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October 25, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-25

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PAGE

IPUV. MAN IMAn V

s~dY 'UW W'WWW ' rA:°S 1.ix~a~ Av t V flAl.V ?AOa

Wolverines,
Both Teams Go After First
Conference Win of Season
(Contlnued from Page 1)
Minnesota, in addition to play-
A shake - up in the Michigan ing for the Jug, will attempt to
backfield will probably move Dar- redeem last year's defer' at the
rell Harper into a starting role hands of Michigan. At that time
today for the first time. Harper tl.e Gophers were a top contender
has looked extremely good in past for Big Ten laurels, but the Wol-
has ookd exremly ood n pst erines completely burl-ed them.
games, in running and particularly ! Warmath will play predomi-
in punting. natly the same team that has
Co-captain Bob Ptacek injured played all season. The Gopher of-'
an ankle last week in the North- fense will be centered about quar-
western game, and at that time terback Jim Reese. Reese pres-
it appeared very doubtful whether ently ranks fifth in total offense
he would play any more this sea- in the Big Ten.
son, let alone today. But the sturdy Football is a funny game. You
senior has responded in amazing can never predict an outcome,
fashion and from all indications it but by 4 p.m. today everyone will

Gophers

Vie

for

Brown

Jug

Today

MANY STARS HOBBLED:

Injuries Plague Nation's Top Teams
By JIM BENAGH Joe Tranchini, who has a shoulder Louisiana State, the team to Air Force should get a good
A plague of injuries throughout iniury. watch in the South, takes on Flor- flight test from passer Lee Gross.
Bob Reifsnyd'rerth"e Middies' All- ia n a night affair. The Tigers
the nation could throw an already A ersica tackle, is still out of tie are one of 10 major undefeated cup. All-America quarterback can-
topsy-turvy college football season lineup with his season-long in- teams in the nation. didate, and his Utah mates.
into further turmoil this afternoon. juries. Navy. however, is still fa- All Undefeated Colorado has the best rushing
Such popular favorites as Army,. vored over Pennsylvania. d record in the nation and takes the
fNavy , Notre Dame and Southern KNotre Dam.e is hopinrg that it The others, excluding Army,} are
Methostre hae bnhithad at best back, Nick Petrosatean Ohio State, Mississippi, Air Force, field a heavy ?avorite over Nebras-
ke positions. All-Anerica guard Al Ecuyer will Colorado, Texas, Air Force, Iowa, ka.
Ary tkeson Pbe ready to go against Purdue. Rutgers and Auburn. The latter Texas has a big Southwest Con-
Army takes ofn Pittsburg fwi Southern Methodist, still off the four have been tied once each. ference date with Rice,
Harry aservics a touh Texan whlK pace since pass-master Don Mere- Mississippi posts its five straight Rutgers visits Lehigh with tal-
bloks dith got hurt in the Notre Dame triumphs against winless Arkan- back Bill Austin, who has provided
has thrown numerous keybo loss earlier in the season, tackles sas, while fellow southerner Au- the offensive punch during its four
for ethe Cades' halfback combr of once-beaten Georgia Tech. burn contests M aryland. consecutive triumphs.
Dawkins Injured
Dawkins may be slowed down by
injuries suffered in Army's 35-6
runaway from Virginia last week.
Pittsburgh is ranked number twvo ~' 0 ~ ~ ~R~
behind the West Pointers in the
running for the Eastern champion-
They'll rely on the passing of

GOPHER SOPHOMORE - Tom Brown, a hometown boy from
Minneapolis who has made the Minnesota first team as a sopho-
more, is one of the top linemen for the Gophers. At 224 pounds he
is a fast and hard-hitting guard.

appears that Ptacek could start1
today. His leadership qualities will
be a most important factor in de-
termining whether Michigan can
bounce back. At yesterday's "dress
rehearsal," the quarterback said
his ankle felt pretty good.
Noskin Is Back
Another good sign for the Wol-
verines is the fact that Stan Nos-
kin is also back in form after
missing last week's game because
of a hip injury. This means Mich-
igan will have its one-two quar-
terback punch operating once
more,
Line Remains Same
Michigan's starting line will be
intact. However, problems occur'
in the second line. Tom Jobson
still is not able to play and Willie
Smith is probably out for the re-
mainder of the season.
Today's game is the 49th in a
series that dates back to 1892.
Michigan has won 30, including
last year's 24-7 win, and lost 15.
There have been three ties.
TODAY'S LINEUP
MICHIGAN MINNESOTA 7

know the answer to the question-
can Michigan bounce back?

Iowa-NU Tilt Heads Big Ten Card;
Ranked Seventh, Eighth in Country

I

1 4^ ", "W - --- - 7-

By TOM WITECKI
Iowa and Northwestern, co-lead-
ers in the Big Ten grid race along
with Ohio State, clash at Iowa
City today to feature a four-game
conference schedule.
The two squads, ranked seventh
and eighth in the nation, will be
battling to maintain their un-,

beaten records. Northwestern has
four straight wins to its credit
while Iowa's record is marred only,
by a 13-13 tie with the Air Force
Academy.
Iowa Favored
The experts (who picked only
one out of five conference games
correctly last week) rate Iowa a

ON THE I-M SCENE:
Delts Whip SAE, 13-12

Ivan Toncic and their usually
tough linemen. This could be a
touchdown favorite. However, the game for the 60-minute men of
role of underdog doesn't bother both teams.
Coach Ara Parseghian's squad, Navy, still suffering from Satur-
since they have won in this role day's loss to a previously winless
four times this fall. Tulane eleven, will be without its
At Columbus, defending Big Ten first string ends and will get only
champions Ohio State will have limited service from quarterback
their hands full with a strong
Wisconsin team. The Badgers have ' "
lost only once and will be out to H arriers
knock the unbeaten Buckeyes from
their second position in the na-
tional rankings. TakeI Third
At Champaign, Ill., Michigan U J
State will try to bounce back from
last week's loss at Purdue in a Michigan's cross-country team
contest against the Fighting Illini. finished third in a seven-school
Sparta oac ufy D augherty field at yesterday's Notre Dame
has been juggling his lineup all Invitational meet at South Bend.
week and may play Larry Bielat, Western Michigan, with a low
who started the season as a fourth score of 23 points, won the meet.
stringer, at the starting quarter- Notre Dame was second with 41
back position. and Michigan was third with 88,
Purdue faces a tough non-con- points. Western's Art Eversold ran
ference opponent in Notre Dame. the four miles in 19:46 to take
The Fighting Irish have lost only individual honors,
once this year to powerful Army; Dave Martin was best for Michi-,
thus, the Boilermakers should be gan, finishing 10th in the field of
in for a rugged afternoon in their 50 with a time of 20:44. Walt
annual inter-state contest with Schafer was 14th, Jim Wyman
their neighbors from South Bend. 19th, Dick Schwartz 22nd, and Don'
Indiana hosts Miami of Ohio in Truex 23rd were others who placed
another non-conference game, for the Wolverines.

ON

7 H E

Prahst
Genyk
Callahan
Dickey
Marcinlak
Deskins
W. Johnson
Ptacek
Harper
Julian
Rio

LE
LT
LG
G
RG
RT
RE
QB
Ll
R1i
FB

*SAB 3BAThl

Gehring
Wright
L Gerths
Svendsen
IR Brown
Wallin
Schultz
Reese
I Soltis
R Kauth
F Rogers

Delta Tau Delta eliminated Sig-1
ma Alpha Epsilon yesterday in1
first place "B" social fraternity
playoffs, 13-12.
The Delts were led by Bob Carl-
son, who scooted into the end zone
for the first TI) and passed to
George Hastings for the second
score.j
SAE tied the game on passes'
from Mike Ratterman to John
LaSage and Bob Thompson. But it
was Carlson's superb passing to
Tom Hudak that pulled out the
victory for the Delts in the over-
time period.

In the Independent league action
1207 trounced the Pioneers, 16-0,
while the Buckeyes got the best
of Terrace, 14-6. In other games,
Evans' Scholars, led by Dick Gates,
swamped the Printers' Devils, 24-0;
Kitchen Keepers whipped the Wes-{
leyans, 26-0; the Hawaiians edged
Cooley Elders, 12-8, and C.M.S.
took Actuaries, 8-0.
Faculty scores were: Zoology 14,,
Cooley Building 0; Sociology 14,
Economics 0; Air Science 8, Bus
Ad 0, and Chemistry 8, Philos-'
ophy 0.

wo .............. i

MICHIGAN GRADUATE OF 1904:
Tells True Story of 'Little Brown Jug'

(This is the true story of the Little ,3
Brown Jug, as told by Thomas B.
Roberts, a graduate of Michigan in
1904. The story has been passed on!
to The Daily by Mrs. George L. Pal-
mer of Chelsea, a 1956 graduate.)
By THOMAS B. ROBERTS
It is a fact that I played an'
important, though at the time un-
witting role in the founding of.
the tradition of the Michigan-
Minnesota "Little Brown Jug,"
frequently referred to as America's
most famous football trophy.
It is also a fact that all tradi-
tions, in the passing of the years,j
acquire many inaccuracies.
The chief inaccuracy in this in-
stance is that whereas, in all theJ
magazine and newspaper stories,
as well as the radio broadcasts
pertaining to the famous Jug, event
in the athletic records on the
Michigan campus, you will find'
frequent mention of one Oscar
Munson, a janitor of the Minne-j
sota gym.

:

LITTLE BROWN JUG
... traditional trophy

No Mention at Michigan who stated, that
But in no ,single one will you whereas the "horseless carriage"
find any reference whatever to a would probably someday be per-
bald, aging, insignificant realtor fected, its means of power would
from Oak Park, Ill., by the name definitely be steam because the
of Tommy Roberts. SIC TRANSIT internal combustion engine was
GLORIA. entirely impractical.
I deem it a privilege, therefore, Such was the scene, the year
to here set down for posterity, the 1903, the third of Coach Fielding
true and authentic story of the H. Yost's famous "point a minute"
Little Brown Jug. teams at Michigan. "Point a Min-
But, first, let me take you back ute," there's not much hyperbole
approximately 50 years and set in that; look at the record and
the general scene. Theodore Roose- judge for yourself:
velt is President of the United 1901 - 11 games: Michigan
States. We have recently fought 550, Opponents 0
and won a comic opera war with 1902 - 11 games: Michigan
Spain, and we are still singing 644, Opponents 12
"There'll Be a Hot Time in the 1903 -- 12 games: Michigan
Old Town Tonight," "Just Break 565, Opponents 6
the News to Mother," and "Good- That last little bit of history has
bye My Bluebell." an important bearing on the story
Odd Dress that is to follow.
Men's dress was characterized Brutal Games
by rolled rim derbies, high stiff And to properly understand that
choker collars, and peg top trou- story, you must remember that in
sers. Women wore so-called "rats" those days the game of football
in their hair, their hour - glass was considerably different from
figures were draped in skirts that what it is today. Those were the
came to their ankles, and their brutal, bruising, bone - crushing
shoes buttoned half-way to their days, Any forward passing of thei
knees. ball was illegal.
Bathing suits were a combina- The yard markers were five
tion of a baseball player's uniform yards apart, and you had three
and a quilted bedspread, and they downs to make those five yards,
wore their shoes and stockings in and they were plenty tough to
swimming. Fanny was a typical make with only running plays
girl's name and John a boy's name. available. There was very little
Those were calm and unruffled sportsmanship or ethics, the idea

patrick, now deceased, sent the
little Student Manager out to pur-
chase a receptacle wherein to pack
the drinking water, which would
be free from suspicion.
The Jug was not brought from
Ann Arbor as all the accounts
have it, but was purchased in a
little variety store in Minneapolis
at the cost of just thirty cents. It
was a five gallon jug, therefore not
"little" and was originally about
the color of putty, therefore not
"brown."
Hammond Saves Day
Neither team scored during the
first half (there were no quarter
periods then), and the going was
rough and rugged. Time and timeF
the day was saved for Michigan
by the toe of fullback Tom Ham-
mond, the late Brigadier General
Thomas S. Hammond, until his
death as President of the Whiting
Corporation of Chicago. His kicks
that day averaged 50 yards. 1
After the intermission, Michi-
gan came out fighting. And with
Hammond, tackle Joe Maddock,
and the great Willie Heston carry-
ing the ball, Michigan finally
drove across the goal line (a five
point score in those days) and
Hammond kicked goal - score,'
Michigan 6, Minnesota 0,
The Sunday papers gave Ham-
mond credit for the touchdown,
and Ann Arbor accounts written
years later say it was Heston. But
it was actually Maddock who'
carried the ball over.j
Can't Protect LeadI
Michigan then fought valiantly
to protect the slim margin of that
hard earned score, but it was not
to be. In the thickening darkness
of an incipient snowstorm and the;
gathering shadows of a dreary
October afternoon, a giant Minne-
sota tackle is said to have crashed
over for a touchdown and kicked
to tie the score.
Again the inaccuracies credit
tackle Bill Schact with the touch-1

down. It was really made by a!
then obscure substitute, now a re-
tired wealthy physician of St. Paul,
Dr. Egil Boeckmann.
I have his letter which states:
"I have to go back to ancient his-
tory, but I did substitute as full-
back and make the touchdown. We
had three yards to go for a first
down and six yards for goal and
made the goal on a cross-buck;
that is, I stood behind the right
guard and went through between
left guard and center,"
Game Ends Early
The game still had two minutes
to go, but those two minutes were
never played. The frenzied Minne-
sota crowd surged onto the field,
sweeping along with it the little
student manager who had pur-
posely abandoned his thirty cent
jug which had served its purpose.
Michigan's first game in three
years that was not a victory be-
came history.
The following Monday morning
when Munson, the Minnesota
janitor mentioned above, was
cleaning up the litter on the fields,
he discovered the jug on the Mich-
igan bench and took it to the
Athletic Director, who labeled it
with the euphemistic legend,
"Michigan jug,. 'captured' by Os-
car. October 31, 1903."
That game was so brutal that1
Personalized
A CHRISTMAS
CARDS
25 Albums To Choose From,
10 OFF until Nov. 1
OVERBECKS
1216 Scutfi university

Michigan and Minnesota severed!
athletic relations until 1909. At
that time Minnesota wrote, "We
have your Little Brown Jug, come
up and win it," which Michigan
proceeded to do by the score of
15-6.
Minnesota did not see the jug
again for 10 years until 1919, when
the Gophers won, 34-7.
Perhaps it is a matter of poetic
justice that the Jug, now over a
half-century old, has spent ap-
proximately half of its existence
on the campus of each of these
two great universities.
I CAN STATE THESE FACTS
WITH SOME DEGREE OF AC-
CURACY BECAUSE I WAS,
THAT STUDENT MANAGER
FOR MICHIGAN.
And in conclusion, if you will
permit me to paraphrase the words
of Robert W. Service:
"These are the simple facts of
the case,
And I guess I ought to I
know.
They say that Oscar 'discovered'
the jug
And I'm not denying it's so.
The years have deprived me of
most of my hair,
The little that's left is gray;
But I'm the guy that
PURCHASED the jug,
And they'll never take that
away."
LAKE DESIGNS
-ARTS AND CRAFTS--
-MOSAICS--
-JEWELRY-
209 SOUTH STATE STREET
Be(ow, Bob arshall's
Book Store4
_ . _ - -__

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
(National Lutheran Council)
Hill St. at S. Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor.
SUNDAY-9:00 & 11:00 A.M. Worship Services.
Dr. Taito Kantonen, Guest Preacher.
10:00 A.M. Bible Study.
6:00 P.M. Supper.
7:00 P.M. Program: Dr. Taito Kantonen, Speak-
er. "The Inner Unity of Lutheranism."
THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Englewood
Lester F. Allen, Minister
SUNDAYS: 10:00, 11:00 A.M.; 6:30 P.M.
WEDNESDAYS: 7:30 P.M.
RADIO: Sundays 5:30 P.M. WXYZ 1270
"Herald of Truth."
For transportation to services Dial NO 3-8273.
PRESBYTERIAN CAMPUS CENTER
at the First Presbyterian Church
1432 Washtenaw Avenue, NO 2-3580
Miss Patricia Pickett, Acting Director
Robert Baker, Assistant
SUNDAY-
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00, Dr. Kul-
zenga preaching.
10:30 AM, Seminar, "Christian Beliefs.'
11:30 AM, Coffee Hour
6:00 P.M. Supper Clubs.
7:00 P.M. "The Loud Lecture" at Methodist
Church. "Witnessing Church in the Eye of the
Storm." Tracy Jones speaking.
8:00 P,M. Bible Study and Interest Groups.
TUESDAY--
9:00 P.M. Coffee Hour at Pat Pickett's apart-
ment, 217 5. Observatory. t
FRIDAY -
6:00 P.M. Graduate supper.
8:00 P.M. Halloween party
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
William C. Bennett, Pastor
8:45 and 11:00 A.M. "God's Acceptance of Sin-
ful Men.,"
10:00 A.M. Sunday School.
5:45 P M. Student Guild and Youth Groups.
7:00 P.M. Missionary Christmas Service, Dr.
Kenneth t. Pike speaking,
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH AND
WESLEY FOUNDATION
120 S. State St.
Merril R. Abbey, L. Burlin Main,
Eugene A. Ransom, Ministers
9:00 and 11:00 AM, Worship: "The Knight,
Death and the Devil," Dr. Tracy Jones Jr., a
Henry Martin Loud lecturer, speaking,
9:30 A.M. Discussion Group, "The Jigsaw Puzzle
of Christianity and Vocation."
7:00 P.M. "A Witnessing Church in the Eye of
the Storm," Dr. Tracy K. Jones speaking.
The worship services (9:00 A.M., 11:00 A.M.
and 7:00 P.M.) will all be held in the sanc-
tuary.
MEMORIAL CHRISTIAN CHURCH
( isciples of Christ)
Hill and Tappan Streets
Rev. Russell M. Fuller, Minister
10:45 A.M., Sermon: Rev. Russell Fuller, THE
MISSION OF THE CHURCH.
Sunday, 6:15 P.M.
The Student Guild will meet at 6:15 P.M. at
the Congregational Church for refreshments
and later attend the Loud Lecture: Speaker
Tracy Jones, A Witnessing Church in the Eye
of a Storm.
FIRST UNITARIAN CHURCH
1917 Washtenaw at Berkshire
10:00 A.M. Church School.
10.00 A M -Adult Discussion Group-Maung
Hling- "Buddhism in Burmese Society'
11:00 A.M. Service of Worship. Sermon-"Dona
Nobis Pacem"-Edward H. Redman.
7:00 P.M. Student Group--Dr. Benno G. Fricke
-"Are College Aptitude Tests Worth Their
Salt?"
Transportation furnished.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN STUDENT
CHAPEL AND CENTER
1511 Washtenaw Avenue
(The Lutheran Church-MissOuri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theo. A. Kriefall, Vicar
Saturday, 4:15 to 5:30: Open House after th
Game
Sunday at 9:15 and at 10:45: Worship Services,
with sermon by the pastor, "Reformation Sun-
day Reflections."
(holy Communion In both services).
Sunday at 9:15 & 10:45: Bible Stcdy Classes.
Sunday at 6:00: Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student,
Club, Supper and Program, with Reformation
Program entitled, "God is Our Refuge and
Strength."
Reformation Day, Fri., Oct. 31: Free showing of
MARTIN LUTHER movie in the Chapel.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
William and Thompson Streets
Rev. John F. Bradley, Chaplain
Rev. Paul V. Matheson, Assistant
Sunday Masses: 8:00, 9:30, 11:00 AM. and
12:00 noon.
Weekday Masses: 6:30, 7:00, 8:00 and 9:00 A.M.
Novena Devotions: Wednesday evening, 7:30 P.M.
Rosary and Litany: Daily at 5:10 P.M.
Classes each evening in Christian Doctrine, Apolo-
getics, Church History, Scholastic Philosophy,
in the Father Richard Center.
CAMPUS CHAPEL
(Sponsored by the Christian Reformed Churches
of Michigan)
Washtenaw at Forest
Rev, Leonard Verduin, Director
Res, Ph, NO 3-0982; Office Ph. NO 8-7421
10:00 A.M. Morning Service.
7:00 P.M. Evening Service.
CHRISTIAN REFORMED CHURCH
1131 Church St.
Dr. E. H. Palmer, Minister
9:30 A.M. Dr. Med Stonehouse will speak to the
combined adult classes.
10:30 A.M. "The Lords Prayer. VI. Lead Us Not
Into Temptation."
7:00 P.M. "The Reformation: Solo Gratio,"
BETHLEHEM EVANGELICAL
REFORMED
United Church of Christ
423 South Fourth Ave.
Rev. Ernest R. Kloudt, Minister
10:45 A.M. 125th Anniversary Service - "A
Noble Heritage" by Prof. Theodore L. Trost.
7:00 P.M. Student Guild.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST,
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
9:30 A.M. Sunday School.
11:00 A.M. "Probation after Death" Is the lesson
sermon.
A free reading room is maintained at 339 South
Main Street. Reading room hours are: Monda
11:00 A.M, to 8:30 P.M. Tuesday through
Saturday 11:00 AM. to 5:00 P.M. Sunday
2:30 P.M. to 4:30 P.M.
FRIENDS (QUAKER) MEETING
Friends Center, 1416 Hill St.
10:00 and 11:30 Meeting for worship.
10:00 Sunday school and college discussion.
11:30 Adult discussion,
7:15 P.M. Young Friends.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
State and William Streets
Dr. Fred E. Luchs, Minister.
Services: 9:30-10:20 and 11:00-12:00 "SEREN.
DIPITY -Dr. Fred E. Luchs Preaching,
Bible Lecture, 10:20-10:40 DAVID-Mrs. Fred
E, Luchs.
TWO SESSIONS of CHURCH SCHOOL: 9:30-
10:40 & 10:55-12:00 (ages crib through
ninth grade).
STUDENT GUILD: Refreshments at 6:15 (Con-
gregational Church). Go to Methodist Church
at 6:50 for "Loud Lecture' by Tracy Jone,
Vr A K~Wn'aIP e LIIIrt Li A U%*rSc

11

41;

ai

.11

11

41,

TODAY'S HOMECOMING EVENTS
You Won't Want to Miss Them!
*Mudbowl Contest SAE Hous--9-30 A.M.

111 FIRST BAPTIST CHMuURCH'i11Z11. AI' ,U~EYY5 t FUP5.ti UAND 1 titl

2

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