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November 16, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY MEETING:
Regents Accept Gifts
Totaling $232,000
The University Regents accepted
gifts, grants and bequests totaling a graduate fellowship in phar-t
$231,851.18 at their meeting yes- macy.f
terday. The Genesee County Unit andt
The Rockefeller F o u n d a t i o n the Newaygo County Unit of thec
gave the largest grant, up to American Cancer Society gavec

'First Lady of the World' To Give Talk
At 'U' Tuesday for International Week

115" V -, WI%, A" 5 QV bA-.A , " v

$150,000, for research on the the-
ory of consumer behavior under,
the Economic Behavior Program!
of the Survey Research Center.'
The research, which will beginI
Feb. 1, 1959, will cover a four-year1
period.
The Regents accepted $12,500
from Lilly Endowment, Inc., for

i

Organization
Notices

]

-- - I

Gamma Delta, Lutheran Stud. Club
Supper & Program, Nov. 16, 6 p.m.
Lutheran Stud. Center, 1511 Washtenaw.
Speaker': Rev. W. Britton, Lawrence,
Kansas, "Jesus Christ-Practicing Psy-
chologist."
Graduate Outing Club, Hiking and:
Supper, Nov. 16, 2 p.m., Meet in back
of Rackham Bldg. (N.W. Entrance).
Italian Club, Weekly Coffee Hour,
Nov. 18, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. All
4tudents interested in things Italian
are invited to attend.
s . .
Lutheran Student Assoc., Supper-6
p.m. followed by speaker Dr. G. Farrell,
Nov. 16, Lutheran Student Center, For-
est & Hill.
* * *
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Nov. 16
4 p.m., Lane Hall. Speaker: Dr. K. Pike
U. of M. Prof. of Anthro., "Sin, Myth
or Master?"
"* s
Russian Circle, Slides of Russia by
Miss Green, Nov. 17, 8 p.m., Lane Hall,
2nd Floor Aud.
SGC Public Relations Comm., Com-
mittee Meeting, Nov. 18, 4 p.m., 154
SAB. Interested students welcome.
: s *
Unitarian Student Group, Meeting,
Nov. 16, 7 p.m., Unitarian Church.
Speaker: Dr. Wolcott, Educ. Dept.,
"Progressive Education."
University Figure Skating Club, Or-
ganizational Meeting, Nov. 18, 7 p.m.,
WAB Lounge.
*s R s
Eastern Orthodox Stud. Soc., Nov. 18,
8 p.m., 207 Tappan Hall. Speaker: Dr.
0. Grabar, Assist. Prof. Dept. of Fine
Arts, "A Byzantine Church, Its Art
and Architecture." Lecture will be 11-
lustrated.
a w s
Congregational-Disciples Guild, Nov.
16, 7 p.m., Congregational Church. Film:
"A Measure of the Moment."
Congregational-Disciples Guild, Grad-
uate Group, play reading: T. S. Elliot's
"The Cocktail Party," Nov. 11, 8 p.m.
Guild House.

.,

$11,000 and $500 respectively and
miscellaneous donors added $40
for the University Cancer Re-
search Institute.
General M o t o r s Corporation
gave $8,850 fo rthe General Mo-
tors Corporation college scholar-
ship fund.
The Regents accepted $5.500
from the Netherlands Trading So-
ciety as the share of the Nether-
lands Ministry of Education to-
wards the salary of Prof. Geert
Wielenga.
Esso Gives Funds
From the Esso Research and,
Engineering Company, $5x000 was
accepted as a one-year subscrip-
tion to the Industry Program of'
the College of Engineering.
George A. Fuller Company gave
$5.000 to establish the George A.
Fuller Company Award "for the
most needy Tau Beta Pi Civil En-
gineering student during his,
senior year, the selection of this
student to be made by the dean
of the College of Engineering."
The Regents accepted $5,000
from Eli Lilly and Co. for studies;
on the evaluation of metahexa-
mide to be directed by Dr. J. W.
Conn.

,
.
1
,7
,

By JEAN HARTWIG
ministration, her days were spent
Eleanor Roosevelt. called the in paying and receiving the ex-
first lady of the world, will give pected political calls.
the fourth University Lecture Increased Political Activity
Series presentation Tuesday in In 1924 when Roosevelt was,
conjunction with International stricken with infantile paralysis,
Week events. she increased her political activi-
Through her service to the ties on the advice of his physician
United Nations as chairman of in an effort to rekindle his inter-
the Commission on Human est in public affairs.
Rights, Mrs. Roosevelt has be- When her husband was elected
come probably the best-known governor of New York, a news-
woman of the world. paper wrote "the Roosevelts were

ume of her father's letters which
she edited and collections of her
newspaper columns and magazine
pages. She has also written "It's
Up to the Women," "The Moral
Basis of Democracy." and two vol-
umes of her autobiography en-
titled "This Is My Story" and
"This I Remember."
Critics Disapprove Cliches
Critics of Mrs. Roosevelt's writ-

Among the list of her books ing disapprove of her use of
are three children's books. a vol- cliches and her naive tone. She

Given for Scholarships J
Bendix Aviation CorporationI
gave two grants, one of $3,500 for
a graduate scholarship and one of
$850 for an undergraduate schol-
arship.
The Regents accepted $4,220
from various donors to establish
the Dr. Elizabeth Crosby Memor-
ial Fund which is to be used for
a memorial volume of the "Jour-
nal of Comparative Neurology."
Upjohn Company has given one
grant of $3,000 for hypertension
research to be conducted by Dr.
Sibley Hoobler of the Medical
School, and one of $1,000 to es-
tablish the Upjohn Company
Neurology Research Fund.
To Aid Engineers
A $2,050 grant was accepted
from Babcock and Wilcox Com-
pany for the Babcock and Wilcox
Aid to Graduate Engineering and
Technical Education Fund.
The Regents accepted $1,875
for the Naval Architecture and
Marine Engineering Scholarship
from the National Association for
Engine and Boat Manufacturers,
Inc.
From the Foundry Education

Born 74 years ago to a socially now a political team. Eleanor and
prominent family, the stateswo- I was a phrase common in Gov-
man's father was a noted sports- ernor Roosevelt's intimate discus-
sions of issues, policies and plan."
After March 4, 1933. the in-
auguration date of FDR, she
began her term of 12 years as
the first lady of the country. In
her first year in the White House
she began the first press con-
ferences exclusively for women
journalists ever held by the Pres-
: 'ident's wife.
Begins Extensive Travel
Since the President was unable
to tour the country because of his
physical infirmity, she began to
travel extensively to all sections
of the United States, visiting New
Deal projects and bringing back
reports of public opinion.
The true extent of her influ-
ence in Roosevelt's administration
was a subject of extensive discus-
sion, but it was generally agreed
that she was very interested in
the humanitarian projects of New
Deal legislation.
In 1936 she began a syndicated
daily column for women called
"My Day" which dealt with ev-
erything except politics for three
years. In 1939 an obvious change
came over the series and she be-
gan to discuss relief measures,
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT W.P.A. and the maintenance of
E.LEANO IrOOS LT e United States neutrality.
... opens International Week Changes Daily Column
man and big game hunter and A New York newspaper noted
her mother was a famous beauty. that not only was Mrs. Roosevelt
Theodore Roosevelt, the twenty- writing on political topics, but
fifth president of the United what she had to say either anti-
States, was her uncle. cipated or supplemented the Pres-
iAlarried at 19 ident's statements. By 1941 she
was listed as one of the 10 most
Living with cousins, she taught powerful people in Washington.
at the Rivington Street Settle- A British magazine summarized
ment House before her fifth Mrs. Roosevelt as a political for e,
cousin, Franklin Delano Roose- writing, "Mrs. Roosevelt in the
velt, then a Harvard undergradu- early days represented just that
ate, asked her to marry him when side of the new administration
she was 19 years old. that regular politicians disliked
The couple was married in 1905, most . . . It took politicians some
a date chosen because Theodore time to realize that political rules
could be in New York to give the did not apply to the Roosevelts,
bride away, when Franklin was a less even to Eleanor than to
student at Columbia Law School. FDR.

has been praised, however, for
her sgicerity. warmth and the
thoughtful content of her works.
Tall. distinguished looking
Eleanor Roosevelt, who has re-
ceived honorary degrees from
American universities as well as
Oxford in England and Lyons in
France. has earned her title of
number one world citizen.

U

ownwoomw

SHE'S THE QUEEN IN A
KINGDOM OF CRIME!
M-G-M Presents
rPA R TYVGI RL'
ClNEMASCOPE ' METROCOIOr
Robert Cyd Lee I
TAYLOR- CHARISSE COBB
John IRELAND
with KENT SMITH . CLAIRE KELLY ."COREY ALLEN
BARBARA LANG." MYRNA HANSEN

"PATIENCE"
or "BUNTHORNE'S BRIDE"
U. ofMK
GILBERT & SULLIVAN SOCIETY
, Tickets on Sale Nov. 17-22
LYDIA MEN DELSSOHN BOX OFFICE
8 A.M. - 5 P.M.

Also Cartoon - News
Novelty

r

l
i
a
t
a
s
t

SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT
INTERNATIONAL WEEK
A NEW EXPERIENCE FOR LOVERS OF ART FILMS

I I

In

Mrs. Roosevelt first came in
contact with politics and govern-
ment when FDR was elected New

Ann Arbor Civic Ballet
and
U of M Modern Dance Clue
PRESENT
f
American Dance Co.
At The Ann Arbor High School
Auditorium
Sunday, Nov. 23
at 8:00 P.M.

Admission
$3.50 - $3.00 - $2.50 - $2.00 - $1.50

Foundation, $1,500 was accepted York State Senator. Moving to
to establish the Foundry Educa- Washington when her husband
tional Education Wheelabrator was appointed assistant secretary
Fellowship. of the Navy under the Wilson ad-
TONIGHT at 8
RACHEL FIELD'S
AlThi~ds anmdd
Heaven, Too.
with BETTE DAVIS,
CHARLES BOYER, JEFFREY LYNN
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents
Hear ELECTRA RECORDS rec
JOS H WH I
on records: JOSH AT MIDNIGHT
FOI K S(TCJ('C

E
r

'She Was An Asset'
"They began to think that,
however distressing it might be
to admit it, she was an asset."
After her husband's death and
her election as chairman of the
United Nations' Commission on
Human Rights, she set about the
project of drafting a Declaration
of Human Rights to emphasize
the personal, procedural, social
and political rights of men.
After traveling to Russia in
1948, Mrs. Roosevelt said that she
thinks the U.S. can reach an
agreement with Russia, although
it is hard to convince the Soviet
Union that it is standing in the
way of peace and security because
of its suspicion and fear of the
rest of the world.
No Elective Post
Mrs. Roosevelt has often been
mentioned as a possible candidate
for political office, but has said
she will never seek an elective
post.
Refusing the chairmanship of
the UN Human Rights Commis-
sion in 1951, she made a trip to
the Near and Middle East which
led to her latest book, "India and
the Awakening East."
A year later she toured Japan
and revisited Europe, making a
trip around the world in 1955, vis-
iting the Soviet Union and areas
of Soviet Asia in 1957 and again
this fall.
Writes Many Articles
Mrs. Roosevelt has written
many magazine and newspaper
articles reporting about service-
men stationed overseas, discuss-
ing women in politics, and advo-
cating higher wages and greater
prestige for teachers.

SUNDAY SUNDAY
From 1 P.M. CAMPUS from P.M.
t*

I

o of satisfied customers...
RUGGLES
S. VAN
INSTEP*
Says Ruggles: 'Yeah, well, ya
see, it's like this . . . the other
day I just happened to be kinda
layin low, ya unnerstan . .. like
I mean, I just like to get away
from things when they start
buggin me... anyway, I wound
up in the basement of Kwik 'n
Kleen. Man, you o14ghtia see 'em
handle the threads! I mean it's
;reat, mnan-,.,., bring a closetfull."

STARTING
TODAY

A

DIAL
NO 2-3136

SWEEPING UP FROM THE HELL BELOW...

I

N16- -or I1

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