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October 02, 1958 - Image 3

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The Michigan Daily, 1958-10-02

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: r MT~a1'Av_ fnrVqnRFR 2 155

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE, TH M

THE MICIITGAN DAILY PAGE, THREir 17E

.U

ART MUSEUM EXHIBIT:
Artists Interpret Nature's Designs 'Intuitively'

New Course
To Explain
Soviet Life
Aim of the new Soviet Union
course is to "make vivid the Soviet
Union's development and its chal-
lenge to us," according to Prof.
William B. Ballis of the political
science department and chairman
of the course.
In accomplishing this, the new
interdepartmental course consists
of seven lecturers from five de-
partments who comment on vari-
ous aspects of Soviet life.
Lecturers. are Prof. Ballis; Prof.
Andrei Lonabob-Rostovski of the
history department; Prof. Morris
Bornstein of the economics de-
partment; and Prof. Deming B.
Brown, Prof. Horace Dewey and
Robert Magidoff of the Slavic
Language and Literature Depart-
ment.
So far the course is only being
offered during the fall semester.
Next year they would like to
make the two hour lecture course
a three credit course with two
hours of lecture and one of recita-
tion, if enough faculty members
are available to lead the recitation
groups.
Interest in this survey course is
part of a growing interest in Rus-
sia on the part of University stu-
dents, Prof. Ballis said. He said
approximately 50 students started
studying Russian last year, while
about 185 began Russian this se-
mester. One hundred ninty stu-
dents are enrolled in the interde-
partmental class.
Prof. Ballis also said that there
are more students who are work-
ing for B.A.'s and M.A.'s in Rus-
sian Studies. Among those major-
ing in this program are those in-
terested in journalism, government
work and teaching.

OPEN HOUSE
MICHIGAN TONIGHT
FLYERS, Inc. Thurs., Oct.
Refreshments 7:30 P.M.
& Hangar talk Rm. 3-S, Un
STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND STAFF

2

Ion

a

Boys!

Men!

WE NEED YOU!
To act, direct, produce, socialize
in the HILLEL RADIO CLUB
Call LI N DA RUSSEL or HOWARD SAXER
2021 Stockwell Hillel Foundation

-Daily-Robert Kanner
"HORIZONTAL TREE"-Reflecting a form familiar to nature, Dutch artist Piet Mondrian painted
"Horizontal Tree." Done in oil, it is one of many pictures now on exhibit at the Museum of Art
which parallel nature's basic designs.
G4

By CHARLAINE ACKERMAN v
Scientists probe the natural
world with the aid of delicate in-
struments, while artists interpret
nature's designs intuitively.
Yet, both uncover parallel pat-
terns and processes as revealed by
the University's Museum of Art
exhibition, "The New Landscape
in Art and Science," showing
through Oct. 26, on the first floor
of Alumni Memorial Hall.
The exhibition is composed of
photographs selected by Gyorgy
Kepes, professor of visual design

at Massachusetts Institute of
Technology, and works of art
chosen by Harris K. Prior, direc-
tor of the American Federation of
Arts (A.F.A.).
About 75 photographs capture
the minute detail of animal, vege-
table and mineral forms; the
broad expanses of aerial views of
the earth and telescopic views of
the firmament and the high-
speed pictures of sound, motion
and electrical patterns.
These are juxtaposed with

BECKETT COMMENTS:
Shots May Curb Epidemic

Whether or not the mounting
Detroit polio epidemic spreads to
out-state Michigan would seem to
depend on the amount of immu-
nization people have had, Dr. Mor-
ley Beckett, director of Health
Service, commented last night.
"I'm knocking on wood, but so
far there have been no cases re-
ported among the student body,"
he commented.
He observed that between 975
and 1,000 students received polio
shots at Health Service last Thurs-
WAA To Hold
Club Meetings
The Hockey Club has announced
an organization meeting to be held
tonight at 7 p.m. with interested
students meeting at the Women's
Athletic Building.
Thq Modern Dance Club will
hold its organization meeting to-
night at 7:30 p.m. in Barbour
Gym. This club is open to either
beginning or advanced dance stu-
dents.
Colored slides of the "Legend of
Xochipilli," a Mexican ballet pre-
sented last spring, will be shown
at the meeting. In addition to the
slides, a dance technique lesson
will be given and election of offi-
cers will be held,
Students may sign up for the
Fencing Club at its organization
meeting Wednesday, Oct. 8 at
5:10 p.m. at the Women's Athletic
Building.
No previous experience in fenc-
ing is necessary to become a mem-
ber of the club. Lessons will be
given for beginning members.

day, a marked increase over the
y number at the same time last year.
"This increase could well be be-
cause of the Detroit epidemic," he
said.
Emergency Centers Vaccinate
r In the meantime, emergency
centers in the Wayne County areas
outside Detroit vaccinated 16,837
persons Tuesday night, as men and
women continued to come to polio
vaccine clinics by the thousands.
Tuesday night's total was double
the number who sought protection
on Monday.
At the same time, 17 new polio
cases were reported in Detroit by
Dr. Joseph G. Molner, city-county
health commissioner. The new
cases bring this year's total to 500.
County Totals 647 Cases
The total Wayne County toll
thus far is 647 cases including 16
deaths. During the same period
last year, 228 cases - with three
fatalities - were reported.
Effects of the epidemic were
meanwhile being felt out - state,
particularly in Port Huron where
plans to send 400 teachers to a
two-day institute of District 6 of
the Michigan Education Associa-
tion in Detroit and Roseville, were
cancelled.
Howard Crull, Port Huron su-
perintendent of §chools, said he
thought it unwise to expose the
teachers to possible infection. Ad-
ministrative officers and the board
of education decided unanimously,
not to suspend classes Monday and
Tuesday to let teachers attend
the institute, as had been planned.
Similar decisions were made in
Port Huron and Fort Gratiot town-
ships, and in Lakeport.

about 25 works including wire
sculpture, paintings and drawings
in a variety of media, by such
artists as Albers, Bertoia, Dove,
Ferren, Greene, Hofmann, Junk-
ers, Kandinsky, Klee, Moholy-
Nagy, Mondrian, Pereira, Tobey
and von Wicht.
In this way, according to Mu-
seum Director Charles Sawyer,
observers will be able to see that
both artists and scientists reach
beneath surface phenomena to
discover basic natural patterns
and processes, that both artists
and scientists have discovered the
new scientific landscape.
The AFA's exhibit was inspired
by the book, "The New Landscape
in Art and Science," by Prof.
Kepes. The book points the way
toward a complete, integrated
vision of the inner world of
thought and feeling and the out-
er world of external nature.
Banks To Pay
Grocery Bills
-Knouse Says
Grocery bills paid by the bank
are foreseen in the near future.
According to Prof. Reno S.
Knouse of the business adminis-
tration school, supermarket shop-
pers will soon punch cards as they
pick up their groceries and check
the card at the door. These cards
will be forwarded to the banks,
which will check the total sum
off the shopper's account at the
end of the month.
Prof. Knouse said that a num-
ber of banks throughout the
country have already set up this
system. However, he forecasts, the
shoppers may be confronted with
the problem of forgetting to stop
spending.
Even today, he explained, a
considerable number of market-
ers arrive at the checkout counter
without enough money to pay for
their purchases, and these same
customers may overpurchase the
extent of their bank accounts and
have overdrafts.
Club To Hear
Story on Tape
An informal meeting of the Poli-
tical Issues Club will be held to-
night at 8 p.m. in Rm. 3B of the
Union.
Featured on the program is a
tape recording of Edward R. Mor-
row's "Who Killed Michael Farm-
er." The recording tells the story
of a crippled boy killed by a gang
of youths in New York.
Following the recording will be
discussion by Willard Maxey of the
Ann Arbor juvenile court.

Opera Star Calls Students 'Best Audiences';
Says Good Singer Must Have Right Teacher

By ANN EICHLER
The word "charm" is personified
by Roberta Peters, who opened
the University Choral Union Series
last night in Hill Auditorium.
Despite the cold evening and
the long plane ride she had just
completed, the coloratura soprano
of the Metropolitan Opera im-
mediately put those around her at
ease and began talking about her
career and her trip to Ann Arbor
as she would to a good friend.
"I have found that college stu-
dents make the most appreciative
and enthusiastic audiences," she
declared. "I enjoy singing for them,
because they do appreciate good
music. This is a group to which I
don't play down my singing. . . I
sing for them as I would at the
Met."
Likes Role of Zerlina
Oblivious to the confusion
around her, Miss Peters continued,
saying that singing Zerlina in
"Don Giovanni" was one of her
favorite roles because it was her
debut in 1950. "I also liked the
part of Lucia in "Lucia di Lam-
mermoor," she said. "During the
Mad Scene one is singing alone
on stage for about 18 minutes ...
it is very challenging to me to
sing it."
"One of my desires is to take
courses in philosophy and litera-
ture some day," said the petite
singer. She was privately tutored
in languages, ballet and dramatics,
as well as voice, after her gradua-
tion from junior high school.
Although she has sung many
times in Europe, Miss Peters has
never studied there. "I have al-
ways wanted to be a coloratura,
because my voice was very high,"
she explained with a smile.
Proper Teacher Important
"The important thing for any-
one who wants to sing," Miss
Peters enthusiastically commented
as she leaned forward, "is to get
the right teacher ... someone who
will truthfully tell you if you have
talent and are expressing it cor-
rectly; someone who will be a
good guide." She found this guide
in William Hermann, a New York

voice teacher to whom her parents
took her when she was 13.
Miss Peters talked eagerly about
her training in New York, her
native city, and her young son,
John Adam Fields. "If you would
like to see him, I 'just happen' to
have a picture," she said with a
light laugh. Immediately she pul-
led from her purse a small book
full of baby picture-s.
In the spring of 1952 she star-
red in the movie "Tonight We
Sing" filmed in Hollywood. "Mak-
ing a movie was a new experience
for me. The hours were early and
long and it was difficult singing
to a box (the size of which she
approximated with her hands) in-
stead of to a live audience."
Last night's concert was the first

on Miss Peters' tour. From here
she went to Wheaton, Ill., and will
return to New York to appear on
the Voice of Firestone program
Monday night. Two concerts are
next on her agenda. She will then
appear in the opening of the sea-
son at the Metropolitan Opera as
Gilda in "Rigoletto."
Besides this role, which she has
played before, Miss Peters ap-
peared in "Romeo and Juliet,"
"The Barber of Seville," and
"Fledermaus." She also has learned
the coloratura roles in the operas
"Puritani," "Fra Diavolo," "Di-
norah" and "Hamlet."
In 1950 she was chosen to sing
the leading role in one of the
Festival of Britain's major musical
events, the production of Balfe's
"The Bohemian Girl."

-Daily-Robert Kanner
NEW DIMENSIONS-Showing a strong similarity to aerial photo-
graphs of the Middle West prairie lands is Enrico Donate's
"Kabara." Visitors to the exhibit can compare this and other
paintings with photographs of the natural forms.

Another Note on Extracurricular Competence .. .
HOW TO HANDLE
BIG WEEKENDS
Rose Bowl bound? (We hope!) Big date for a big
weekend?
There's an easy way to demonstrate all the poise and
aplomb of a seasoned world traveler and raconteur.
Use Ann Arbor Bank Travelers Checks.
Wherever you go, Travelers Checks bring a happy glint
to the eye, immediately establish you as sound and reliable.
They're just as convenient as cash itself.
Best of all, you're absolutely protected against loss or
theft.
Before you set out on your trip, stop in at either near-
campus branches of Ann Arbor Bank to discover all the
advantages of Travelers Checks. You'll be glad you did!

hip - -- - - - _ -- -_ _- jai

1111

"Your Best Bet - Call A Vet"
VETERAN'S CAB
NO 3-4545 NO 2-4477 NO 3-5800
SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports
We Go Anywhere 24-Hour Service

Come to INDIA ART SHOP
I) for beautiful and rare imports.
9v
JEWELRY SILK SCARFS
EMBROIDERED BAGS IVORY PORCELAIN
PRINTED and HANDWOVEN BEDSPREADS
and many other fine pieces.c
Subscribe to
The Michigan Daily
COLUMmBIA L.P.
DOLLAR DIVIDEND
Save 1.0
JOHNNY MATHIS
"Swing Softly"
RAY CONNIFF
"Concert in Rhythm"
Now 12.98
Reg. $3.98

1

elephants never forget
\1

Engineers, Physicists
Mathematicians
NAA's On-Campus Interviews
OCTOBER 8, 9'
-a'The NAA industrial family has a career for you:
Atomics International Division puts the atom to work
a for power and research in America and abroad. i
a Autonetics Division makes automatic control systems *
* for manned aircraft and missiles. Pioneered in space *
navigation... built inertial guidance system for USS I
v Nautilus and Skate. I
Columbus Division designed and is building the Navy's
most advanced carrier-borne weapon system, the A3J .
Vigilante, and the most versatile jet trainer, the T2J.
Los Angeles Division is the home of next-generation
! mamnne.d weapn sysvtems-the B-970 anid F109a2...nd

THIS IS JOAN

Bewitching, not bothered or bewildered
as she relaxes comfortably outside

I

I

her shop in the perfect car coat.
Weather proofed poplin,
hooded in knit, quilt/lined;
it's a gem for hiking or biking.
Beige, brown or red ... $25.

I

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