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October 10, 1958 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIE MICHIGAN DAILY

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'U' Changes
Planned Date
Of Speaker
Mrs. Eleanor Roosevelt's appear-
ance has been changed to Tuesday,
Nov. 18.
Her appearance in the Univer-
sity's Platform Attractions series
was originally scheduled for Oct.
29. This date was changed to
coincide with the University's In-
ternational Week at which she
spoke last year.
Recently returned from an early
fall visit to Russia, Mrs. Roosevelt
will speak on "Is America Facing
World Leadership?"
Tickets for the October date
may be used for Mrs. Roosevelt's
November talk in Hill Auditorium.
Tickets for all series appearances
are still on sale at Hill Auditorium.

ASKS BETTER COORDINATION:
Soop Advocates Study
Of Extension Services

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Formation of a State Council
on College and University Field
Services to conduct a continuous
study in the coordination of ex-
tension services at all educational
levels was recommended yester-
day at East Lansing by Everett J.
Soop, director of the University
Extension Service.
In a report given to the Com-
mittee on College Field Services at
a meeting in the ┬░Michigan State
Union, Soop also suggested that
junior and community colleges
accept a greater share of the re-
3ponsibility for programs of adult
education and collegiate study at
the underclass level for persons in
their respective communities.
As soon as these additional re-
sponsibilities are assumed, the

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four-year institutions can plan a
"gradual withdrawal" of under-
class courses in adult education
where junior colleges are located,
Soop added. Then, with the aid
of the junior and community col-
leges, the four-year institutions
can. plan more adult courses and
programs of study at the upper-
class and graduate levels.
Suggestions Made
These recommendations were
made after the Michigan Council
of State College Presidents sug-
gested the establishment of "a
single, integrated extension sys-
tem, involving all the nine tax-
supported colleges and universi-
ties and recognizing the unique
function of particular institu-
tions."
Soop commented further on the
present planned extension pro-
grams. He suggested that a
stronger and more comprehensive
program in extension education
on a shared basis be established
in institutions north of the Mus-
kegon-Bay City line and also that
joint planning of study programs
for more populous sections of the
state be seriously considered.
Announcement of regidnal pro-
grams of state supported institu-
tions could be made jointly among
the institutions, Soop said.

Board Plans
To Buy Land
For School
The Ann Arbor Board of Edu-
cation approved the purchase of
a 23.96 acre site of land for the
possible location of future schools
Tuesday night.
The land, located off Nixon
road north of Plymouth road, will
be used for construction of either
an elementary school, a junior
high school or a combination
junior-senior high school.
The purchase, approved by a
vote qf seven to one, cost $69,000.
The site is part of the 50 acre area
considered as a possible purchase
by the board this summer. The
larger site cost $144,000.
Expected residential growth in
the North Campus area as a re-
sult of industrial development
and University expansion was cit-
ed,as one of the- reasons for the
purchase. Several Board mem-
bers favored purchase of the
smaller plot because growth in the
area is only speculative.
The purchase is part of the long
range planning by the board
which enables them to purchase
the area at raw land prices before
the cost is raised as a result of ex-
pansion in the area, Trustee Al-
bert H. Marckwardt indicated.

DIAL
NO 2-2513

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Continuous
Daily
from 1 P.M.
"Brigitte's
Best
To Date!"

-Daily-Robert Kanner
TUNISIAN ON CAMPUS-Ahmed Bel Khodja, only student at the
University from his North African country, puts in a good deal of
time in Student Government Council offices in the Student Activi-
ties Building, working for jthe National and International Com-
mittee.
Ahmed Bel Khodj a Holds
'Activities Man' Scholarship

By THOMAS TURNER

OPENING NUMBER-TONIGHT at 8:30.
U of M PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

TON IGHT
7 and 9 P.M.
"THE
GLENN MILLER
STORY"
with James Stewart, June Allyson,
Louis Armstrong, Gene Krupa
*
Saturday 7 and 9 P.M.
Sunday 8 P.M.
"ALL QUIET ON THE
WESTERN FRONT"
with Lew Ayres, Louis Wolheim,
Slim Summerville
SHORT: "The Floorwalker," with Chaplin
ARCHITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

Most students on this campus
have presumably come here to get
an education, but one man holds
a scholarship to be an "activities
man."
He is Ahmed Bel Khodja, Grad.,
of Tunisia.
For one thing, Bel Khodja has
quite enough education to satisfy
most people, having spent four
years of graduate work in Middle
Eastern studies at the University
of London.
Student Leader
For another, he is the Univer-
sity's Foreign Student Leadership
Project representative, sent to
educate and be educated in the
area of student government.
While at London University the
30 year old Tunisian headed the
Tunisian Students' Union chapter
in Britain. He writes and speaks
DIAL
N4 2-3136

German; French, Arabic and: Eng-
lish,. and has put these languages
to work in jobs such as with the
Tunisian Embassy in London.
With this background, Bel Kho-
dia clearly met FSLP's standards
and was sent here by the United
States National Student Union's
FSLP program with the under-
standing that his time would go
in large measure to work with
students.
Represents NIA
So Bel Khodja represents Stu-
dent Government Council's Na-
tional and International Commit-
tee on the Board of the Interna-
tional Center.
And he is in charge of the SGC
committee's forums.
Bel Khodja stressed the idea
that students rather than faculty
members would provide the per-
sonnel for these forums, to be
held on problems of international
relations.
To Write Articles
Articles in The Daily on the
Middle East and North Africa, on
problems of nationalism and of
international student activity are
also in the works, the energetic
Tunisian said.
Bel Khodja has already partici-
pated in a Political Issues; Club
discussion on the French constitu
Student Talk
Students interested in:.inter-
national discussion are "Invited
to meet at 10:30 a.m. tomorroW
in the Student Activities Build-
ing, according to Ahmed Bel
Khodja, Grad., of Tunisia.
tion. He agreed with other speak-
ers that Algeria presents the major
threat to the success of Gen.
Charles de Gaulle's Fifth Re-
public, but said there is no solu-
tion short of independence for the
Arab state.
He feels quite strongly about
France's dissolution of the Al-
gerian Student Union, Bel Khodja
emphasized, since their Tunisian
and Moroccan counterparts have
had to carry the fight to get the
Algerian students scholarships in
non-French universities.
On this campus he only regrets
that he lives in Tyler Graduate
House, East Quadrangle, rather
than in an undergraduate dormi-
tory-he would like the additional
contact with students.

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ANTHONY NUTTING

Season Tickets Still Available - Seven Great Programs
Sir JOHN GIELGUD, Oct. 21 EDDIE DOWLING, Jan. 16
ELEANOR ROOSEVELT, Nov. 18 Sir JOHN GLUBB, Feb. 20
MARGARET WEBSTER, Nov. 13 NORMAN COUSINS, Mar. 13

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BOX OFFICE PHONE
NO 3-1511, EXT. 479

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@OLOR by b.UXa CINEM~ASCOPE!

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generation
THE UNIVERSITY INTER-ARTS MAGAZINE
Now Accepting Contributions for the Autumn Issue
FICTION * ESSAY * POETRY * ART
DRAMA * PHOTOGRAPHY * MUSIC
bring or mail material to
GENER ATICON

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