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November 04, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-11-04

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TUTESD AY, NOVEMBER 4,

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T 17

'U' To Raise Regulations
On Apartment Permits
By JEAN HARTWIG
cience halls, she had to write a
University women will find it petition listing her reasons. After
"relatively" more difficult to get consideration by the committee.
apartment-s next year, Elsie R. her request was usually honored.
Fuller, assistant Dean of Women,. Decisions Change
told Assembly Dormitory Council The difficulty presented by this
ye~terday. procedure was that 50 per cent
Due to more room available in of the girls who made such peti-
the University residence hall sys- tions changed their minds be-
tem, apartment restrictions will tween April and June. causing a
probably be stricter for junior wo- lot of extra work for the commit-
men who will be seniors next year, tee.
although no definite policy has In the discussion Julie Wasson,
been made, she said in a discus- '60, said no house could have
slion concerning the movement of much group spirit if it had 50
women from one residence hall to girls who were forced to stay. Also
another. speaking in favor of last year's
The discussion centered around policy, Siva Marshall, '61, added
the University's problem of mov- ' that house unity is not destroyed
ing Mosher-Jordan house back to by the policy because the resi-
its original building and provid- dents who are the most active in
ing a nucleus of women for Bush the house will probably not want
and Seeley houses, which are pres- to move.
ently occupied by the residents of Speaking on behalf of the wo-
Jordan. men of Mosher-Jordan Hall, cur-
The situation this year has been rently living in Bush and Seeley,
altered slightly with the establish- houses in Markley, Mary Ann
ment of Mary Markley Hall, which Pfundt, '59, explained that she
is over 50 per cent freshmen. The thought the nucleus of the house
policy of last year, the first plan would choose to move back into
for intra-residence hall moving in their original hall, but just as
many years, according to Mrs. many would elect to stay in
Fuller, was "in preparation to go- Markley. Most of the sophomores
ing back to normal living after who will be juniors next year will
overcrowding for four years." go back, she said.
In former years women had to A committee to consider the
sign a preference for their own problem of intra-residence hall
house for the next academic year. moving will be appointed by the
If anyne wanted to switch resi- ADC board at the end of the week.

WCBN Network To Cover
National, Iocal Elections

Speech Department To Give Three Plays
"Williams in Three Movements,"
the second in the series of the
speech department's experimental
plays, will be presented at 4 p.m.
tomorrow in the Arena Theatre of
the Frieze Building, according to
Thomas Skinner of the speech
department.
The program will feature three
one-act plays by Tennessee Wil-
liams unified by the theme:
"Childhood, Youth, Age. Music
will be used to unify the separate
productions into a three-act «
drama. >
"This Property Condemned," the
first play, is the dialogue between
two children playing near an
bAhndoned railroad track in Mis- .

ELECTION PREPARATION-B
continuing until returns are cone
casting network will handle pers
from headquarters in Lansing. I
equipment.

DIAL NO 2-3136
ENDING TONIGHT

m

sissippi. The production will fea-
ture an illusion of a railroad em-
bankment created by ladders and
saw horses.
A man and a women in a
tenament room on a cold, grey
afternoon forms the basis for the
second play "Talk to Me Like theI
Rain and I Will Listen."
The third presentation in the
playbill concerns the dreams, of
two derelicts trapped in a board-
ing house in the French Quarter of
Daily-Robert Kanner New Orleans.
egiming at 9 p.m, today, and The playbill, entirely student
usive, WGBN, the ca.mpus broad- produced and directed, also fea-
al ve ageBo, el ctoeulrtsd-- tures a cast of students in the
onal coverage of election results speech department.
Here, one of the students checks The first play will feature Susan
TrBergholtz as Willie and Larry Car-
The campus broadcasting net- bonelli, '59, as Tom. Richard De-
work, WCBN, has scheduled ex- Beck, '59, will direct the produc-
tensive coverage of the national, tion and the sets will be designed
state and local elections geing held by Ellen Wittmen, '61.
today, Arthur Moritz, '61E, of the J. Ivan Tomcho, director, and
radio station's business staff, an- Robert Kadanec, Grad., designer,
nounced yesterday. will present Tom Leith, '59, and
Begnngytr p.tdayad Carolyn Albus, 59, as the man and
Beginning at 9 p.m. today and woman in "Talk to Me Like the
continuing until the major re- Rain and I Will Listen."L
sults are in tomorrow, the station R an En gi ss s d
will devote its programming to Nancy Engass, '60, as Mrs. Hard-
announcements of the latest elec- wicke Moore, Shirley Madrono, '60,
tion returns and "election feature' as Mrs. Wire and Don Catalina,
stories," he said, with a program '59, as the writer will appear in
of music scheduled between the the third play, directed by Libbey
Sundel, '59, and designed by Paul
Appel, '59A&D.
Robert Holm, '61, acting news
director, will be in charge and,
William Beer, '59Ed, will be the Pr f o s t
chief announcer. ro
Source of election returns, Mor-- 0
1 ;..z exp.aneu, wu...;11 Ina44nT UUT"*r I1I-

I

-Daily-Robert Kanner
SPEECH PLAYBILL - Tom Leith and Carolyn Albus portray
a scene from the one-act playbill sponsored by the speech de-
partment entitled "Williams in Three Movements." Unified by
the theme "Childhood, Youth, Age," the program will be present-
ed tomorrow.
ORGANIZAT ION NOTICES

DIAL
NO 8-6416

WEEK DAYS
AT
'7 and 9 P.M.

I

Alpha Pi Mu, Ind. Eng. Dept. Student-
Faculty Coffee Dour, Nov. 4, 4-5:30
p.m., 214 WE.
Amer. Chem. Soc.-Student Affiliate
meeting, Nov. 5, 7:30 p.m., 1200 Chem.
Speaker: Dr. Parry, "Selection for
IGraduate School.}"
* * *
Ballet, Ballet and Jazz lessons givenl
Nov. 4, 7:15-9:30 p.m., Barbour Gym.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
coffee break, Nov. 4, 4:30-6 p.m., Guild
house.
Graduate Student Coffee Hour, Nov.
5, 4-5:30 p.m., Rackham Bldg., 2nd
Floor, W. Loung. Speaker: Dean Saw-
yer, "Election Results and Nuclear Test
Banning." All graduate students invited.
* * 9
Italian Club, weekly meeting and cof-
fee hour, Nov. 4, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze
Bldg., Romance Language Dept. Lounge.
Students interested in things Italian
are invited to attend.
* * *
Newman Club, Grad. meeting, talk!
and discussion by Miss Louise Cuyler
(Music Dept.) on "Liturgical Music"
with recorded examples, Nov. 5, 8 p.m.,
331 Thompson St.
Phi Chi Theta, panel discussion on
"Careers for Women in Bus. Adminis-
tration," Nov. 4, 3 p.m., Rm. 141, B.A.

Public Reliltions Conn. of sGC, Com-
mtitee meetig, Nov. 4, 4 p.m..,1543
SAB. Interested students welcome.
U. of Mich. Rifle Club, regular prac-
tice, Nov. 4, 7 p.m., Rifle Range near
Undergrad. Lib. All welcome, come to
side door.
Women's Rifle Club, meeting and
practice, Nov. 4, 7 p.m., WAB. Every-
one welcome, no experience needed, all
equipment furnished. For information,
call 345 Mosher.
* * *
Chess Club, regular weekly meeting,
Nov. 4, 7:30 p.m., Rm. 34, Union.
* * *
United Christian Federation, noon
discussion, Nov. 4, 12 noon, Lane Hall.
Sponsored by 11 protestant denomina-
tions. Open to anybody. Topics of
world concern.
* * *
United Christian Federation, Weekly
All-Campus Mid-Week Worship, Nov. 5,
4:15 p.m., Douglas Memorial Chapel,
State and William. Sponsored by 11
denominations.
* * *
Fortnight Committee, turn in scripts
Ties., Nov. 4, in the undergraduate of-
fice of the League in marked box.

I

e " W ' ',Tr CRACKLES
WJTH EXCITEMENT!
w dhMAGAu NOEL, of RI$W'- and 'Pauinate.Summe r"
NoOESAE UIG AT1 IUET

1I

I

R LADY T
p
AES
I ER
LD

i

DIAL
NO 2-2513

I

he identical
iceure now
n its New York
rng run!

itz explained, will be the United
Press International teletype wire
service. If "any major results" are
received after 3 a.m., WCBN will
return to the air to broadcast
them, he added.
Student reporters will be sta-
tioned in Lansing to gather infor-
mation on the state elections, Mor-
itz said. The students, he ex-
plained, will be stationed at the
election headquarters of statej
gubernatorial candidates, Gov. G.
Mennen Williams and Paul A.
Bagwell.
They will telephone "election
features" from the headquarters
which will be, directly broadcast
to the WCBN audience, Moritz
said.
WCBN, which has separate
studios in South, West and East
Quads, is a student-operated or-
ganization in both its entertain-j
ing and technical staffs.

I

I

4

also
Walt Disney's
"PAUL BUNYAN"
All Cartoon Featurette
Wednesday-
"IN LOVE AND WAR"

See it
at
Regular
Prices

I '

Use Daily Classifieds!

On Evolution
"Degeneration in evolution is
a very general process," Prof. Curt
Kosswig of the Zoologisches Staat-
sinstitut and the University of
Hamburg, Germany, said.
"Most highly developed organ-
isms have lost some organs, modi-
fied and elaborated others, and
developed organs entirely unrep-
resented in ancestral stocks," said
Prof. Kosswig, who spoke yester-
day afternoon at a public lecture
sponsored by the zoology depart-
ment and the Museum of Zoology.
In degenerative, or retrogres-
sive, evolution, there is remark-
able adaptation. Structures relat-
ed to flight undergo reducation.
The large body size of fish would
result in the inability to fly. Also
among birds, the loss of teeth is
adjusted to the wider use of beaks.
The cave animals are the best
examples of degeneration corre-
lated to the environment. The cave
fish are blind as a result of loss
or reduction of the eyes, and col-
orless owing to reduction of body
pigment.
Moreover, there is correlation
between blind, intermediate, or
normal eye condition and no,
moderate, or full pigmentation,
among the cave fish. Much varia-
bility is found among these fish
and a genetic basis can account
for degenerative effects.
As to the origin of these reduc-
tions, Darwin postulated that they
may be due to disuse. His beliefs
were refined by current concepts
of evolution which suggest, that
in the absence of selection pres-
sure favoring maintenance of the
organ, gene mutation may pro-
ceed unchecked and degrade the
structure.

reserved seats - $2.75
ov(
THE DISC SHOP
1210 S. University
(open evenings)

gen. admission -$1 .65
failoble at
and also
LIBERTY MUSIC SHOP
Smote Street branch

. .v -----

rr r
c, .y yU ?} h ti b \o Lam? v.?
12

the disc shop presents
JOSH 1WHITIE YetAje'Pn
friday, nov. 21 . 8:30
at The Armory (4th & Ann St.)

DEPT. OF SPEECH
PLAYBILL '58 159I
BOX OFFICE SALE
SEASON TICKETS
OPENS TOMORROW AT 10:00 A.M.
"AH, WILDERNESS!"
TICKETS ON SALE STARTING
THURSDAY, NOV. 6
LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATRE

4

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L I~ - ~ ~

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