legal, technical conferences, mim
eographing, off-set. Quick-Accurat
Experienced.
Ann Arbor Professional Service
Associates 334 Catherine

I,

I

All Subjects

BARGAIN CORNER .

SI BRANC NE

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