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January 17, 1959 - Image 14

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-17
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


Equalization

Plan:

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Your Discontinued Textbooks

worth real mone!
if sold to ULRICH'S with your currently good ones.
YOUR BEST DEAL-FIGURE IT OUT
ULRICH'S sell your discontinued books to over
600 college bookstores. This way we get the

highest possible prices for you. At

least 25%

of the books used this semester are now obso-
lete or discontinued.
7 another ULRICH sere

(Continued from Preceding Page)
the only, extensive training pro-
gram for the Olympic athletes of
the United States. While other
countries subsidize their Olympic
training programs, the United
States leaves its athletes on their
own. The only ones that can af-
ford to train well, then, are those
that are on scholarship at the
colleges and universities.
AND, FINALLY, and probably
the most important aspect of
college athletes--or at least the
one that makes them the most
difficult to argue against-is the
fact that they entertain the public.
But whether the public wants
it or not, things are in need of
change on the college athletic
front.
Actually, a choice must be made,
and the alternatives are: amateur
or professional.
Either college athletics will have
to admit that they are operating
a professional system where every-
one gets paid, or else they will
have to clean it up and face more
rigid amateur standards.
To remain amateur is the ob-
vious choice, since the battle is
against going "big time." To admit
that college athletics are profes-
sional would be inviting trouble
in bigger "slush" funds, increased
help in "under the table" loans
and gifts and probably a greatly
increased circulation of betting
and bribery that have already
taken a toll at some institutions.
THE PROBLEM then, is how to
become more amateur, and
how to cut down on the "big time"
without ruining the public appeal
of college athletics,
Actually, it is quite simple, and
needs effort only in the centraliza-
tion and organization on a na-
tional level. What has to be done
is an extensive program of equali-
zation. All money matters must
be run on a rigid basis, where no
one school can offer any more--
money-wise-than another.

This is currently being attempt..
ed by the Big Ten and is working
quite well. The Conference has al-
ready tightened to the point where
some of the former powers have
fallen and some newcomers ap-
peared on top.
However, the rumors around the
league all say that the program
is failing because it is not being
enforced strictly. One hears fre-
quently of another school that has
slipped through some illegal aid.
Granted, these sort of rumors
multiply greatly, but they usually
do not start without some founda-
tion.
T HE LOGICAL solution lies with
a group that goes by the name
of the National Collegiate Athletic
Association. This organization has,
in the past, been almost powerless
to attempt anything that would
necessitate the enforcement that
this suggestion demands.
However, it is necessary that it
be done on this level. Part of the
trouble that the Big Ten has had
is the result of equal restrictions
not being in effect at neighboring
schools.
While Big Ten recruiters have
their hands tied by the Big Ten
Aid Plan, the schools in the Big
Seven have come into the basket-
ball states of Indiana and Illinois
and run off with the best boys.
This same story has been re-
peated in other sports, and some
Big Ten coaches have pointed out
that even the Ivy League is able
to offer an athlete more money
than the Big Ten is at present.
WHAT IS NEEDED, then, is a
universal aid plan, in which
every school in the country that
wants to compete in the NCAA is
allowed the same number of schol-
arships and the same amount of
money. This would be exactly the
same as the Big Ten operates
under now.
Schools that failed to abide by
this would be dropped from the
(Concluded on Next Page)

.

(Continued from Preceding Page)
coveries except by individual ef-
fort, and life in the college of
liberal arts must be organized in
such a way that the student is
continually thrust into situations
from which he must extricate him-
self by his own efforts.
I would like to say that learn-
ing does not thrive in the situa-
tion in which the students are on
one side facing a set of require-
ments, all the way from examina-
tions and grades based on them to
required texts, lectures and par-
ticular subjects, with the faculty
on the other, waiting with their'
criticisms to catch the man who
hasn't done his work, or who
hasn't read the right book, or-who
doesn't say what he is supposed
to.
In that situation, the intelli-
gence and animal cunning of the
student are used to beat the system
rather than to learn, and teaching
becomes a series of tiny punitive
actions which keep the student
constantly on his guard. He is
then unable to let himself go in
the enjoyment of reading which
he wants to do, reading which1
moves him into new insight or
captures him as he reads, or tells -
him something which he wants to
know and needs to know in order;
to accomplish something important
to him.
Most good students can beat
any system the educators put in
front of them, and the best stu-
dent, the one we used to admire
when I was in college, was the man
who could beat the system with no.
apparent effort, who was so clever
at it and showed so much style
and grace under stress, that no
one would have believed that he'
had ever opened a book, attended
a class or listened to a word that
was said.
It is therefore very important,'
In my judgement, to change ,the
system so that it is one which you
cannot beat, because there is'
nothing to beat except oneself, a
system which does not align the
forces in opposite camps, but
which joins together the teacher
and the student in a common en-
deavor to gain some insight into
truth and knowledge.

WHERE ARE WE then in the
search for achieving liberal-
ism? What is the future of liberal-
,ism and the liberal arts?
If what has been said about...
liberalism has any truth in it, one
answer is clear. The essence of the
liberal movement lies in its con-
cern for human values as against
material, political and money
values.
We who are teachers must teach
passionately the faith we hold in
the possibilities of man. There are
enough who tell us of the faults
of man, his inconstancy, his weak-
ness, his indecision, his ignorance.
That side is already adequately
handled.
We must say to all who will
listen that this is not an ordinary
period in American history. It is
the first time in the history of
civilization that one country has
ever had the chance of leading
the whole world in creative and
democratic experiments in social
planning. It is the first time in
history that any country has had
the means, both in material wealth
and in social structure to give to
every child born an opportunity
for education up to the height of
his powers.
It is the first time that any
country has had the economic
strength to wipe out entirely the
slums, and with them the bad
human relations, the juvenile de-
linquency and the evils of sub-
urban and urban congestion. It
is the first time that it has been
possible for the entire resources of
Western culture-its music, poetry,
drama, literature, ballet, art ob-
jects-to be brought to a whole
population through television, mo-
tion pictures, radio and the mass
magazines.
WE IN.AMERICA are at the be-
ginning of what amounts to a
cultural revolution made possible
by science and education, moving
in an incredibly short time from
education and culture for the few
to universal education and a high
level of mass culture for a total
population.
With the flood of new talent
which will be forthcoming from
the millions more who will be in
our schools and colleges, with the

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ABOVE is a carefree Sierra Dot cotton broad-
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SATURDAY, JANUARY 17

MAIN SHOP
on Forest off
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CAMPUS TOGS
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2

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