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September 19, 1958 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-19

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I'

THE MICHIGAN DAILY _y

UE tl

DURING SUMMER CONGRESS:
Fundamental Rights of Student Press Demanded by NSA

By JOAN KAATZ
A declaration of the fundamen-
tal rights of the student press was
proposed and passed at the United
States National Student Associa-
tion (USNSA) Congress held this
summer.
Delegates at the meeting at
Ohio Wesleyan University in Dela-
ware, Ohio, further condemned any
interference with the privileges of
the student press. The resolution,
drawn up by the Student Editorial
Affairs Conference, demanded that
the student newspaper be free from
control by administration, student
organizations, financial supporters
and ecclesiastical agencies.
Recommend Easing of Rules
The Editorial conference also
drew up a proposal recommending
a relaxation of classification rules
on government information: The
motion, which was passed, con-
tended that too much material

was being classified because of
bureaucratic fears rather than the
needs of national security.
During the ten day conference
the South Carolina delegation in-
troduced a resolution upholding
segregation in educational institu-
tions, denouncing the Supreme
Court's ruling, and condemning
the use of force in maintaining
segregation.
The proposal which at first was
almost kept completely off the,
floor, ended in strong defeat.
Suggest Counselor Program
A student counselor program in
conjunction with faculty counsel-
ing for freshmen was also recom-
mended, by the Congress. The pro-
posal was passed on the rationale
that the student counselor is in
closer contact with the freshman
and therefore can give him greater

attend the World Youth Festival
to be held in Vienna next summer
becauise of the Festival's red-tinted
nature. However, at the same time,
it did not discourage any American
student who desired to attend the
Festival for information purposes
and will upon request furnish
many students with an explana-
tion of the NSA position toward
the Festival.
The delegates reaffirmed its
position condemning the French
people'for their continued practice
of imperialism and discrimination
in Algeria, ,particularly Algeria's
educational system.
Urge Hostility Halt
The proposal urged immediate
cessation of hostilities and called
for the establishment of the inde-
pendent state of Algeria.'
Eleanor Roosevelt spoke to the
Congress during one evening on
the topics of the world situation
and. the challenge of the future.
She said the United States must.
show initiative and self-discipline
in order to illustrate Democracy
at work.
Frank Grahma, former senator
from North Carolina and now as-
sociated with the United Nations,
spoke on his foreign travels as a
United Nations observer.
One evening was occupied by a

discussion of educational institu-
tions in Russia between Peter Eck-
stein, '58, former Daily editor, and
Pete Eckles of Dartmouth College.
Both students participated in an
exchange program of student edi-
tors between Russia and the
United States last spring.
Eckstein. commented on the uni-
formity of intellectual opinion:
among students in-Russia. He was
impressed by the way students
identified with Russia's national
purpose to give their life meaning.
Eckles stressed the informality
of the students and the manner
in which they live in a circum-
scribed area of thought...
Reuther Unable To Attend
Walter Reuther, United Auto
Workers president, was scheduled
to speak at the Congress but was
unable to attend. He was replaced
by Al Lowenstein, former NSA
president,
Lowenstein spoke on the Middle
East, Africa, and Russia. He com-
mented on the psychic of the Rus-
sian people. He said the Russian
people now have hope since Stalin.
died. They believe they only have;
war to fear and that war will come,
from the United States.
The Congress was attended by
delegates from all regions of the
country as well as many State .

assistance.
The USNSA

again declined toI

U

Department observers and foreign
observers.
University delegates included
Larry Soloman, '61, coordinator of
NSA on campus; Mort Wise, '59,
chairman of the delegation; Dick
Erby, '60; David Kessel, Grad.;
Sue Rockne, '60; "Maurice Zilber,
'60; Robert Arnove, '59; Scot
Chrysler, '59; Carol Holland, '60;
Peterr Eckstein, '58, former Daily
editor; and Richard Taub, '59,.
Daily editor,
Reports by the South American
observers suggested that American
students study the socio-economic
conditions of the Latin countries
so as to be better equipped to deal
with South American problems.
The resolutions of the Congress
were presented after five daya of
meetings held by sub-commissions
of the four major committees of
NSA. The four primary committees
are international affairs, student
government, educational affairs,
and student affairs:
All resolutions not passed upon.
the general congress were left. t,
the action of the National Execu-
tive Committee, composed of the,
chairman and vice-chairman of
each region.
Garbage!
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. () -
City Commissioner J. T. Wag-
goner, host to a garbage dumlip
tea party yesterday, was ac-
cused of committing a. legal
faux pas today.
Waggoner gave the- party in
an effort to prove that the
dump is odorless and sanitary.
Wearing a ;light tan suit and,
bright smile, he welcomed
samne 35 well-dressed guests.
Mrs. Margaret Dreyfus, city
beautification chairman,:
potired.: While the event was
officially a tea party, coffee,
eakes and small sandwiches
were served.

on Braun
To' Lecture
On Scinene
Dr. Wernher von Braun, devel-
oper'of the Jupiter C missile, will
speak Monday at 8:30 p.m. in the
Masonic auditorium in Detroit.
Dr. von Braun will speak on
"The Three S's-Science, Study,
and Selection." The first earth
satellite, Explorer I, was placed in'
orbit by von Braun's Jupiter C
missiler ,
Von Braun is director of the
Development Operations Division
of the Army Ballistic Missile
agency. During World War II he
was a German missileexpert and
played a large role in the develop-
ment.of the feared German V-2
Rocket wheh blitzed London dur-
ing the war.
{
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes, no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN. form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 19, 1958
VOL. LXVIII, No. 4
General Notices
The Audio-Visual Education Center
formerly located at 4028 Admin. Bldg.
has moved to a new location in the
Frieze Bldg., 720 E. Huron St. Tele-
phone numbers are University exten-
sions 2664, 2665, 2666.
Academic Notices

Diot Weekday
64167 and 9 P
FERNAN DEL
in
"The Shee Has Five Legs"
and
"Mr. HultsHldy

VS

PM

SIR JOHN GIELGUD

ELEANOR ROOSEVELT

HILL AUDITORIUM

Outs nding PLATFORM ATTRACTIONS

1958
- 1959

REDUCED PRICES TO STUDENTS!

Nov. 13 MARGARET WEBSTER
Margaret Webster is one of the most outstanding
figures in the American theatre today. She is an
actress of note, a well-known adthor, and one of
our' finest directors. Appearing here in' a dramatic
recital, she will introduce on her program some- of
Shaw's famous gallery of extraordinary women,
ranging from Eve to Eliza Doolittle and from Major
Barbara to St., Joan.
PICTURES FROM A SHAVIAN GALLERY
Jan. 16 EDDIE DOWLING
Eddie Dowling is one of the oil-time greats of the
entertainment world. He has been an outstanding
success in every phase of show business-vaudeville,
musical comedy, drama, producer, director and play-
wright. He has enriched the theatre by bringing to
the spotlight the challenging works of such young
playwrights as Tennessee. Williams and William
Saroyan.
FROM SHAKESPEARE TO SAROYAN
Feb. 20 SIR JOHN GLUBB
The small, courogeous Englishman known as Glubb
Pasha is almost as legendary in the Mid-East as
lawrence of Arabia. For fifteen years head of the
Arab Legion; Gen. .Glubb is celebrated for his wide
knowledge of Arab custom and dialects. Though
often partial to the Arabs, he feels that the Middle
East is essential for the survival of the British Em-
pire.
A SOLDIER WITH THE ARABS
Mar. 13 NORMAN COUSINS
Michigan students have sought for years to bring
Norman Cousins to the campus. A distinguished
author and the brilliant editor of the "Saturday
Review," Mr. Cousins long has been concerned with
the moral, political and social conditions which affect
the problem of human growth and the individual
free man. He is a favorite figure of American
college students.
THE WAR AGAINST MAN

EDDIE bOWLING

ANTHONY NUTTING

. $5.00
.. $4.00

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