100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

September 18, 1958 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1958-09-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIAE MICNIGAN DAILY

EPORT CLAIMS:
rieans View Science Favorably

4-

Most Americans feel that while
science "makes our way of life'
change too fast" it also makes life
easier and is a major reason for,
rapid progress, Robert Davis of
the University Survey Research
Center; said recently.
Speaking before a meeting of
the American Psychological Asso-
ciation, Davis reported that nearly,
all adults believe science can in-
crease understanding of human
behavior.
A majority of persons,interview-
ed by Davis and his staff for the
National Association of Science
Writers. expressed concern. over
atomic war and other items.
However, Davis reported the
public has no, clear notion of who
is. responsible for the atomic crisis.
Scientists, politicians, and "evil
people" not otherwise identified
were blamed, as well as "foreign.
powers," "economically powerful
people," and "military people."
The "vague and uncertain way"
in which the public placed blame
-for atomic problems led Davis to
believe that scientists are no more
used as scape-goats than any other
groups.
The survey showed that, when

asked about the personal char-
acteristics of scientists, about three
.in four mention positive traits-
particularly intelligence, education,
and dedication to work. About one
in six people described scientists
as "normal," or "not different from
average."
One in five mentioned negative
traits, centering around social
ineptitude and mild eccentricity.
Ideological deviance was scarcely
mentioned, and out of 1,919 per-
sons interviewed, Only one raised
the issue of political deviance by
scientists.
Blackwell Gets
Nw Position
A University professor of . psy-
chology was recently appointed
director of the Institute for Re-
search in Vision at Ohio' State
University.'
Assoc. Prof. H. Richard Black-
well, a faculty nember here-since
1945, he had headed the Univer-
sity's Vision Research Laboratories.
since 1946.

When asked what they thought

scientists liked about being sci-
entists, most mentioned such fac-
tors as "discovery," "meeting the
challenge of the unknown," "social
value of their work" and "intel-
lectual satisfaction." .
Davis listed several "important.
points" which emerged from the.
data:
1) The'public sees the scientists
as motivated primarily by Intel-
lectual interests.
2) The scientist is seen as being
attracted to his work by :its in-
trinsic' properties, rather than by
its economic or prestige rewards.
3) Ninety per cent of the people
believe most scientists want to
work on things that will make life
better for the average person.
4) More than half feel that sci-
entists should. work on under-
standing nature or anything that.
interests them, even if it has no
immediate practical-value.
5) As long as the scientist's dedi-
cation -Is directed toward socially
acceptable ends, "being different"
may be seen as merely a fact, not
the basis for fear or suspicion.

Report Says
Patients Use
More, Drug
Hospital patients take more
medicine, have fewer surgical
operations and more babies, and
are staying in hospitals a shorter
length of time than ever before,
according to a summer report -by
the University Medical Center.
The report covered the Center's.
activities during the fiscal year
ending June.30.
Dr. Albert Kerlikowske, director,
announced that the average length
of stay of patients admitted reach-
ed a new low of 11.8 days, as com-
pared to 12.23 days the previous
year and an average of, 16.8 days
ten years ago.
The total number of patients
also declined slightly. During the
past year, 20,487 persons entered
the University Hospital compared
with 20,963 last year. -'
Kerlikowske attributed the re-
duction in length of stay to rapid
advancements in medical science.
"New drugs, faster diagnoses and
'improved methods -of treatment
enable modern medicine to speed
cures fors.patients," he said.

Researchers Study Traits
Of sChool Group Leaders
4

"Say

A team of three University re-
searchers have concluded that boys
having "highly coercive" parents
plus much personal frbedom often
assume roles as group ,leaders
among school children. ,
The researchers, Lois Hoffman,
Sidney Rosen, and Ronald Lippitt
of the Research Center for Group
Dynamics, drew their results from
a survey of 200 Detroit grade
schoolers.
They found that those boys who
had coercive parents and a wide1
degree of freedom were character-
ized by several traits.

Have You

Seen

the

They made more attempts to
influence their classmates, were
more direct in their approach, and
more successful in their influence
attempts.
In addition, the boys were more
active as' group leaders, showed'
higher scholastic performance,
demonstrated more'active friendli-
ness, and were better liked.
In the survey, parents were con-
sidered coercive if they were iden-
tified by their children with such
verbs as "punishes," "threatens,"
or "hits."

Mister,

Latiest in
WHEELS?
They got all the styles

and shapes-fit just for

you

.; . .

WITHAM DRUG Co.

at

601 S. FOREST, Cor. S. University

NO 3-4119

STUDENT BICYCLE

DEPENDABLE PRESCRIPTION SERVICE
Drugs - Cosmetics - Baby Supplies
State Liquor Distributor --lce Cold Beer - Wine
Champagne - Party Supplies

SHOP
1319 So. University

NO 8-6927

OPERATED BY FRiENDLY

STUDENTS

p to

:

I

SPEEDEE-

SPARKLING

low
.0

.
f ' r . .
r ,4 : r{ ,,,,
1j 3
4
} .r t
:. v
k'

/

Drive-In Service

. ,
.. .. ' !1
~ ,::..
. ..
/
'
A ..
,.
, ..,.:.
,.-
<.. t

r, '
t
; ',
-...

I_

Sold over 50 Million

Big Triple Thick
MILK SHAKE

HA

BURGERS

Crisp-Tender

t k
J

Delicious

d

4

I

i

Tany-Juicy-100% Government Inspeded
OUR VOLUME MEANS YOUR SAVING

Only 15c

A Bagful of Fries
Served Hot and Tasty

One Pint of Pleasure

20c

Also Serving Root Beer Coke -Orange Drink - Milk

lOc

2000 West Stadium

C

2000 West St

Aj

1

,.

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan