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November 22, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THlE ICHIGA N DAILY

tEFERS CAMPUS CONCERTS:
Seeger Likes Audiences To Sing Along

Union, ISA To Present
World's Fair Today

By THOMAS TURNER
Pete Seeger's current tour with
Sonny Terry is his "best ever,"
Seeger said following Thursday'
night's concert.
Eighty per cent of the concerts
are on college campuses, the lanky
folk-singer explained, and he pre-
fers audiences which sing along
to those in night clubs where he
has to "compete with whisky for'
attention."
Outside the dressing room door
some fans, unsated by the two
and one-half hour concert and {
the autograph signing which fol-
lowed, shuffled around and knocked
to get in and talk to Seeger again.j
"If I encourage them now they'll
stick around another half hour
and I'll never be able to get out
of here tonight," Seeger apolo-
gized. He was going to sing at1
Princeton last night, he explained,
and had to be in Philadelphia by
noon yesterday.
Likes Student Singers
Seeger mentioned another fac-
tor in the success of his college
concerts, a. "solid nucleus" of stu-
dents who know the songs he likes
to sing.

as the result of a "history-making
decision in the field of civil rights,'
Seeger declared.
The court decided the auditor-
lum was public and could be hired
to anyone, he explained.
Terry and Burris are Negroes
while Seeger has been accused of
leftist political sympathies.
Seeger, who seasons each con-
cert with songs of "protest" as well
as songs "just for fun," had
brought gales of laughter from his
Hill Auditorium audience with a
hybrid of the two, a ditty dealing
with production speedups set to
the tune of the Battle Hymn of
the Republic.
Some Refuse To Play Songs
There are still a few radio sta-
tions which have little inter-staff
memos which .say "Don't play
Seeger," he said after the concert,
but "not very, many people pay
much attention to this sort of
thing anymore.'
"One thing "I've been dying to
know," a studen't asked Seeger a"
he prepared to leave, "is where you
get all those African songs."
"Some I've learned from books,"
the tall artist admitted, but others'
come from African students study-
ing in this country.
Sings African Songs
"Everybody Loves Saturday
Night" is a popular song in Sierra
Leone on the coast where the
people speak both English and a
native language," he illustrated.
"A friend of mine heard it at a
show in California given by some
African students, and he taught
it to me."
"You probably have African stu-
dents here who could teach you
some songs," he pointed out.
Then Seeger left, stopping to
explain to a female admirer that
he was sorry, but he wouldn't be
around at all in the morning.
And a student with a beard
proudly displayed his guitar, on
the back of which he had collected
Seeger's autograph.

k!
!
s
Y
r
a
}
R
r
r
r
1

PETE SEEGER
... sings folk songs
"Everywhere I go I meet kids

BendixPlans
Construction
Construction on an addition to
the Ann Arbor Bendix Systems
Division plant to be used for re-
search will begin about Feb. 1,
William N. MacDonald, the com-
pany's executive engineer, dis-
closed Thursday.
The research teams, totalling
500 researchers and personnel, to
occupy the new building will in-
clude the guidance and control
group, communications, nuclear
group and data processing.
Also housed in the new quarters
will be digital and analog com-
puter facilities to be used in re-
search programs and a semi-hot
storage vault for radioactive ma-
teriala-
Some of the research programs
being carried on by Bendix in-
volve the study of electronic prop-
erti a of semi-conducting ma-
terials in the field of solid state
physics and research In problems
associated with the aircraft indus-
try.
The programs are set up to In-
vestigate low temperature phe-
nomena, thermoelectric effects,
methods of forming electrical
Junctions and effects of material
Impurities.
Products of the research and
development program have re-,
suited In the manufacture and
distribution by the company of a
large group of gemanium and sil-
con power and amplification tran-
s iss which are small and reli-
able enough to meet the require-
ments of advanced electronic cir-
cuitry.
Bendix also does a large volume
of research and production in as-
sociation with the aircraft Indus-
try.
The division began research on
missile guidance in 1946. Since
then it has designed numerous
components and sub-systems for
reciprocating engines and pro-
duced the ramet missile engine
used in Jet engines and rocket
motors.
Board Votes
To Promote
Area Survey
The civic affairs committee of
the Ypsilanti Board of Commerce
encouraged the undertaking of an
urban re-development survey of
the entire Ypsilanti area at its
meeting Thursday evening.
After studying Saginaw's area
re-development plan, 'the com-
mitteee voted to recommend to the
directors of the Board of Com-
merce that a similar program be
undertaken in Ypsilanti in cooper-
ation with a field extension service
of Michigan State University.,
The committee also adopted four
additional projects to be empha-
sized during the next six months.
These include possible revision of
the City Charter; possible changes
in the zoning ordinances; a study
to determine the adequacy of the
city park, Forestry and Recreation1
Departments setup; and a city
beautification program.

who met me Y at summer ycaips
years ago," he said. And despite
the comparative small sales of his
records, by popular disk standards,
many know the songs he has re-
corded solo or as tenor with The
Weavers.
He has left behind a pile of
request lists on the edge of the
stage as evidence of the common
stock of folk-music shared by the
audience and the artist.
Seeger explained that his next
performance in Michigan, with
mouth-organist Terry and his
nephew, J. C. Burris, who was at
that moment in the next room
demonstrating his technique with
the bones to a delighted knot of
students, would be a Detroit con-
cert Nov. 30.
They would be singing In De-
troit's Institute of Art auditorium

-Daily-william Kimball
BRUSSELS IN ANN ARBOR-An Arabian student puts up a
poster at his country's exhibit for the World's Fair. The Fair, an
annual University event, is sponsored by the Union and the
Internation Students Association. It features displays of the na-
tional arts and handicraft of the various nations represented on
campus. In the evening there will be a talent show with partici-
pants from eleven countries. The Fair will be held at the Union
from 1 p.m. today to 1 a.m. Sunday.
College Roundu

CHAIN OF EXISTENCE?
International Student Defines
Hindu Idea of Reincarnation

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
Reincarnation is a continuous
chain of the existence of the soul
from one bondage to another sub-
Ject to time and space, according
to P. Krishnamurthy, Grad.
Krishnamurthy,y'president of
the International Students' Asso-
ciation, led an informal discussion
on "The Hindu Idea of Reincar-
nation" yesterday in the Lane Hall
Library.
Religion in India, his native
country, is not Just confined to
Hinduism, he said, Rather, there
are a vast variety of religions and
also a" variety of cults of the Hin-
du religion, each of which is based
on a different philosophy, he ex-
plained.
Cults Based on Books
All cults of Hinduism center
their authority on a set of books.
These books include the philo-
sophy known as reincarnation, or
the realization of man's desire to
perpetuate himself - to be im-
mortal, he- said.
"The religion of Egypt believes
that the body is a duplicate of the
soul. After a person's death, the
preserving of the physical frame
is very important because they
(the Egyptians) have the concept
that through some medium the
body reappears," Krishnamurthy
explained.
In contrast, he continued, the
bodies of the dead in India are
generally cremated. Hindus realize
that the physical frame will de-
cay anyway and that there is no
use to pretend that anything,
further will happen, he said.
Describes Irrational Person
"The most irrational person is
one who completely identifies
himself with his body. The most
rational, God-conscious person
has succeeded in realizing that
the soul is not the body but part
of the internal conscious existence
which is called God," the Indian
student pointed out.
"If God is fair to all the souls
le has created and if this exis-
tence is the only one we have in
this physical frame, then the
question arises: Why do some per-
sons undergo suffering for no ap-
parent reasons?" Krishnamurthy
questioned.
Part of the "original sin" con-

I'
cept can be used as an explana-
tion, he said. But if suffering is
the reward for sin, he continued,
then this suffering is the result
of sin in some pre-existence. He
cited an example of the person
who has committed murder who
is given some punishment in this
very existence by his fellow man
and presumably some later on by
God.
Soul Reincarnated
"'This chain of cause and effect
is what keeps the soul going from
one physical existence to anoth-
er," he said.
Rather than blaming God for
suffering, he pointed out, an in-
dividual should just accept it as a
reward for the sins of a past life.
While- suffering for the past,
Krishnamurthy added, man can
prepare for a future life by pres-
ently leading a good life.
In answerto a question from a
member of the' audience on proof
of reincarnation, Krishnamurthy
replied that Hindus believe ex-
periences of past lives are pres-
ently being put into a "bank."
Explains Lack of Knowledge
"We do not know, for all prac-
tical purposes, . what we ate for
dinner, much less what we did in
a past life," he said. "However,,
some people can recollect by a
very good use of discipline what
their past experience was."
In north India a child, eight
years old, started repeating from
memory the texts which give basis
to the Hindu religion, according
to a newspaper report. His parexits
were amazed as he later recount-
ed his entire past life for them,
Krishnamurthy said.
"It is not that the soul does
not know of its past lives but that
the mind cannot remember," he
said.

By KENNETH MCELDOWNEY
CAMBRIDGE, Mass.-Richard
Spector, officer of the Harvard-
Radcliffe Rocket Society, com-
plains that they are unable to ob-
tain any facutly members as spon-
sors.
He claimed that the faculty
won't have anything to do with
them if they actually plan to fire
rockets.
Members of the faculty main-
taln that they would sponsor the
club if it was more interested in
serious study of rocketry.
Spector said they were being
treated as if "they were a bunch
of high school students playing
with fireworks."
PHILADELPHIA, Pa. -- Later
this month a conference of south-
ern student leaders will be held
at Pfeifer College in Misenheimer,
North Carolina to discuss racial
tensions in the South.
A total of 150 students, both
white and Negro, will represent
nearly 70 institutions which are
both segregated and integrated.
This conference will discuss is-
sues dealing with such topics as
"What Are the Basic Issues in
the South Today?"
* * *
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. -- Because
of a lack of meeting space for
combined Harvard-Radcliffe stu-
dent organizations certain mem-
bers of both the faculty and stu-
dent body are attempting to have
a Student Activity Center con-
structed to relieve the difficulties
caused.
At the present time many stu-
dent groups of both schools are
forced to meet in classrooms and
in cafeterias.
LOS ANGELES, Calif. - At 10
a.m. last week the chimes at
UCLA rang out playing two school
songs.
Professors were asked to allow

their students to spend the first
ten minutes of class singing along
with the chimes.
The bell ringing was sponsored
by all the spirit organizations on
the UCLA campus to build up
spirit for their football game on
Saturday, according to one cam-
pus leader.
KALAMAZOO, Mich. - Last
week Western Michigan Univer-
sity hosted the regional Associa-
tion of College Unions conference.
The conference was held in or-
der to get leaders together from
different campuses to exchange
ideas and develop leadership qua-
lity, the Western Herald said.
COLUMBUS, Ohio - Dr. Ralph
W. Stacy, associate professor at
Ohio State University, says he has
invented a computer that will al-
low physicians to make early diag-
noses of such diseases as harden-
ing of the arteries and high blood
pressure.
* s *
MINNEAPOLIS, Minn. - The
Student Council of Religions at
the University of Minnesota re-
cently objected to sex and liquor
in Minnesota's campus magazine,
the "Ivory Tower."
The Council said that they
thought the stories could be
handled without resorting to sen-
sationalism.

TRIGON FRATERNITY
proudly announces
the birth of quintuplets
to their most esteemed mascot
Schatzlein von Goldstein
on November 19, 1958

i

PHOTOGRAPHY
by Bud-Mor
NO 2-6362
1103 South University

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Metropolitan Opera Basso

MON.,Nov. 24, 8:30
in Hill Auditorium

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