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October 19, 1958 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-19

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUIMi

'I

I I I I II I I I M1 I I II I

,A

RACLES BY ACCIDENT': Foundation
U' Television Program To Award
[ Depict Medical Finds -
racles by Accident" will be .
pic explored on the Univer- Star," the second segment of the The National Science Founda-
levision series "Understand- Gosling of the geography depart- thion is now accepting applications
ar World" presented at 9 a.m. ment serving as hosts. for two fellowship programs cover-
on WXYZ-TV, Detroit. On the initial program, Gosling ing approximately 1200 fellowships
Thomas Flotte, surgery pro- will interview Prof. James Crump to be awarded on March 15, 1959.
in the medical s hool, will of the Far Eastern languages and The fellowships are given in the
ne three scientific and medi- literature department who will mathematical, physical, medical,
iscoveries that were made analyze Communist Chinas grow- mstature engineering and other
ntally. He will be assisted by ing strength and its rise to stature blicegineeing anthr
rao adprfssoalatosas a major power, sciences including anthropology,
ator and professional actors psychology (with the exception of
ill assume the roles of Am- .clinical psychology), geography
Pare, father of modern sur- and some interdisciplinary fields
William Rontgen, discoverer Theranists and selected social sciences. They
X-ray and Alexander Flem- are awarded to United States
ho discovered penicillin. - citizens solely on the basis of
Potte will discuss the lastingc n lh H oed M eetmy asy.o
H ol whyteofe dscentists wereM eeing ability
cance of each discovery> and .Under the predoctoral fellowship
n y the se scientists were prograni, fellows receive an annual
position to interpret their The annual meeting of the stipend, payment of tuition and
kes" successfully. American Occupational Therapy fees, dependency allowances for
Discuss "Industrialization" Association, to be held from Tues- married fellows an limited travel
George Fischer of Brandeis day to Friday in New York City, and special allowances. All appli-
ity will discuss "Industrial- will be attended by 10 occupa- cations for the year 1959 to 1960
i and Soviet Politics" on the tional therapists from the Uni- must be in by Jan. 5, 1959.
sity television series "Ac- versity Medical Center. Three Categories Involved
which will be presented at Four of these will be discussion Fellowships under this program
a.m. today on WXYZ-TV, leaders at the meeting this year. are awarded in three categories.
t, They are: Elizabeth Boles, direc- First year fellowships, carrying an
f. Fischer will join Prof. tor of occupational therapists in annual stipend of $1800, are
in Ballis of the political the Neuropsychiatric Institute; awarded to students who are just
e department in examining Lyla Spelbring, supervisor of oc- entering graduate school or who
rialization as a key to be- cupational therapy at University will not yet have completed a year
of the Soviet Union. Hospital; Beverly Granger, a re- of graduate study at the beginning
. Fischer will explain the search assistant in physical medi- of the tenure of their fellowships.
s for his belief that recent cine and Jennie Lucci, an occu- Seniors who will receive their
cal and industrial advance- pational therapist at University baccalaureate degree during this
in Russia call for an im- Hospital. academic year are eligible for these
e response from the United Marjorie John; Elizabeth awards.
Sharpe; Phyllis Doyle, supervisor Intermediate fellowships, with
Two Series Debut of occupational therapy in the an annual stipend of $2000, are
ay marks the debut of two psychiatric unit; Ellen DeVine, available for students who have
ries to be featured on the senior technician in' pathology; completed a year of graduate study
sity's "Television Hour" at Barbara Feallock and Margaret but still require more than one
. on WWJ-TV, Detroit . M. Kirchman are the other mem- more year to complete the require-
opening program of bers of the University Medical ments for their doctoral degree.
ce: Quest and Conquest" will Center who will be attending the Fulfill Requirements
titled "'Columbus. in Cape meeting.
eral." Prof. Marston Bates of At the conference, special em- Terminal year fellowships carry
ology department will trace phasis will be placed on methods an annual stipend of $2200 and
story of man's search into of communication used in work-ae awarded tereremntsf
ing with brain-injured, blind, deaf pect to fulfill the requiremet o
TeDraona thenotica-miets na doctoral degree within one year.
na: The Dragon and the and psychotic patients. The postdoctoral fellowship pro-
gram awards fellowships to those
who have received a doctoral de-
STAGE THURS., gree in science or the equivalent
N STAGE ' OCT. 30 in scientific training. These fellow-
PERSON at 8:30 P.M. ships carry an annual stipend of
11 $4500, payment of tuition and fees,
dependency allowances for married
fellows, and limited travel and
90 WEEKS on Broadway special allowances. The closing
DpfrRpE41 date for applications under this
CKERMIT BLMGARDEN presents "program is Dec. 22, 1958.
For information and application
ships, interested students should
materials regarding these fellow-
write to the Fellowship Office,
National Academy of Sciences-
National Research Council, 2101
rch. $4.00 - $3.50, Bale. $2.50, $2.00, $1.50, Box Office Friday Constitution Avenue, N.W., Wash-
ington 25, D.C.
Mayor Names
HOME UN Festivities
MOVIES.For Friday
Ann Arbor will observe United
Nations Day on Friday according
fnest family iof them all to Ann Arbor's Mayor, Prof. Sam-
uel J. Eldersveld of the political
.. . science department.
Last week, the mayor announced
the appointment of Leonard J..
Chase to head a committee to
work on plans for United Nations
Day. The event is part of x state-
wide and nation-wide observance.
- - In his proclamation, the mayor
y said "The great principles of the
Charter of the United Nations,
emphasizing that durable peace
can spring only from freedom and
justice for all the peoples of the

earth, accord with the spirit of
the historical documents and
principles on which our own na-
tion has been built.
"In troubled situation after
troubled situation the United
Nmtions has received our help in
nlW M w IECAMRA KT T2.3maintaining at least the uneasy
B . Cpeace which marks our decade.
But our support has never been
Genuine Kodak movie kit at this low, low price! blind and uncritical," he noted.
"The United Nations is an or-
Great team for indoor-outdoor movie-making. This handsome ganization in a world where war
ly packaged outfit includes the deluxe-model Brownie Movie is always a possibility-and the
Camera with fast f/2.3 lens and the Brownie 2-Lamp Movie problems with which it must deal
Light, complete with reflector flood lamps. Titler Board for are the most difficult confront-
easy home-movie title-making also included. ing mankind. The road to a world
of real peace is long and tortuous.
All for350 Yet the United Nations is one of
the few avenues through which
Buy at the age-old cry for peace, freedom
and brotherhood may be im-
plemented," the mayor continued.
Noting the specialized United
Nations agencies, the mayor said
he particularly hoped that, during
the observances, special attention
would be paid to these agencies
Ph t e p rtme: nt and the work they do to encourage
PDtgreater food production, better
SOUTH STATE AT NORTH UNIVERSITY health, higher living standards
and greater educational oppor-
tunities.

THEATRE NOTES

By JEAN HARTWIG
In his own words, Sir John Giel-
gud, one of the world's foremost
living actors of the legitimate
theatre, has "three besetting sins,
both on and off the stage-im-
petuosity, self-consciousness and
a lack of interest in anything not
concerned with myself or with the
theatre."
The British actor, who has giv-
en more than 500 performances
as Hamlet, will preser1t his unique
Shakespearian monodirama "The
Ages of Man" at 8:30 p.m. Tues-
day in the second presentation of
the University Lecture Series.
Gielgud's dramatic recital, a
compilation of themes from
Shakespeare's plays and sonnets,
will include readings depicting the
progression of stages in the life
of man, including youth, manhood
and old age. The reading was
presented at the Edinburgh festi-
val last summer where the critics
called it "perfection-a sheer de-
light."
Long Theatrical History
Descending from a theatrical
family, Gielgud saw his first play,
the immortal "Peter Pan," at the
age of seven. Although he did well
in religious studies and English at
preparatory school, he decided to
forego a University education to
try his luck at an acting career.
His family finally consented to
the plan, but stipulated that he
would have to become an archi-
tect if he didn't make a success of
himself in the theatre by the time
he was 25 years old.
Acting came quite easily to him
and he studied at a dramatics
academy, "a very vain sixteen
year old," as he characterized his
early assurance. His dramatics in-
structor, however, said he walked
"exactly like a cat with rickets."
Played 'Herald'
His first role on the stage was
that of the Herald in "Henry V,"
which consisted of the line "Here
is the number of the slaughtered
French." During the early part of
his career, he became "typed" as
the neurotic, rather hysterical
young man.-
Playing in various repertories,
he succeeded Noel Coward as
Nicky Lancaster in "The Vortex"
in 1925. The following year he
played in "The Cherry Orchard"
and "The Three Sisters under

Komisarjevsky" before appearing
in New York in 1928 as the Grand
Duke Alexander in "The Patriot."
Joining the Old Vic Company,
after a rather cool reception to
his American debut, Gielgud
scored his triumph as Hamlet in
a production that had the second
longest run on record for the play
in London.
Critic Praises Gielgud
One critic said of Gielgud's suc-
cess as Hamlet: "Such a voice,
such diction and such a gift d
maintaining the melody of Shake-
speare's verse even while keeping
it edged from speech to speech
with dramatic significance, is a
new experience."
Although he appeared in a few
early silent movies, he found his
best expression in his "talkies,"
the first of which was "Insult" fol-
lowed by "Secret Agent" in 1936,
which was directed by Alfred
Hitchcock.
Gielgud is known primarily for
his distinctive speaking voice,
"supreme in our time for lyrical
flexibility," -according to one crit-
ic. A series of Gielgud's recitations
from Shakespeare including son-
nets and excerpts from "Hamlet"
and "Richard III" has been re-
corded by the Linguaphone Insti-
tute.
Directs and Acts
Now equally well-known for his
directing success as well as his
acting prowess, he attributes his
"talent" to a perfect sense of tim-
ing and an ear for the right em-
phasis and shades of meaning.
"Pay no attention to the punc-
tuation. That's one way writers
torment actors. It's the meaning
you must observe. Think out the
meanings. The reading will de-
pend on the thought and motive,"
he advised a young actor who was
struggling with a part in "Medea."I
A special velvet backdrop will
be brouglit to Hill Auditorium for
the Shakespearian actor's one-
man show. He will present ex-
cerpts from "Cymbeline," "Ham-
WANTED
Fighting Michigan voters who
want a working, fighting United
States Senator in Washington to
Re-elect United States Senator
CHARLES E. POTTER
Republican State Central Committee
DIAL NO 2-2513

let," "Midsummer Night's Dream,"
"Twelfth Night," "The Tempest,"
"Romeo and Juliet," "Merchant of
Venice," "Much Ado About Noth-
ing" and several other plays and
sonnets.
Wrote Autobiography
Writing his autobiography, "The
Early Years" at the age of 30,
Gielgud has written several maga-
zine articles on Shakespeare and
the theatre in general. He has also
been the subject of several books
-and articles.
One of the most interesting
sidelights on Gielgud's personality
is told by an actress whom he di-
rected in "The Trojans." Sir John
is normally a chain smoker and
this was one of the most difficult
aspects about his work here,'since
smoking is strictly prohibited in
the auditorium and on the stage.
His secretary had a little catch-
all bag in which she carried var-
ious sorts of mints, chocolates,
wafers and bottles of tonic water.
These she put in his hands when
she sensed that the going was
getting a little too rough for him."
Gielgud and Shakespeare should
be an interesting combination.

Tonight at 8
JAMES THURBER'S
"The Male Animall"
with HENRY FONDA,
OLIVIA DE HAVILLAND
SHORT: Gang War
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

_

GINA BACHAUIER

PIANIST FROM ATHENS, GREECE
MONDAY, OCTOBER 27
at 8:30 P.M. in HILL AUDITORIUM
PROGRAM
Sonata in A major, Op. 2, No. 2 ....... .BEETHOVEN
Sonata in F minor, Op. 5 ................BRAHMS
Three Preludes .........................DEBUSSY
Fantasy in F minor ...................CHOPIN
Three Etudes from Op. 25..............CHOPIN
TICKETS: $3.50 - $3.00 - $2.50 - $2.00 - $1.50
University Musical Society
Burton Memorial Tower

P'

_ _ . - .

DIL NO 2-3136
"ONE OF
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OF OUR TIME!"
-Paul Beckley, N.Y. Her. Trib.
ONE OF THE GREAT ONES!
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UNITED ARTISTS
Released thru % IEo
Continuous Shows from 1 P.M.

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"DARING AND
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-N.Y. Daily New
fDIAL NO B-6416

'

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