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January 06, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 6,1959 THE MICHIGiAN DAILY

.... .

New Parking Ordinances
Approved by Zomng Board

By JOHN RICKELk
At a meeting on Dec. 29, the
Ann Arbor Zoning Board passed a
new off-street parking ordinance.
The new law requires increases
in the amount of parking space,
provided by various landowners
according to Graham Conger of
Honor Group
To Iuitiate
Eight University faculty mem-
bers and 243 students will be ini-
tiated into Phi Kappa Phi schol-
astic honor society at 8 pn. to-
morrow in Rackham Amphithea-
tre.
Featured speaker at the initia-i
tion ceremony will be Dean Roger
W. Heyns of the literary college.
His topic will be "The Proper Cli-
mate for Scholarship."
Prof, J. Philip Wernette of the
business administration school
Will preside at the ceremonies. ini-1
tiates will be presented by Dean
Fedele Fauri of the social work
school, vice-president of the local
chapter.
The new members include grad-
uate and undergraduate students
from 16 of the University's schools
and colleges. Five are seniors at
Flint College, the first to be ini-
tiated from Flint.
New faculty members of the so-
;iety will be Prof. Paul J. Alex-
ander of the history department,
Dean Stephen S. Attwood of the
engineering college, Dean Kenneth
E. Boulding of the economics de-
partment and Prof. Stuart W;
Churchill of the chemical engi-
neering department.
Also to be initiated are Prof.
E. Lowell Kelly, chairman of the
psychology department; Prof.
Rensis Likert, director of the In-
stitute for Social Research; Prof.
Cilbert Ross of the music school
and Prof. William B. Willcox, act-
ing chairman of the, history de-
partment.

the University Investment Office
and secretary of the Alumni Inter-
Fraternity Council.
The law affects both businesses
and fraternities, Conger said, but
since the law applies only when
expansion or additions are under-
taken, businesses will probably be
the first to notice its effects.
Parking Space Required
Under the old zoning laws, fra-
terities were required to have one
parking gace for every six beds
in the building, while the new law
requires one parking space for
every five beds in undergraduate
fraternities and one off-street
parking space per three beds in
professional fraternities. Sororities
are required to have one parking
space for every six beds.
Mr. Conger said that there was
less opposition to the change than
one might have expected,
May Seek Exceptions
He said zoning laws, once made,
are extremely difficult to have
changed. Some groups, he said,
like professional fraternities, ex-
pected .to be hardest hit by the
new ruling, may try to get excep-
tions made by contacting the Zon-
ing Board ofhAppeals.
"Since there are few driving
permits issued to undergrads, and
there are a proportionally small
number of seniors in the fraternity
houses," Conger continued, "only
about six of the undergraduate
fraternity houses are likely to have
any trouble complying with the
law in case of expansion."
Land at Premium
Assistant Dean of Men William
Cross stated that "any groups con-
templating major changes will be
hardest hit" and he further noted
that "the situation is not likely
to become easier as more people
come to campus. The difficulty in
conforming to the parking ordi-
nances is that land, especially in
the campus area, is at such a
premium."
Cross suggested that "the North
Campus area will greatly help to
solve this land problem if a fra-
ternity development ever occurs
there."

'U' Receives
$480,000
NSF Grant
The University has received a
grant from the National Science
Foundation to conduct an experi-
mental summer institute program
in science and mathematics.
Part of the $480,000 grant shall
be used for stipends to elementary
supervisors and teachers who will
use the institutes this summer.
Prof. Joseph N. Payne of the
education school, has been chosen
to direct the summer institute in
arithmetic at the University..
'The Institutes will offer courses
and activities especially designed
to meet the needs of elementary
school supervisors and teachers in
presenting science and mathemat-
ics courses," said Alan T. Water-
man, NSF director.
"Supervisors and teachers will
be given opportunity to learn
about recent advances in science,
to update their earlier training in
science and mathematics, and to
study fields in which their train-
ing is lacking or inadequate."

Former Professor of Medicine Dies
Dr. Herman H. Riecker, former,
many cases of rheumatic fever Dr. Riecker was a member of
associate professor of internal wr o en igoe ssc.
medicinet he Univ , ied ere not being dianosed as such, the American College of Physi-
Suday ate a brieilned Serves as Chairman cians, Diploniate of the Board of
Sunday after a brief illness at He had sered as chairman of
He hd srve ascharma ofInternal Mfedicin~e, past president
St. Joseph Mercy Hospital where the committee, which supports
he had been practicing medicine projects to train doctors to recog- of the Washtenaw County Medical
since 1942. nize the disease, organize diag- Society and member of the Michi-
since . ~~~nostic centers and provide care, gnHatAscain
Dr. Riecker, 63 years old, was1- gan Heart Assciation.
born in Pennsville. O.. and earned
his AB degree at Marietta College
in 1917. He received his MD degree
from Johns Hopkins University in
1923.
Instructor at 'U.
He became an instructor in in-
ternal medicine at the University
in 1926, later becoming an as- \
sistant and, in 1935, an associate
professor. He resigned from the
medical school staff in 1942 but \
continued to work with the Uni-
versity's post-graduate medicine
department until 1947.
Instrumental in the establish-
ment in 1944 of the Rheumatic
Fever Control Committee of the
Michigan State Medical Society,
Dr. Riecker had said he considered \
the program essential to bring the
disease to the attention of doctors.
Surveys at the time indicated that \\

Slavic Language Department
To Offer Three New Courses
A special Russian reading course
and two literature courses of cur- quence if they plan to enter gradu-
rent interest will be open to non- ate school in the fall, he said.
concentrates for the spring semes- Russian 124 deals with Soviet
ter, according to Prof. Deming literature, for which no reading
Brown, chairman of the Slavic knowledge of Russian is required,
languages and literatures depart- Boris Pasternak's Nobel Prize
ment. novel, Dr. Zhivago, will be studied
For the first time, Russian 11, in detail.
the reading class, is being offered Of interest to -students of com-
in the spring. The course is de- parative literature and others are
signed for non-concentrates who English readings and lectures on
desire to attain a reading knowl- Dostoevsky, Russian 156. Discus-
edge of Russian for their special sion evolves around Dostoevsky's
fields in a short time. major works with stress on their
A two-semester sequence with relationship to Western European
Russian 12 is advised. The latter literatures.
course will be offered in the fall
next year to provide a full se-.
quence for students starting now.
Interested second semester sen- g
iors may continue with the se-

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It's Your Chance to Save up to 50% and More of Your Christmas Gift Money

530 S. Forest Ave.
Between S. U. and Washtenaw
Parking in Rear

CAMPUS TOGGERY
1111 S. U. near E. U.

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BUSINESS HOURS:
9:30-5:30 Monday-Saturday

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STUDENTS . . . because of vacation we extend
to you the privilege of exchanging Christmas

merchandise to January

10. No cash refunds

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