100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 14, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY BCm

AY,

Electronic Music Expresses
Modernness-Stockhausen

By JAN RAHM
"Concert halls and opera halls
are remnants of an old burgeois
society," Karlheinz Stockhausen
said yesterday. ,
Music that was composed for
these places was great art in its
time, but it has become "frozen,"
especially because of being per-,
formed on the radio, and is nowI
crowding out new musical develop-:;
ments, the German composer, au-
thor and lecturer told his audience
in a speech sponsored by the
music school.
Between 1900 and 1950, com-,
posers were trying to say new
things, but there was a contra-
diction between the old instru-
ments that were being used and
the new sounds the composers
wanted.
Electronic Music Born I
With the realization of this
contradiction, electronic music
was born in 1953 in a CologneI
radio station, Stockhausen said.
Because most music today is
heard, not in concert and :opera
halls, but over loudspeakers, he
explained that electronic music
was a new form of musical expres-
sion designed to be heard only
through loudspeakers and pro-
duced through radio transmission,
records and tape.
First one sound wave is recorded
on one tape, another on a second
tape, and so on.rWhen all the
sounds are prepared, the tape is
spliced and, if necessary, synchro-
nized on several tape recorders.
No Performers Used
Normally, no instruments which
require performers are used. Stock-
hausen explained that the com-

SGC Starts
Panels, File
For Library
Student Government Council has
initiated two academic programs
for student use.
"Pulsebeat of the Twenties," a
combination panel discussion and
seminars wil be held Sunday at
the Union, Roger Seasonwein, '61,
chairman of SGC's Reading and
Discussion Committee, announced.
The discussion is the culmina-
tion of the Summer Reading Pro-
gram in which a list of books deal-
ing with the politics, literature,
economics, sociology and history
of the twenties was given students.
Six University professors will
take part in a panel discussion to
begin at 7 p.m. The seminar groups
will be held at 8:30 p.m.
"Alil interested students, whether
they were part of the actual pro-
gram or not, are urged to attend,
Seasonwein explained.
Lois Wurster, '60, co-chairman
of SGC's Education and Welfare
Committee reported yesterday that
the Literary College examination
files has been placed in the Under-
graduate Library.
The file will be open from 8 to
10 p.m. on Mondays, Wednes-
days and Thursdays and will have
an attendant in charge. Identi-
fication cards will be required in
Sorder to use the file.
The file contains examinations
for 90 courses, with more to be
added throughout the year, Miss
Wurster said.

Fresh Air Drive Begins

Mrs. Roosevelt
To Talk at 'U'
Eleanor Roosevelt will speak at
the University Tuesday in Hill
Auditorium.
In coordination with the open-
ing of the University's Interna-
tional Week program, Mrs. Roose-
velt will discuss the question, "Is
America Facing World Leader-
ship?"
She will appear at the Univer-
sity as the fourth of the Univer-
sity Lecture Course attractions
this semester.
The performance will begin at
8:30 p.m. and tickets may be pur-
chased daily at the Hill Audi-
torium box office. Lecture Course
officials have also said that phone
orders will be accepted.

7
3
7

STOCKHAUSEN
.. . modern composer
poser needs only a couple tech-
nicians to help him put the com-
position together.
He noted that this lack of musi-
cians to play the music has been
a cause for alarm for some people.
But he called this a necessary
thing in o~ur modern age.
Stockhausen explained that!
noises are used a great deal in
electronic music. These are the
sounds that are produced elec-
tronically because it is easier and
better to use regular instruments
and human voices rather,than try
to try to imitate their sounds, he
said.
New Imxprovisations Possible
However, spontaniety of indi-
vidual performers need not be
lost, he added. In fact, he contin-
ued, electronic music brings a new
kind of improvisation in allowing
the musician to use the composer's
basic notes, -but playing them in
various random arrangements,
tempos, and volumes.
Stockhausen illustrated points
in his talk by playing several com-
positions by him and by other
modern composers. The selections
played showed the wide range of
possible sound combinations which
is used in producing electronic mu-
sic. The audience was amused by
some of the music, and Stock-
hausen commented that new tech-
niques usually cause laughter until
people are used to them.
"No matter how one feels aboutj
electronic music, it shows the way
to produce music integral - to
radio," Stockhausen said.

-Daily-Harold Gassenheimer
TAGGED-President Harlan Hatcher takes a tag from a student
worker after contributing to the Fresh Air Camp Bucket Drive.
The proceeds from the drive, which extends through Saturday
afternoon, will be donated toward the purchase of necessities for
underprivileged children.

SCOLLEGE ROUNDUP

Py NAN MARKEL
BERKELEY, Calif.-- Harvard
University will be joined in its
self-imposed exile from the Na-
tional Students Association by the
University of California at Berke-
ley.
Berkeley's student government
recently voted withdrawal and
passed a motion directing a peti-
tion campaign to put the decision
up for student approval.
* * *
EVANSTON, Ill. - A survey
among landlords operating hous-
ing for foreign students at North-
western University is to be con-
ducted by the student govern-
ment's human relations commit-
tee.
Opinions and reactions on inte-
grated housing will be noted. The
information will be turned over

to the city of Evanston human re-
lations council for use in their
current study of housing segre-
gation in Evanston.
The Evanston committee is
working on a measure to enforce
integrated, non - discriminatory
housing for the entire city.

that the university's Board of
Trustees have approved plans for
a cancer research addition to Uni-
versity Hospital,
Erbe' Praises

NASHVILLE, Tenn. - In an nU piErection
article on "Why Students Crack
Up," the dean of George Peabody Poll Workers
College for Teachers emphasized
that some students become so en-
snarled they can no longer' con- Elections Director Richard 'Erbe,
centrate on their work or studies. '61, yesterday praised the people
These students break down responsible for the Student Gov-
mentally, emotionally and physi- ernment Council elections.
cally, sometimes having to be hos- Nan Macleod. '61, served as sec-
ptialized, or requiring the aid of retary for the elections committee
a psychiatrist. , and Fred Merrill, '60, was head of
"Part of the reason is found in the candidate training program.
the individual - his inherited Bob Gunn, '60, took charge of
characteristics, biochemistry and the candidate open houses, while
age," Dean Rogers believes. Part, Sarah Howley, '60, served as per-
she also said, comes from the new sonnel director. Polls director was
responsibility of making adult de- Vic Henrich, '61, and publicity was
cisions and taking their results. / managed by Howie Stein, '61, and
X ( Art Repak, '61.
COLUMBUS, Ohio -The Ohio Count Night Chairma was
State Lantern announced Monday Karen Korzack, '61.
the disc shop presents
JOSH" HIE YA Pep4t'n
friday, nov. 21 . . . 8:30
at The Armory (4th & Ann St.)

DESCRIBES BIRD FOSSILS:
Wetmore Gives Memorial Lecture

A Rackham Amphitheatre audi-
ence heard Alexander Wetmore,
research associate and former sec-
retary of the Smithsonian Insti-
tute, describe various birds in
North America of the Pleistocene
period on Wednesday evening.
Delivering the annual Ermine
Cowles Case Memorial Lecture,
under the auspices of Sigma Xi
and the Museum of Paleontology,

Prof. Wetmore described the major
locations on the American conti-
nent where considerable bird fos-
sils have been found.
Fossils Unearthed
"The first fossils were unearthed
from sites near Fossil Lake, Ore,,
in 1876,'" Wetmore said, "with
most of these early finds being
aquatic: cormorants, swans, geese

SHE'S THE QUEEN IN A - -
KINGDOM OF CRIME!
M-G-M Presents
~PARTY GIRV'
CINEMASCOPE - METROCOIOr
starring
Robert Cyd Lee J.
TAYLOR- CHARISSE COBB
John IRELAND
with KENT SMITH . CLAIRE KELLY - COREY ALLEN
BARBARA LANG " MYRNA HANSEN
Also Cartoon - News
Novelty

and gulls." The asphalt pits in
southern California also contain
countless fossils," he continued.
"The skeletons of the birds ren-
dered immobile by the tar have
been well preserved, and of the
117 species discovered there, only
20 are extinct."
"The main obstacle to system-
atic collection of bird forms is that
much of the material is fragmen-
tary," he said. "Besides, some re-
searchers have overlooked the
small skeletons of birds in favor
of the larger reptile and mam-
malian skeletons."
Mexican Birds
Of the 796 species that include
the living population of birds from
Mexico north, 281 were found in
Pleistocene deposits, Wetmore
said, with the most conclusive in-
formation about these fossil avians
being derived from the latter por-
tion of the period.
"The pressure of the Pleistocene
glaciations reduced the variability
of many species," he concluded,
"with those least adaptable becom-
ing extinct. Glacial retreats have
also forced mass migration of the
birds from one region to another."

reserved seats -$2.75
avc
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

gen. admission -$1,65
,ilable at
and also
LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
State Street branch

- - -

MASONIC
AUDITORIUM
DETROIT

SEATS NOW!

Direct from
LONDON

f
T
'HE

NOV.
Fri.,

21, 22, 23
Sat., Sun.

I.

I

GIRLS!

Organization
Notices

11

COM PANY
WITH
JOHN NEVILLE - BARBARA JEFFORD * LAURENCE HARVEY
In Exciting Productions of Plays by WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE
Directed by MICHAEL BENTHALL
Friday and Saturday Evenings, November 21 and 22 at 8:20
Saturday Matinee, November 22 at 2:20
"HENRY V"
Sunday, November 23-Matinee at 2:20 and Evening at 8:20
"HAMLET"
Matinees: Main Fl.: $2.75, 3.30, 3.85. Bac.: $1 .65, 2.20, 2.75, 3.30
Evenings: Main Fl.: $3.60, 4.20, 4.80. Balc.: $y.80, 2.40, 3.60, 4.20
Mail Orders to Masonic Temple, 500 Temple.
Enclose Self-Addressed, Stamped Envelope.

W A HUSBAND
SCENE
Nov. 20,21, 22nd at 8:00 P.M.
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE.
HOW?
Buy a ticket to "PAT I ENCE"
Tickets On Sole at Administration Bldg.

Congregational and Disciples Guild,
luncheon discussion, Nov. 14, 12:00
noon, Guild House.
Graduate Outing Club, hiking and
supper. Nov. 16, 2 p.m., meet in back
of Rackham Bldg. %N.W. entrance).
* * *
Newman Club, membership dance
(Dave Juilliet and His Men of Music),
Nov. 15, 9-12 p.m., 331 Thompson. Pick
up tickets now - two per member.
* * *
University Ice Skating Club, organ-
izational mneeting, Niov. 18, 7 p.m.,
Lounge, WAB.
Wesleyan Guild, social and recrea-
tional evening, Nov. 14, 8 p.m., Wesley
Lounge.

"

L

-

.ill

MUSKET presents

"OKLAHOMA!"

i,

II;

III

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan