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May 09, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-09

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'59 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Pershing Rifles Conduct NightExercise

Northcott Comments
(I ~h 4~~wa- N d WiI

The Reservists regrouped and
counter-attacked the position of
the Pershing Rifles.
The exercise was the climax of
one week of special schooling for
the Pershing Rifles. The instruc-
tion took place this week and in-
volved squad tactics, very high
frequency radio communications,
and safe handling of small arms.
.'.Ivy League'
Complex Hit
'ByJohnston
{ y
The whole country is suffering
frfom "Ivy-League psychosis and
not realizing that a fine education
can be obtained at any number of
smaller colleges, the president of
the national College Advisory Bu-
reau charged in a national maga-
zine this week.
Robert .W. Johnston urged the'
Rifles staged a practice exercise 135,000 high school seniors who
vists based in Detroit. One squad took college board examinations
a light machine gun in addition last week to carefully inspect the
possibilities of smaller schools.
Academically, there are very few
"cow-colleges" any more.
Rifles and, Springfields and the "Ivy-League psychosis" has
third was a rifleman squad. Their brought about the unbalance,"
combined objective was to capture Johnston said. The biggest and
the "enemy" position a hill de- best-known schools are snowed
fended by the Reservists, under with applications, while
The three squads advanced many execellent schools are ac-
through a wooded area. Rifle tively seeking bright students," he
shots from snipers (Marine Re- added.
servists) and ambushes slowed The magazine's survey of 15
their advancement. The Pershing smaller colleges revealed fall, 1959,
Rifles Drill Team Commander, openings for about 500 students.
Army Cadet Lt. Tom Hutchinson "The far-flung small colleges
deployed his squads until they are without exception eager to
successfully penetrated the area. enroll students from a wide geo-
His men attacked the Marine po- graphical cross-cut," Johnston
sitio nand "captured" the hill. said.

PRACTICE - The Pershing R
lastinght with the Marine reser'
of the'Rifleswas equipped with,
to rifles.
By DAVID BLOOMGARDEN
The rifle shots and loud explo-
sions some people may have heard
last night weren't the aftermath
of a panty raid or initiation cere-
mony.
It was a night-time exercise
carried out by the University of
Michigan Pershing Rifles and the
Fifth Regiment of Marine Re-
servists based in Detroit.
The Pershing Rifles was com-
posed of three squads. One squad
was equipped with a light machine
gun in addtiion to rifles; the sec-
ond used Browning Automatic.

"t n LiUteUraItu
By SUSAN FARRELL
"The medieval literary conven-
tion of courtly love has had a tre-
mendous effect on man-woman
relationships."
Prof. Kenneth J. Northcott of
the University of Sheffield, Eng-
land, explained this statement on
the basis of medieval German
literature in a lecture recently.
The role of women in older lit-
eratures was considerably differ-
ent, he said. Romantic love was
thought to be madness and only
a joke.
Change Occurs
But a great change in literary
convention occurred about eight
centuries ago. Under the influence
of Spanish-Arabic l i t e r a t u r e,
Ovid's works, literature dedicated
to the blessed Virgin Mary, and
the social conditions of feudal so-
ciety, women were elevated to the
pedestal that they now seem to
occupy by right, Prof. Northcott
said.
The result was variously called
adulterous, heretical, and a means
for the enoblement of the human
spirit, he said.
The development of the lyric
poetry of courtly love had two
themes: service and physical ab-
stinence. The basis of the conven-
tion was that the woman was
married and unattainable, Prof.
Northcott explained. The knight
Union Makes
T Day Plans
For Visitors
The seventeenth annual Uni-
versity Day will be held today for
2,000 students from 150 high
schools.
The purpose of this affair is to
give prospective University stu-
dents an idea of the atmosphere
surrounding the University of
Michigan, and toward this end
the University Affairs Committee
of the Michigan Union, in con-
junction with the Office of Ad-
missions has planned the program.
The day's activities begin at
8:30 a.m. when the visitors will
gather in Hill Auditorium to hear
the opening addresses by Vice-
President James A. Lewis, and
Sidney Straight, admissions coun-
sellor. These will be followed by
several campus tours and mock
lectures at 9:30.
At 11:15 tours will be conducted
through fraternity and sorority
houses and University residence
halls. Lunch may then be pur-
chased at the residence halls.
The afternoon's program will
begin with another 'assembly at
Hill Auditorium' where portions
of Musket, and Gilbert and Sul-
livan will be performed. Cy Hop-
kins, '59, will be the master of
ceremonies.
Open houses will be offered be-
tween 1:45 and 3 p.m. when the
visitors will assemble at the Union
Ballroom for a mixer which will
be followed by a coffee hour in
the Terrace Room. Officially the
program will be completed at this
time.
1(3DM 4! 1596J AiOUS
S3] OEQ- SS UIS3
S.L0H N3M VL 3
S dN MO N 3
N a 31101GI dN
'd AVI 38 S b3 0
3N~lb s haI S

s d a 3 3 2i N i
Ivlvilvlvy lVS

f ib- ov
wished only to serve her and
asked no more than a smile of
approbation.
Mention God
Mention of God in these poems
was not blasphemous, the lecturer
added. The love expressed was
modeled on 'the love of God for
the world. It was the true Chris-
tian ethic of loving without
counting the costs.
By the thirteenth century, the
lyric poetry of courtly love had
reached a state of sterility. Very
little idealism was left; content
was fossilized and banal, he ex-
plained.
Love was removed from a rare-
fied atmosphere and for the first
time brought down to a fruitful
reciprocal relationship between a
man and woman.
UN Serves
To Increase
Diplomacy
The United Nations serves as a
valuable supplement to tradition- #
al means of diplomacy - not as
a substitute for them, Prof. Inis
L. Claude Jr, of the political sci-
ence department, said Wednesday.
Addressing a morning session of
the University's 26th annual Adult
Education Institute, he called the
UN a promoter of "grass roots"
communication among the peoples
of the world.
But this is not its major contri-
bution to peace, Prof. Claude
stressed.
Instead, he suggested, the UN's
real value stems from the oppor-
tunities it gives statesmen to ae-
quire a realistic view of other
countries and the individuals with
whom they conduct diplomatic
negotiations.
"As statesmen learn through
give and take, foreigns policy be-
comes more rational on all sides,"
he said. "Thus, the UN helps to
reduce miscalculations."
The future of the UN depends
on who decides to use it for what
purposes," Prof. Claude,
Jo~urnalists
Initiate Seven
The undergraduate chapter of
Sigma Delta Chi, professional
journalism, fraternity, initiated
seven men recently.
They are William Bradford, '59;
Frank Dombrosky, '62; Fred Holt,
'59; David Lyon, '60; Douglas Mc-
Cormick, Grad.; James Seder, '61;
and Thomas Turner, '60.

I

LKRossWorD

No. 24

- , - -- Y

ACROSS
1. Canyou
stand it?.
5. I Remember
9. Concerning a
crazy mixed-up
rein
10. Start to erase
11. What Kools are
that the others
aren't
18. You're label
to be caught
14. Part of
a chain
15. Anagram
of hot sap
(non-Kool
smoker)
17. These are
the things
you want
20. Repent;
25. Most common
kind of bills
26. You'l get a
charge out
of this
27. Pork pals
28. Canine cuddlers
29. Fell, for
actress Audrey?
$1. They're
suited to
equine champs
38. Roger's partner
24. Rnweaal

DOWN
1. The psycholo-
gist's end
2. Girl found
in Manhattan
8. Larynx dweller?
4. This isn't many
5. am of
6. Spheres of
action,
7. They save face
8. A tree
12. He deals
in dahlias
and scenta
15. Items for
key people
16. Bazaar or Ferry
17. Make a
knight of
18. Compass point
19. Quarrelers
who spill blood?
21. Mrs. A. Lincoln,
nee-
22. Too confused,
this Indian
23. Egg's last name
24. Short for
an ensign
26. yhe gal and
guy you
left behind
28. Oscar with
barbs

1

2K

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6

7,

8I

~ARE YOU KaDL
ENOUGH 4TO
KRACK TN'4I?"

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33

40

3S
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44

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42
45

IL

hrs." "eg"' 80. Movie actress
fellow Marta
87. WhyK eats was 31. They can be
in debt? aerosol oratomie
88. This goes 32. Well, it's p
there and a thought SWITC 14 jM
that goes here 34. The most
40. Mal de - refreshingj
41. Kind of steady experience
42. What to in smoking
switch to 85m6. For cool
48. Kind of relief sm ke Kools
44.An insect 88. Airlines
relative?, 39. Philosophy's
45. French islands beginning
* As cool and clean as a breath of fresh air.
" Finest leaf tobacco...mild refreshing menthol -
and the world's most thorough tested filter !
" With every puff your mouth feels clean,
your throat refreshed!
Qmei1C0 0SMosehin
. I. L SORGLAR IzE KOOL WITHOUT FILTERI

w TO
MILD MENTHOL
KIN 0.5121
(ir . ;rte +r"y':4 '

-- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4

*1959, Brown* Wiliaisson Tobacco Corer

F

- jW

JOIN
THE
INTERNATIONAL BROTHER PROGRAM
Here is your opportunity to become an American Brother to an
International Student. You may build a lasting friendship while
helping him adjust to campus life. If you are interested, fill out
this form and send it to International Affairs Committee, Stu-
dent Offices, Michigan Union, Ann Arbor. For additional infor-

I
I
I
IHigh
Ann-A
I
'I
Hi,
I
I
I
I
j ~Many c
I
To fur
Sandat
I The M
to seir
I

School
krbor,

of you will today be deciding on your future. For some of you, this
will include a college career at the University of Michigan. College is
lerful experience with a chance to develope many new and old interests.
ther your interests in the fields of journalism, advertising, photography,
the same time have an opportunity to meet and work with others,

El mai can call tihe Mi ch oi n n1~ tdn fie.

Union Student Offices.

11

I

I III H

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