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September 18, 1958 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WELCOME to ANN ARBOR
"Your Best Bet-Call A Vet"
VE TEAN'S CAB

Russell Urges Creation
Of Education Commitee

IN LOCAL CONTESTS:
Primary Results Revi

6

(Continued from Page 1)

NO 3-4545

N 2-4477

NO 3-5800,

SERVICE TO
WILLOW RUN and WAYNE MAJOR Airports

j

We Go Anywhere

24-hour Service

,
U!

state agencies on all policy mat-
ters" concerning the, development
and operation of higher education
in the state.
Give Advice
4) Give advice on school prob-
lems to college and university of-
ficials.
5) Make continuing studies of
Medical Clinic
Talks Attract
Many Students

11

1600'

H R

1600

Clinic conferences at the Uni-
versity's Medical Center draw
hundreds. of students a year-*for
discussions of cases, treatments
and techniques, according to the
Medical Center.
The discustions, which carry no
academic credit, are an outgrowth
of the clinic conferences tradi-
tionally held in hospitals and
clinics throughout the world.
Most of the more than 140 such

ANN ARBOR'S DYNAMIC VOICE

Joe Gentile and
Ralph Binge

for

I

7:05-9

A.M.

"OLLI E'S
CARAVAN"
9 P.M.-1 A.M.
STEVE
FILIPIAK
3 P.M.-6:30 P.M.

NEWS

WEATHER'',

DON HERMAN
News Editor
The "HEADLESS
HORSEMAN"
Beautiful Carl & Sharp Frank
Morri ge is a Living Death)
(Aswinging Cat)
6:45 P.M.
Monday thru Friday
VAN PATRICK
SPORTS
6:30 P.M.

i,
r

meetings, held weekly on campus,
are open to any physician who is
visiting campus and has a, pro-
fessional interest in the field.
Although most of the visiting'
physicians are from Michigan,
visitors also often come from for-
eign countries.

Subscribe

the state's needs for higher educa-
tion and of the effectiveness of
the programs now maintained by
the schools.
6) Have:the authority to make
test checks and audits of institu-
tional records to insure the ac-
curacy and uniformity of the re-
ports that are made to it.
No Interfering
However the coordinating board
should be given no authority to
interfere with the internal ad-
ministration of any state college
or university, Russell said. He
listed under "internal administra-
tion" such matters as the employ-
ment of personnel, requirements
for degrees, the admission of stu-
dents and similar matters.,
The individual college board
would be able to propose major
program developments, subject to
the recommendation of the co-
ordinating board and the approval
of the Legislature. ,.
The coordinating board would
have a membership of from four
to nine, and, would be appointed
by the governor and the Legisla-a
ture, Russell outlines.
Has Experience
Russell has had considerable
experience with coordination sys-
tems in higher education.
For the past six years, Russell
has been the chief {executive of
the state-wide coordinating board'
of higher education in New Mexico.
He has also been a member of the
Conference of Executive Officers
of State-wide Boards of Higher
Education.
Publication of Russell's. report
as a legislative staff study does not
imply endorsement of the legisla-
tive higher education study com-
mittee.
Other Suggestions
Other major recommendations
were:
1) Creation of a community
college board, to exercise state-
level supervision over the com-
munity college program in Michi-,
gan.
2) Creation of a separate board
of control for each of the four
institutions now under the state
board of education--Central Mich-
igan College, Eastern Michigan
College, Northern Michigan Col-
lege and Western Michigan' Uni-
versify.
3) To allow every board of state
controlled institutionsk of higher
oduc'ation the same kind of con-
-stitutiohal authority for manage-
ment and control as the boards of
the University and Mlichigan State
University. No change was sug-
gested for the constitutional status
of the Regents and the State Board
of, Agriculture.

By JUDY DONER '
A surprise ending to the Wash-
tenaw County's sheriff - primary
provided the main excitement "in
the 'otherwise predictable August
5 local primary.
In the Republican primary,
George A. Peterson defeated in-
cumbent Sheriff' Robert E. A.
Lillie and Harry B. Hogan to suc-
cessfdlly climax a campaign in
which he sharply criticized opera-
tional changes in the Willow Vil-
ldge sub-station, which is now used
prilnarily for drivers' licenses and
the theft of money from a sheriff's
department fund.
Peterson called the reorganiza-
tion "a fantastic error of Judge-
ment which will leave the Ypsilanti
township with little police protec-
tion."
Oltersdorf Wins
In the Democratic race, Lawr-
ence P. Oltersdorf won his fifth
opportunity to run for office of
sheriff, defeating Richard Wil-
liams, Thomas A. Fitzgerald and
Leon. E. Willoughby.
Oltersdorf maintained that the
whole sheriff's department was in
need of, "a total and complete re-
organization" and uiged the adop-
tion of a Civil Service system of
personnel.competition.
Incumbent Sen. Lewis Christ-
man (R - Ann Arbor) defeated
Beth W. Milford to overwhelmingly
win the Republican nomination for
the Washtenaw County seat in the
State Senate.
Law Was Unopposed
He will run against O. Thomas
Law, who was unopposed in the
pemocratic primary, 'in the Noa
vember election.
Attacked by his opposition spe-
cifically on the recent University
budget cuts, and on his abstention
on the first budget proposal, Sen.
Christman claimed that "although
the need is here, the money simply
is not."
"The University wanted a cer-
tain amount," he explained, "but
DAILY
.OFFICIAL.
- BULLETIN
(Continued from Page 4)
Niagara Blower Co., New York, N.Y.,
has several opening in various parts
of the U.S. for experienced Sales En-
gineers who have the following qai-
cal Engineering. Several years exp. in
selling mechanical equipment to in-
dustry. Willing to locate at one of the
large industrial centers in the U.S.
after a brief period of training In N.Y.
Preferred age 30-45 yrs.. Opportunities
in this field are unlimited.
Joe Martin Co., Inc., Detroit, is
looking for an Engineer. Structural or
Architectural Engineer, no degree
necessary. Exp. helpful in electricity,
transfer of materials, conveying, fire-
brick or refractory, plus structural
steel.
For further information concerning
the above positions, contact the Bureau
of Appointments,- 3528 Admn., Ext.
3371.
NOTICE:
The.Foreign Service Officer examina-
tion for, officers of Class 8, annually
held in December, has been Canceled
for this year. As planned now, the next
examination will be held in Dec., 1959.

MUSIC
SPORTS

REP. GEORGE SALLADE
... Re-nominated
so. did others. And state revenues
were down." Because of this situa-
tion, he said, the Republican ma-
jority decided they had "better
tread lightly this year," and keep
.appropriations near the expected
revenue amount.
Remedy in Planning

to

Law thought that the remedy to Age
the University's budget problems ant .
were in terms of "planning on the Repul
basis of the state's budget. A had,]
reduction of state spending would. attor.
not have been disproportional," defeat
he indicated, "but such cuts should mary
have been shifted away from high- The
er education. onlya

0

Maurice J. Hoffman, who was
opposed in the Democratic
mary.
Bowling, financial secretar
Carpenters Local No. 512, was
feated in his second attemp
win the GOP nomination over
Warner.
Predicts Fee Increase
Charged by Bowling thatt
versity groups in this area are
being properly represented ir
legislature," Rep. Warner pred
a University fee increase.
"The University got as r
this year as the Legislaturec
possibly give it," Rep. Wa
maintained. "I am pleased we
able to do as well as we did."
Rep. George Meader (R-M
ran' unopposed for his own se
his party's -primary. Hisd e
cratic oppositioi In the Noven
elections,'Robert G. Hall, afsc
alone.
In the November contest
Prosecuting Attorney, Repuh
William Ager will face Demo
Robert M. Gillespie.
Ager defeated John W.
while Gillespie was victorious
Morris E. Popkins.

Running for Ann Arbor's first
district seat in the State. House of
Representatives, Rep. Sallade ' is
the GOP incumbent and will op-
pose Mrs. Hodesh, the Democratic
candidate, . in the November elec-
tion. Both were unopposed in the
primary.
Rep. Sallade intends to con-
centrate on supporting higher edu-
cation, labor and minority groups
in his campaign. "I will run
strictly on my record,"' he said.
Outlines Issues
Mrs. Hodesh, outlined the gen-
eral issues -of her campaign as
related to the national recession
and thei state's need to raise more
funds.
In Ypsilanti, State Representa-.
tive James F. Warner. won an easy
victory over William E, Bowling'
in the second district race for the
Republican nomination to face

Frank
coron
Georg

ney from 1944-46, then
Aed' in the Republican
in 1952;
e race for coroner ,was
on the Republican side, .
k G. Steffan, the incun
er was defeated by
e C. tink.
Noprisan Elcto

The

Court Commissioner, Robe
Fink and Jack G. Garris; bot
cimbents, are the candidal
the November election. Then
no other contestants in the
mary for this office.
In uncontested Democratic
tions, the results were: C
Clerk, Ethel Brown; County'T
urer, Garvin J. Brasseur; Re
of Deeds, Alice Hayes; Drain
missioner;Edward L. Jonas
Surveyor, William G. Lantern
Their counterparts on' the
publican side were: County C
Luella Smith; County Treas
William F(. Verner; Regist
Deeds, Patricia Hardy; -Drain
missioner, John Flook and
veyor; Robert S. HIcks.

-Top ofYour Radio Dial

Michigan

.
_r

1600

WHRYIX

1600

Daily,

i i

EARN'
IN SPARETI-ME
A large number of people will be needed dur-
ing the coming sernester to be subjects in a vari-
ety of psychological experiments. You will be paid
$1.00 an hour, and may take part in several
experiments, each of which may take from one,
to ten, hours schedule'd at your convenience-.

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