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July 09, 1963 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1963-07-09

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, JULY 9, 19

Undecided on Pitcher

O'Toole, unless knocked out of
the box, will hurl three innings,
the maximum permitted of any
pitcher. He is expected to be fol-
lowed by one of the four left-
handers on the NL squad, Sandy
Kouf ax, Warren Spahn, or Hal
Woodeshick. The right-handers
are Juan Marichal, Don Drysdale,
Larry Jackson and Ray Culp.
Houk said if Bunning is the
starter, he will pitch only two in-
nings because of his route-going
performance Sunday. The Yankee
skipper indicated the Tiger right-
hander would be followed by Mc-
Bride, Jim Bouton of the Yan-
kees, with Dick Radatz, Boston's
superb right-handed relief ace,
pitching at the windup. Other AL
pitchers include Bill Monbou-
quette, Jim Grant and Juan Pi-
zarro, the only southpaw on the

Ike Opens
Air Force
f 0
Golf Links
AIR FORCE ACADEMY, Colo.
(W) - Former President Dwight
Eisenhower drove two balls, the
first one which didn't suit him, to
dedicate a golf course in his honor
yesterday at the U.S. Air Force
Academy
The former President skied the
first ball off the first tee and a
spectator called out, "do you want
a Mulligan?" Eisenhower said,
"sure."
His second drive carried
straight down the fairway for
about 175 yards.
In his dedicatory remarks, Ei-
senhower said, "he was intrigued
by the chaplain's prayer."
The prayer concluded: ". .. be-
fore my days are done, I'd love
to make a hole in one."
Eisenhower said: "While I want
to make a hole in one, it is per-
haps better that I don't. as I can
always look forward to making
one."
He said the men who donated
funds for the $350,000 golf course
"did something the federal gov-
ernment couldi't do."
The course was financed entire-
ly by donations solicited by the
Air Force Academy Foundation.

WIMBLEDON, England (J') -
Margaret Smith, a 5-foot-10 Aus-
sie lass. who lifts weights in her
boudoir, demolished Billie Jean
Moffitt of Long Beach, Calif., yes-
terday in the rain-delayed wom-
en's singles final of the Wimble-
don Tennis Tournament, 6-3, 6-4.
Miss Smith was the first Aus-
tralian girl ever to win Wimble-
don, and her victory wrecked
American hopes for the first sweep
of the titles since 1955.
Chuck McKinley, the acrobatic
22-year-old from St. Louis and
San Antonio, Tex., took the men's
singles Friday in straight sets from
Fred Stolle of Australia.
Share Title
The United States had a share
in one other championship. Dar-
lene Hard of Long Beach, Calif.,
playing in what she says is her
last Wimbledon, teamed with Ma-
ria Bueno of Brazil for a victory
in women's doubles over Miss
Smith and Robyn Ebborn of Aus-
tralia, 8-6, 9-7.
The triumph thwarted Miss
Smith's bid for a women's triple
slam-singles, doubles and. mixed
doubles -- last achieved by Doris
Hart in 1951.
Miss Smith and Australia's Ken
Fletcher won the mixed doubles,
beating Miss Hard and Bob He-
witt of Australia, 11-9, 6-4.
Mexican Duo
Mexico captured its first full
Wimbledon championship when
Rafael Osuna and Antonio Pala-
fox overwhelmed Jean-Claude Bar-
clay and Pierre Darmon of France,
4-6, 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. The French
hadn't been in a Wimbledon final
since the days of Rene LaCoste,
Jean Borotra and Henri Cochet
back in the 1930's. Osuna shared
the 1960 men's doubles crown with
Dennis Ralston of Bakersfield,
Calif.
Billie Jean's bid fell short, she
said, because she didn't feel nerv-
ous enough.
"I tried to get keyed up for the
match," the bespectacled little
chatterbox-she talks to herself
all through a match-said, "but I
just couldn't feel any nerves at all.
And my game never got going."
No One Kicks Sand...
Miss Smith is a husky girl who
carries weights around the tennis
circuit and exercises with them in
COEDS:
It's Hairstyling
Galore!

her hotel room to build up her
strength.
Top-seeded for the tournament,
she quickly established her supe-
riority, rushing the net behind a
crunching serve and hitting pow-
erful drives from the backcourt
when Miss Moffitt -- four inches
shorter-was serving.
The victory avenged M is s
Smith's defeat by Billie Jean in
the first match last year, when
the Australian girl was also top-
seeded. Billie Jean was unseeded
both years.
This year, Miss Moffitt also
played a giant-killing role, knock-
ing off three seeded players on her
way to the finals.
Troubles
But she could not get her vol-
leys working with precision and
her passing shots were far off the
mark.
The postponement Saturday
seemed to take most of the ex-
citement out of the match, and the
center court crowd of about 12,-

WIMBLEDON WRA PUP:
Smith Wins Women's Title

Baseball Commissioner Ford
Frick noted that "Oakland is an
open territory. The American
League has the right to move
there if it wishes."

'Doc' Kearns Dies at 80;
Manager of Champions

MIAMI, Fla. ()-Jack Dempsey
and other boxing notables are ex-
pected to be pallbearers tomorrow
at the Miami burial of Jack
Kearns, colorful manager who
made Dempsey and many others
champions or headliners.
Kearns died in his sleep early
Sunday, six weeks short of his
81st birthday, still planning and
scheming in his grandiose fashion.
The family had been told Sat-
urday that he had only a day or
two more to live, but Jack scoffed
at the idea.
"He never gave up," said his
oldest son, Jack Jr., "he was talk-
ing before he went to bed Satur-
day night about going to Nevada
in a couple of days and getting
started on some of his projects."
Dempsey's Manager
Kearns piloted Dempsey to the
world's heavyweight championship
and managed him for many years,
until they separated in one of the
most famous feuds in sports.
In recent years the old wounds
between the "Manassa Mauler"
and his wily manager healed
somewhat and Dempsey still called
him "the greatest."
"We had a lot of laughs to-
gether and we made a lot of
money," Dempsey said. "He made
me champion."
In addition to Dempsey, Kearns
managed Mickey Walker, Archie
Moore, Joey Maxim, Jackie Fields,
Benny Leonard and Abe Atell-
all of them champions.
Champion Stable
"I had a piece of, or helped to
promote 18 or 20 champions all
told," Kearns once said. "I re-
gard my chief success, though, as
m a k i n g promoters -- and not
champions.
"I had the fighters and I had
to pick promoters to put them on.
I knew Tex Rickard from the
Alaska gold fields and I made him
a boxing promoter."
Rickard promoted, with Kearns'
help, the fight between Dempsey

and Georges Carpentier at Boyle's
30 Acres on July 2, 1921-box-
ing's first million-dollar gate that
drew $1,626,580.
A big spender and reveler for
most of his life, Kearns made and
tossed away several fortunes.
Money Handler
"He made 25 million and spent
most- of it," his son said. "Was
he wealthy? Well, I'd call him
wealthy - rich in many things.
Let's let it go at that."
Joe Sherman, a friend of
Kearns' for more than 40 years
and one of his pallbearers, called
him "the greatest hustler the
country has ever seen."
"He was what we called a
'rough hustler,'" Sherman said,
"and when I use the word 'hustler'
I'm not condemning him, I'm
praising him. He was a raconteur.
He mingled with the best. He
threw money away like a rank
sucker. He was a soft touch for
a handout."
Kearns, angular and with a
sharp, piercing voice, worked with
boundless energy and was always
ready to make a buck.

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The Dascola Barbers
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I

11

AMERICAN LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
New York 50 31 .617 -
Chicago 47 38 .553 5
Boston 44 37 .543 6
Minnesota 45 38 .542 6
Baltimore 47 40 .540 6
Cleveland 44 40 .524 7
Los Angeles 41 46 .471 12
Kansas City 36 46 .439 14%
Detroit 35 47 .427 15Y
Washington 30 56 .349 22
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
All Star Game at Cleveland, noon,
TV-Channel 4, Detroit.
NATIONAL LEAGUE
W L Pct. GB
Los Angeles 50 33 .602 -
San Francisco 48 37 .565 3
Chicago 45 37 .549 4
St. Louis 46 38 .548 4Y2
Cincinnati 45 40 .529 6
Milwaukee 43 40 .518 7
Pittsburgh 41 42 .494 9
Philadelphia 40 44 .476 10Y2
Houston 33 54 .379 19
New York 29 55 .345 21%
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled

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