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October 10, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

N

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

v

- - %Aw Oro4* 4 o aic*

,FRIDAY..OCTQBES 10. 1958

t.

Exchange of Students with Russia
Increases World Understanding

WUS:
SGC

Group

Scientific Interdependence
Leads to IGY Expansion

By SUSAN REED
The international exchange of
students between the United States
and the Soviet Union last summer
has shown what an effective means
such a project is for bringing about
true understanding between the
peoples of the world, according tb
Edna Baldwin.
Mrs. Baldwin, who is the wife of
DeWitt Baldwin, co-odinator of
religious afairs at the University,
led a group of nine Lisle Fellow-
ships students on their recent visit
to the USSR.
Among those in the group were
Donald French, Grad., and Stu-
dent Government Council Presi-
dent Maynard Goldman, '59.
Talk to Russians
During the six-week "experi-
ment in international living," our
students found the Russian people
most courteous and eager to talk
about their countryand to give us
their impressions of the United
States, Mrs. Baldwin said.
Through informal discussion
groups, she said, we were able to
see each other's problems from the
other's side and to better under-
stand each other's ways.
One of the frequent topics of
discussion between the peoples df.
the USSR and the American stu-
dents which particularly inter-
ested Mrs. Baldwin was higher
education.
Work in Factories
In the USSR, she was informed
that it is frequently difficult to
enter an institute of higher learn-
ing directly from preparatory
school, so many of the students
go to work in a factory for two
years first.
This program is encouraged by
the 'government on the theory
that such an interim establishes
an understanding and solidarity
between students and workers,
Mrs. Baldwin explained.
Those Russian students who
would like to get into a scientific
institute, but who are unable to
do so, Mrs. Baldwin said, usually
enter a philological institute where
they receive a liberal arts educa-
tion aimed at one particular end
which, she added, is not as broad
as ours in the United States.
Call Education Free
The Russians feel that the
young people in the United States
do not have an opportunity for
Engineers
To Present
Annua DanCe
The Playboys' Prance, an an-
nual all-campus dance will be
held on Saturday; Oct. 11 in the
League Ballroom, the committee
announced.
The dance will begin promptly
at. 9:30 p.m. Johnny Harberd and
his orchestra with Jim Etchison,
soloist, will be the featured enter-
tainment. Midtime entertainment
will be provided by Prof. A. D.
Moore of the engineering school
demonstrating his juggling abil-
ities.
The theme, as dramatized by
the interior decorations, is "The
Modern Man." The dance has
been organized by Roger Barnes,
'61E, and Robert Chapman, '59E,
acting co-chairmen. Tickets can
be purchased at the Little Diag-
onal, Engine Arch or at the door.
The profits from this dance will
be used to erect a plaque honor-
ing the late Dean George Granger
Brown.

cans think of the Russian people
and their attitude toward their
government, Mrs. Baldwin said,
the people of the USSR genuinely
feel that their government is doing
much for Improving the welfare
of their country and its citizens.
To illustrate this, she cited the
extensive slum clearance projects
which are going on all over the
city of Moscow. New housing units
to meet the need of the continuing
heavy influx of people moving into
the city are being extensively
erected, she explained.
"The sight of all the building
cranes across the city's skyline is
not too different from all the oil
derricks in regions of Oklahoma,"
she added.
Work for Government
Occupationally speaking, Mrs.
Baldwin said, most of the Russian
people have found it more profit-
able to work for the government
rather than establish a small busi-
ness of their own, the only kind of
private enterprise permitted by
the government.,
Mrs. Baldwin seemed most im-
pressed with the fine way the
Soviet government has built up
their country's industries and cul-
ture and with all they seem to be
doing for the people.

EDNA BALDWIN
* * . discusses Russia

higher education unless they're
wealthy, she said.,
They believe American scholar-
ship assistance is far behind theirs
in the USSR. Young people who
are admitted to institutes of high-
er learning in the Soviet Union
receive what they consider a size-
able stipend.
This permits calling their educa-
tion "free," Mrs. Baldwin ex-
plained.
Plead Against War
Throughout their travels in the
USSR, Ms. Baldwin said she was
surprised to find that so many of
the Russian people feel that the
United States seems to be on the
verge of getting into a war from
time to time.
"The people pleaded with us
not to start a war," she exclaimed.
"They are most passioned against
this."
Mrs. Baldwin said she was es-
pecially interested in the revival
of interest in the churches and
religion among the common people
of Russia.
Renovate Old Churches
Curiously enough, she explained,
the government is not as violently
opposed to religion as it has been
since the revolution and is, in fact,
helping to finance the renovation
of many old churches within
whose walls lie much of Russia's
historic lore and color.
"The young intellectuals, how-
ever," she said, "have no know-
ledge of the development of reli-
gious thinking that has gone on
since the adventiof.the scientific
view in the world."
Encouragingly enough, she add-
ed, they are searching for answers
to the current perplexities in theo-
logical thinking which now con-
front them.
Contrary to what most Ameri-

MUSKET

t

To Conduct'
Bucket Drive
Student Government Council
will hold a campus-wide bucket
drive for World University Service'
(WUS) from 9 a.m. through 5
p.m. on Wednesday.
World University Service has a
double function as a help and
educational agency. Funds, which
are collected on college and uni-
versity campuses throughout the
world, are allocated to schools of
higher education in underdevel-
oped countries.
It also conducts seminars, con-
ferences and educational travel
programs for students and facul-
ty.
Use Funds for Housing
In 1958 donations to- WUS will
provide scholarships for European
refugee students in France, Ger-
many, Sweden, Switzerland, Brit-
ain and Algeria.
In Africa money will be spent
for educational equipment and
supplies, to support a revolving
student loan fund and for South
African medical student scholar-
ships.
Will Build X-Ray Unit
The construction of housing
units and a mobile x-ray unit will
be two projects which WUS plans
to undertake in the Middle East,
while in the Far East tuberculosis
wards will be equipped and books'
will be supplied to Korean and
Japanese libraries.
Programs in Southeast Asia
and Latin America will also be'
conducted.
The building and equipping of'
dormitories in Southeast Asia and
a $2,330 program in Latin Ameri-
ca will be effected with money
collected in the various WUS
drives throughout the country.
Center Plans
Social Night
Honoring all new foreign stu-
dents, the International Center
will hold its bi-annual reception
from 8 p.m. to midnight today, in
the Union Ballroom, according to
Kathleen M. Mead,.administrative
assistant.
"The Center sponsors such a
get-together near the beginning
of every semester to welcome new
students and to introduce them to
one another," Mrs. Mead ex-
plained "We also encourage other
students, faculty members and
interested townspeople to attend,"
she added.
The evening's entertainment
includes dancing to the music of
Hugh Scott and his band and free
refreshments.

Interdependence between the
different branches of science in
the study of the earth caused the
expansion of the International
Geophysical Year (IGY).
Although originally the main
aim of the IGY was to advance
our knowledge of atmospheric
changes, the whole IGY has mush-
roomed into fourteen parts, Prof.
Sydney Chapman, visiting lecturer,
said yesterday afternoon.
Five subjects are concerned with
the IGY programs for the earth
and oceans. These fields are lon-
gitudes and latitudes, gravitational
attraction and bodily tides of the
earth, earthquakes, glaciers and
oceanography.
Aims Called Similar
The original main idea of the
IGY was to be similar to the aims
of its two ancestors, the Interna-
tional Polar Years, of the years
1882-3 and 1932-3. The aims of
these years was to study the at-
mospheric changes of normal and
electrical weather.
But other fields such as ocean-
ography were needed to make the
findings more complete. Oceanog-
raphy was necessary for example,
because to study the lower atmos-
phere and its weather, it was
necessary to study the effect of
oceans.
Glaciers also help determine the
weather,. and they lock up much
more water than the oceans. More-
over, the growing and decaying of
these structures does affect the
earth, he said.
Enables Radio Estimation
The intensive IGY study of the
electrical weather of the upper
atmosphere enables the time of
passage of radio signals to be
estimated with exceptional accur-
acy," Prof. Chapman said. u
"Hence the IGY program was
extended to include several aspects
of the solid earth-its form and
size and rotation, its gravitational
attraction, its bodily tides, and
its earthquakes,dheadded. "The
earthquakes give our best means
of studying the inside of the
earth."
Many new instruments were
used in the survey, Prof. Chapman
noted. To determine true form and
size of earth, for example, a better
gravimeter was needed to measure
the strength of gravitational at-
traction.
for the
SHARPEST
GREETING CARDS
in town
always try
.FOLLETT'S
State St. at North U.

PROF. SYDNEY CHAPMAN
...IGY expands
The new gravimeter enables sur-
face ships to be used to measure
the gravitational attraction, some-
thing that was formerly precluded
by the vibrations of the ship:
Prof. Chapman is a noted as-
tronomer, geophysicist and mathe-
matician. He is International Pres-
ident of the Special Committee for
the IGY and has worked at the
University Engineering Research
Institute.

Union Plans
New Big Club
On Saturday
The Union's Little Club will be
created in a larger night club at-
mosphere this Saturday night
from 9:30 to 12:30 in the Union
Ballroom, according to John
Goodrich, '60, chairman of special
events.
This "Big Club" will initiate a
new and greater form of Saturday
night entertainment to add to the
popular appeal of Friday night
Little Clubs, Sandy Holo, '60,
chairman of the Social Commit
tee, said.
'Ray Louis's band will provide
the musical backdrop for Gail Al-
len, '61, vocalist; folksingers, Al-
bert Young, '61, and William Mc-
Adoo, '59; and David Newman,
Grad, master of ceremonies.

U0 of M.,
The Hallmark of
Fine Hairstyling
6 BARBERS - NO WAITING
715 North University'

Your color slides loot
brighter than ever with the
new Argus 300 Watt Pro.
jector. A new and improved
light condensing system
projects morejlight through
the new precision f:.8.
wide-angle lens.
Powerful cooling system
and blower keep elides and
projector safely cool.

PURCHASE"

a

f rom

"PURCHASE

I

Rehearses
Work has begun in all stages
of production and dramatics for
MUSKET's presentation of 'Okla-
homa!" to be given Dec. 4, 5 and 6
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
According to Jan Willoughby,
'60, productions chairman, all
facets of production are working.
The costume committee is con-
centrating on the dancing chorus
at the moment, he added.
"Several new innovations that
have never to my-knowledge been
tried in any "Oklahoma!" presen-
tation will be tried in our sets,"
Willoughby said.
Rehearsals for the cast are
stressing the setting up of stage
actions and positions, according
to Stephani Freedman, '60, stu-
dent director. Concentration in
perfecting the movements and
dramatics of individual scenes
will continue until November,
when the singing and dancing
groups will be correlated into re-
hearsals with the actors, Miss
Freedman said.
Any student desiring to work
on "Oklahoma!" may still sign
up in the MUSKET office on the
second floor of the Michigan
Union.

The DEL RIO
. 1 efor the BEST pizza in TOWN
also
SPAGHETTI * RAVIOLI * STEAKS * CHOPS * CHICKEN
CAL.s to order REAL CORNISH PASTIES
Also served Monday and Wednesday between 4 P.M. and 8 P.M.
CLOSED TUESDAYS

Regular $39.50

PURCHASE.3277
PRICE

i

PURCHASE
CAMERA SHOP

I

1116 South University
"Purchase from Purchase

122 W. WASHINGTON ST.

Phone NO 2-9575

NEW campus favorite

BhIG

C'L J 8

SATURDAY, OCT. 11
9:30-12:30

UNION BALLROOM
$1.50 per couple

NIGHT CLUB ATMOSPHERE

Al Young & Bill McAdoo
"Wildcat"!

starring

* Gail Allen
Mc-David Newman

4 ORGANIZATION NOTICES

AND THE RAY LEWIS BAND

r

TI

(Use of this column for announce-
ments is available to officially recog-
nized and registered organizations only.
Organizations planning to be active for
the current semester should register
not later than Oct. 10. Forms available,
2011 Student Activities Building.)
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
luncheon and discussion,: Oct. 10, 12
noon, 524 Thompson St.
* * *
Congregational and Disciples Guild,
recreation and toy making for Child-
ren's Hospital, Oct. 10, 7:30 p.m., 524
Thompson St.-
Graduate Outing Club, hiking, Oct.
12, 2:00 p.m., meet in back of Rack-
ham Bldg. (N.W. entrance).
s s s
Hawaii Club, meeting, Oct. 10, 7:30
p.m., TV Rmn., .Lane al.
Junior Panhellenic, Tradition picnic

Oct. 12, 1-5 p.m., Burn's Park.
* * *
Young Friends, meeting, Oct. 12,
7:15 p.m., 1416 Hill St. Speaker: Prof. K.
Boulding, "Life of George Fox."
* * *
Gamma Delta, Lutheran Students'
Club, square dance, Oct. 10, 8:00 p.m.,
Lutheran Student Center, 1511 Wash-
tenaw.
* s *
SGC-Student Activities Committee,
petitioning for Calendaring, Constitu-
tions and Campus Affairs Chairmen
and Librarian - due Oct. 15, 6:00 p.m.
SGC Area, SAB.
r

M TSIC SHOPS

--CAMPUS--
211 S. State
NO 8-9013

DEADLINE

TODAY

--DOWNTOWN-
205 E. Liberty
NO 2-0675

for the Finest in Recorded Music

I

I

THE BLOUSON LOOK . .. as interpreted
into a hand-knit look in

Apply for
STUDENT

BAN-LON

We have

SADDLE BASKETS!
(Bicycles, also)
Student Bicycle Shop
1319 S. University

It's in fashion-right
colors of red or blue.
A new Bulky-... bloused
at the hipline for
comfortable and flattering
look . . . fabulous fringed
collar . . . so different

L

.wrM w

N

I

WOLVERINE CLUB"

e. , so clever

sponsors

OVERNIGHT BUS TRIP

TO NORTHWESTERN
BUS LEAVES: 6 A.M. Saturday, Oct. 18th
From The Union
BUS RETURNS: 10 A.M. Sunday, October 19
COST. 0 Rnfl Ikll~nTDID

See our selection
of other regular
and bulky knits
in a harvest of
colors. Cashmere,
orlon, furblend and
lambswool .. .

NOW'

$898

'th

Store hours '. *
9:30-5:30
Mon. thru Sat.

Applications available at
Student Activities Building

Lower Level

1

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I

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