100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1958 - Image 11

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-23
Note:
This is a tabloid page

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


_ t

German Education

I

Education

Without a

Harnes

(Continued from Preceding Page)
repulsion of Russia and the east-
ern countries which it influences,
like the reaction to the nighty
challenge of American civilization,
are contested ground. Indeed, the
whole of German cultural life

partment included not only the
liberal arts such as philosophy,
languages and history, but also
mathematics and natural sciences.
Nowadays, the latter two form
separate departments, and the law
school grew .to become a depart-
ment of law, economics and politi-

In Germany, the Student Is Allowed To Guide His Own LE

By ERHARD LIPPMANN

i t VS i , L . L V 'l . , U i V
bristles with problems to which ;ai science. Agriculture, forestry,
there are as yet few signs of a dentistry veterinary science, and
permanent solution. en-inorLing for which independent
The. German universities, until Hochschulen had been founded
the beginning of the 20th century, towards the end of the 19th cen-
consisted of four departments: tury were consequently absorbed
theology, law, medicine, and phi- in the framework of the univer-
losophy. The philosophical de- sities.
The (.OLiEN AI'LES
Itestaurant...
features for your enjoyment
CHICKEN . STEAK . SEAFOOD'
SMORGASBORD

SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH knows
no national boundaries. It de-
velops in all civilized countries
according to the same laws, and
its findings become the common
property of all mankind.
The work accomplished in the
detached atmosphere of the in-
stitutions of higher education
establishes a spiritual tie between
all who are dedicated to it with
both soberness and passionate
devotion.
The term "science," as used in
Germany, embraces both research
and teaching I. e. the search fox
new fields of experimentation and

DEMONSTRATION-Members of the Communist Youth Organization of the East Berlin University
march on Marx-Engels Plaza (Shelled street sign still bears the old name). Banners in foreground
bear slogans like "The capital of Germany-meeting place of the united German youth," Placard
in background shows boss of East German Communists, Walter Ulbricht.

also BUFFET LUNCHEONS 11 A.M. - 2 P.M.
ALL YOU CAN EAT for $1.00

Erhard Lippnain, a former
exchange student here from the
Free University of Berlin in
Germany, knows both the Soviet
and West German sys/ems of
education having studied under
both. He contribu/td an article
on German fraternities to The
Michigan Daily Magazine last
spring. Mr. Lippmann returned
to Germnany last week.

,i

I

TOWER HOTEL
NO 2-4531 300 South Th

ayer

"^""° i

THE FINEST
.IN
DINING!

!, ,}.
L.l '
,
1

* PRIME STEAKS
TURKEY & CHICKEN
* SEA FOOD
BANQUET HALL AVAILABLE
for all your Group Needs
Large Parties or Small Gatherings Welcomed
"Serl ing Ann Arbor students and residents
for more than one-half centur)."
PREKETES SUGAR BOWL

THE OBJECTIVE of instruction
at the universities is not onlys
to impart a high degree of knowl-
edge in the various spheres of1
learning, but also to-bring the stu-
dents into close contact with sci-
entific problems with a purpose
to harmonizing theoretical knowl-
edge with actual research.
They are thus taught to form
their own judgment and to carry
out independent scientific re-
search. Similar to the American
system, the instruction is divided
into lectures, exercises, seminars
and practical work. In his lec-
tures, the teacherpresents to the
student the scientific material in
question within specified bound-
aries; in the exercises, teachers
and students work together on
some practical problem related to
the lecture material. The seminars
provide an opportunity for selected
advanced students to do original
research, while practical work,
especially in the natural sciences
and medicine, serves as an in-
troduction to laboratory and clini-
cal work.
HE IDEA and the purpose of1
acEmi freedom are to train'
the student to make independent,
decisions to his own responsibility.
His attendence at the lectures
is never checked as in some other
countries. All that is required of
him is that, when taking an oral
examination at the end of the
scholastic year, midterm-exami-
nations or degree examinations, he
must give proof of a high stand-
ard of knowledge, performance,
and scientific appreciation.

The manner in which he
achieves that standard is in his
own hands. He is completely free
to
a) select the university ac-
cording to his own wishes and
to change it whenever he de-
sires,
b) to attend lectures at his
own discretion,
c) to decide on the date of
his final examinations, after
having completed the mini-
mum number of semesters as
specified in the examination
regulations,
d) to select his lectures and
professors.
This principle of freedom, be-
sides awakening the student's in-
tellectual faculties, inculcates in
him the strength of will and
character which are essential to
the academic man,
THE INTELLECTUAL develop-
ment in East Germany has,
followed different principles.
The ruling regime, like that of
the Soviet Union itself, uses all
means at its disposal to turn the
students into "human beings of
a new type." Science of the new
type, too, is abandoning Western
traditions and renouncing the
despised "objectivism of bour-
geois science."
Scientific effort is no longer
devoted to ascertaining the truth.
The task of science has now be-
come that of proving and spread-
ing the dogmas and conceptions
of Marxism - Leninism on party
lines, in the course of both teach-
ing and research.
The natural sciences which in
Soviet phraseology are concerned
with "representing matter in the
course of evolution" are guided in
so far as a philosophic starting
point is concerned by Communist
ideology, which also supplies the
key to their problems.

To the social sciences (all
spheres of the arts and sociology)
the special task has been assigned
of interpreting those teachings of
Marxism - Leninism which noW
rank as science. An extensive ap-
paratus of supervision watches
over the ideological fidelity of a
particular science to the party
line and simultaneously sees to
it that the plans of the state are
fulfilled.
THE UNIVERSITY system in
East Germany is close to the
Soviet model, and all students are
obliged to carry out a "sociological
basic study" in Marxism-Leninism
and dialectic and historical ma-
rialism. The notion of genuine
education in the sense of a "stu-
dium generale" is being abandoned
in favor of specialized studies.
Instead of the traditional divi-
sion of the scholastic year in se-
mesters, there is only one, lasting
for ten months, with extensive
drill and supervision in the form
of collective learning by heart of
prescribedhtheses.
The children of workers and
peasants and of members of the
party are given preference in the
matter of studies. The "advanced
intelligentsia" which the regime
is producing in its universities is
intended to replace at the earliest
possible moment the bourgeois
specialists who cannot at present
be spared.
However, most of these East
German students are enduring
their fate in embittered frustra-
tion-many in a frame of mind of
increasing resignation or even
despair-yet all in the unshakable
belief that the hour of reunion and
revenge will strike.
Thus, the puzzling fate of Ger-
many, torn between ascendency
and despair and ripped into three
hermetically closed parts, is also
demonstrated by its current two
systems of higher education.

Y

? ti' .',*.' +", .'fi f ?s :;ref,:a?:t:rxfistfir;.:t,..,.., +x.. v,:.. .,scx. rr..,"mr .".>-r ...st. . r . .x.x n xsrfi:.::axfis".".¢

- s -r-. a Yi P . " - s - .-6 - ---t-- - -- - ---
(he Clk44,ic. la' gl&ue
,*
f-f-
Close felted Deep Blue woolen flannel ir
single-breasted notch lapel and 3-button coo
patchand flo ockets---enter vent-and s
In addition this ever popular knockabout jac
in our Piedmont model featuring lapped sea
-and plain flap pockets. Also available in
and Olive.

Students Carry Out Research on Model Birds at Bonn University

109-111 S. Main Street

NO 2-1414

i -

to put you in sharp focus...
PRESCRIPTION LENSES

IN

C

AMPUS

STYLES

Men's 100% Wool
Flannel Trousers
$395
(regular $12.95 value)

Also-Lenses and Frames Repaired
Barnes-Hind Contact Lens Wetting Fluid

Inner yard of the University of Marburg
Have you been down to the little
Arts and Crafts Shop at 209 S. State
below Bob Marshall's Book Shop ?
featurin g
ARTS AND CRAFTS, MOSAICS and JEWELRY of all kinds --
very unusual gifts to take home to your loved ones
for the Thanksgiving Holiday.

Q
0

Ivy League or Regular Styles
Assorted Colors
Free Cuff Alterations

c1tf;e1

ItET
4Rg0R(

CAMPUS

OPTICIANS

p

BRITISH IMPORTS

240 NICKELS ARCADE

SAM'S STORE
122 E. Washington St.
Sam J. Benjamin, '29 Lit., owner

TAILORS

CLOTHIERS

- LAKE DESIGNS -
209 S. State St. - Below Bob Marshall's Book Shop

COME DOWN AND BROWSE

,

. _... 1 119 3SOUTH UNIVERSITY#{
~~i1~t tj t A& i~ tA &AAA AAA * a A .

fr
., .y.

U

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan