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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 19, 1958 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
HEADQUARTERS IN MODERN BUILDING:

Press Publishes Many Scholarly Works at 'U'

OH PLEASE-Registration at the University is a mechanical
process in which it seems no amount of pleading can help any
student get into a class which has the "filled" trademark-in-
scribed upon it. To the bewildered freshman trying not to be
stuck with a noon English 23 class through to the most aloof
senior who "absolutely will not take a Saturday class under any
circumstances," the process is one of the constant heart failure
until all classes are duly recorded.

By KATHLEEN MOORE
The University Press is a Uni-
versity department concerned
with scholarly publishing.
The University Press annually
publishes a wide variety of books.
Books written by scholars which
appeal to the general public, and
books written by scholars for use
of fellow-scholars in highly-
specialized fields of interest ap-
pear regularly on its publications
list.
New Quarters in 1956
Before the University Press
moved into its present quarters,
a modern building at 412 May-
nard completed in the spring of
1956, its offices were scattered
around the campus: in the Gen-
eral Library, the Rackham Build-
ing, and in an old building on
Maynard Street.
The Press now shares its quar-
ters with the Official Publica-
tions Office, which issues all of-
ficial bulletins including the Time
Schedule used by students during
registration and the Publications
Distribution Service which
handles the billing, shipping, and
accounting for all publishing de-
partments on campus.
Preparing Comprehensive History
The University Press is current-
ly preparing the publication of a
comprehensive history of the
modern world. Four of the 15
volumes dealing with practically
every area In the world will be re-
leased this fall. They are "Latin
America: A Modern History," by
J. Fred Rippy; "Russia and the
Soviet Union: A Modern History,"
by Warren B. Walsh; "The Near
East: A Modern. History," by Wil-
liam Yale; and "The Far East: A
Modern History," by Nathaniel
Peffer.
The other 11 volumes in the set
will be released during the next
three years. When finished the
University's history of the modern
world, written by leading his-
torians, will provide Americans
with a"firm grasp of their (other
nations') historical past" accord-
ing to Allan Nevinsco-editor.
Salk Vaccine
Reaffirmed
Prof. Gordon C. Brown of the
School of Public Health reaf-
firmed yesterday the potency and
safety of the Salk polio vaccine.
Referring to the polio outbreak
in Detroit, Prof. Brown said, "The
record of the vaccine is good in
this current epidemic. The serious
cases have not been completely
vaccinated."!
The professor is one'of. a group
studying the viruses which caused
this outbreak. He revealed many
of the non-paralytic cases which
outwardly have the appearance of
poliomyelitis are actually being
caused by viruses other than
polio, including mumps.
"The other viruses are so simi-
lar that it is impossible to make
a clinical differentiation between
them and polio," Prof. Brown
said.
"It is not surprising so many
people are hospitalized even
though they have had the three
shots," the professor continued.
"Polio vaccine does not prevent
these other diseases."
Of those cases which turned
out to be polio, the majority of
the people did not have any shots
at all, Prof. Brown noted. "There
hasn't been a single confirmed
case of polio in a completely vac-
cinated person - one having had
all three shots," he said.

RADIO .RADI
1290
CLASSICAL DIXIE
JAZZ POPULAR
(Pleasant Listening)

'.

UNIVERSITY PRESS-The building above was opened in 1956 to house the University Press offices
which were scattered about campus. Publishing many scholarly textbooks, highly specialized books,
and general interest books, the Press shares its quarters with the Official Publications Office.'

0

MiKey McHigan
for the best in
" Associated Press Wire
i Campus News
0 Sports
0=Local and State News
* University's
Daily Official Bulletin
* National and
International News
0 Nationally Known Columnists
" Fashions
Subscribe to
PhoneNO 2324-1
On.
4E

Gross sales of the University
Press amounted to more than
$200,000 last year. Two recently
established series have had a.
bearing on the sharp rise in sales:
The Ann Arbor Paperbacks be-
gan to appear three years ago. All
the boolts in this series are re-
prints of intellectual boks of in-
terest to students and the general
public.
New Science Series
The other series, the Ann Ar-
bor Science Library, begun last
fall, deals with specific areas in
the field of science. Written for

the general reader by leading sci-
entists, its topics range from a
study of "The Senses" by Wolf-
gang von Buddenbrock to a study
of the tides in "Ebb and Flow" by
Albert Defant.
Among the books written for a
highly specialized audience are
the "Middle English Dictionary"
edited by Hans Kurath which has
been in preparation for 30 years.
The work, which is published in
many parts, is useful only to ex-
perts in Middle English. v
H. Ashley Weeks, of the Uni-
versity business administration
school, is author of another very

specialized book, "Youthful Of-
fenders at Highfields." The book
is a survey of the effects of a new
sort of psychology in the treat-
ment of juvenile delinquents, and.
is useful to scholars in the field.
The University Press publishes
a vast variety of scholarly books
of all types. Many, including the
forthcoming "Religion - and the
State University" by. Erich Wal-
ter, provide both interesting and
informative reading for the gen-
eral public, and. specific informa-
tion for study by scholars in the
author's particular area of com-
petence.

1

PETITIONS NOW AVAILABLE

for

SENIOR POSITIONS
on the GARGOYLE

announces.
200 SUBSCRIPTIONS. OPEN. FOR THE 19559SRE

-Daiy-ric Arnold
THE LINEUP--To registration workers, students and faculty alike,
students soon lose any individuality they might possess until
anything which moves would automatically be identified as a
student, be it man or beast. For three and a half days students file
In and out of Waterman gymnasium. In with a sheaf of white
Bards, out with either a sad or glad heart. The very last to file
out are the workers t iemselves. There is no doubt what their
feelings are: "Glad it's all over," they cry in unison-till next
year anyway.

Today 4:30

Gargoyle Office

III

420 Maynard
Student Publications Building

FOOTWEAR
108 EAST WASHINGTON

Sept. 29: THE BICYCLE THIEF (dir. by Vit-
torio De Sica, italy, 1949); and THE
QUIET ONE (documentary, prod. by Sid-
ne' Meyer and Janet Loeb, U.S., 1948)
Oct. 6: THE BATTLESHIP POTEMKIN (dir.
by Eisenstein, Russia, 1925); KINO-
PRAVDA and KOMBRIG IVANOV (prod.
by the Kino-Eye group, Russia, 1922)
Oct. 20: LATALANTE (dir. by Jean Vigo,
France, 1934); and GOYA (with music by
Vincente Gomez)
Nov. 24: VOLPONE (with Harry Bour and
Louis Jouvet, France, 1939); and LOT IN
SODOM (experimental, France, 1934).
Dec. 1: THE ETERNAL REyURN (story anid
dial. by Jean Cocteau, France, 1943); and
THE PLOW THAT BROKE THE PLAINS
(documentary, dir, by Pare Lorentz, U.S.,
1936)
Jan. 5: THE ASPHALT JUNGLE (dir, by John
Huston, U.S., 1950); and THE LOON'S
NECKLACE (Amer. Indian Legend, Canada,;
1949)

Feb. 9: THE PASSION OF JOAN OF ARC
-(dir. by Carl Dreyer, France, 1927); and
SONG OF CEYLON (documentary, prod. by
John Grierson, British, 1935)
Feb. 23: THE STARS LOOK DOWN (dir. by
Carol Reed, with Michael Redgrave, British,
1939); and UEBERFALL (dir. by Erno
Metzner, German, 1929)
Mgrch 9: DECISION BEFORE DAWN (dir.
by Anatole Litvak, U.S., 1952)
April 27: CARNIVAL IN- FLANDERS - LA
KERMESSE HEROIQUE (with Francoise
Rpsay and Louis Jouvet, France, 1936);
and EXTASE (with Hedy Lamarr, Czech,
1933)
May 4: To be announced
May 11: DISTANT JOURNEY - GHETTO
TEREZIN (dir. by Alfred Radok, Czech,
1950); and EASY STREET (Chaplin,
1917)

MUEHLIG &LANIPHEAR
Hardware and Paints
STUDENT SUPPLIES - Wastebaskets,
clothes-bars, extension cords . . .
HOUSEWARES OF ALL TYPES
Clothes hampers, wash baskets -
311 South Mpin ... NO 2-3277... Ann Arbor

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ALL SHOWINGS are at 8:00 p.m., Monday evenings, in the Rackham
Amphitheatre. Admission is by membership subscription only. A subscription'
for the entire series of 12 programs costs $5.00; the cost is prorated for late
joiners. Send check or money order to Hal Slater, GOTHIC FILM SOCIETY,
434 South, Main St., Ann Arbor. For information, call Normandy 2-6685.

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