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May 06, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-05-06

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THE MICHIGAN, AL

TALLY

.......

Mary Tower, Panhel Ex-President,Surveys
Sorority System, Sees Need for Change

Engineering Council To Hold
Exhibits, Tours for Laymen

By PEGGY GRFENBERG
"I've been an office, office girl
for too long," she said as she en-
tered the Panhellenic office for
about the three hundredth time
in two years.
Suggesting that her picture be
taken outside, Mary Tower, '59,
ex-president of Panhellenic Asso-
ciation, said, "I'm always photo-
graphed at my desk. I could sit in
a tree and eat daisies," she added.
Referring to the previous re-
mark, Miss Tower noted she has
spent much of her four years at
the University in an office, to be
exact, that of Panhellenic.
She pledged Kappa Kappa
Gamma sorority during her first
term, and that February she was
elected to the presidency of Junior
Panhellenic. As a member of Pan-
helleic, Miss Tower has wbrked
under three presidents. She was
elected -second vice-president in
her junior year and served this
past year as president. As for her
knowledge, experience with and
understanding of this organiza-
tion, "She's been in Panhellenic
since the year '01," one 'of her
sorority sisters says.
Move Made Change
In discussing Panhellenic, and
she usuall does, Miss Tower not-
ed the change in outlook that she
has seen within her experience
with the group. "A combination
of moving out of the League in
1957 and into the SAB brought
about a change.
"As . the organizations moved
out of the League they became
somewhat independent of their
former ties." Previous to the
move, Miss Ethel McCormick had
coordinated the activities of all
the organizations. .
Prof. Lippitt
TO Keynote
Conference
Region 10 of the Washington
White House Conference on Chil-
dren and Youth will hold an all-
day meeting from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.
May 16 at Ann Arbor High School.
Prof. Willard Olson, dean of
the education school, will' deliver
the welcoming speech. Keynote
speaker is Prof. Ronald Lippitt,
program director of the group
dynamics research center.
The Michigan Youth Commis-
sion asked the state to start pre-
parations now for the 1960 White
House Conference, Mrs. Robert
McNamara, general chairman of
the regional conference, said.
The national conference is held
every 10 years to take stock -of
the circumstances and prospects
of the country's youth and to ad-
vance their future, she explained.
On the regional 'level, the con-
ference will make recommenda-
tions for serving youth through
schools, communities and various
agencies affecting young people,
Mrs. McNamrara continued.
Recommendations are presently
in the compilation stage, she said.
They were gathered through the
distribution of questionnaires' to'
adults and youth in the area.
Represented at the regional con-
ference will be Washtenaw, Jack-
son, Hillsdale, Lenawee and Mon-
roe counties.
Costs for the all-day conference
will include registration and lunch-
eon fees.
Chapter Asks
For Clothing

The local chapter of !the Foster
Parents Plan, Inc. is sponsoring a"
drive for clothing to be distribut-
ed overseas, Mrs. William Alston,
a member of the group, an-
nounced yesterday.
The group, which will be col-
lecting clean, usable clothing at
three stations until Monday, is.
planning to ship the articles over-
seas where social, workers will
give them to anyone who needs
them, she said. They are not spe-
cifically for orphans or foster
children, she added.
The Kappa Alpha Theta house
has been designated as one of the
points for collection, with the oth-
er two in the homes of' Mrs.
Claude Lowry and Mrs. Robert
Juvinall.
Anyone wishing more, informa-
tion concerning the drive may
contact Mrs. Juvinall or Mrs, Wil-
liam Willcox..

"They became more activity
conscious after the move. The at-
mosphere from the highest stu-
dent organizations down and from
the housing units up was more in-
clined toward activities. Projects
got bigger-Michigras has gotten
bigger as has Spring Weekend -
whenever we do anything now, it
is on a much bigger scale.
Sororities Included
"The sorority system has been
as much a part of this as any-
thing." She then noted the failure
of the sororities to get down to the
real meaning of their functions.
These she defined as the sorority
acting as a basic unit for the pro-
motion of sound scholarship,
meaningful friendships, basic loy-
alties and a general balancing of
values.
She implied that the education-
al function of the sororities has
been put out of focus due to the
unbalanced emphasis on activi-
ties.
"I have seen Panhellenic, as an
organization, come into its own.
It has been tested from the out-
side with Sigma Kappa in 1956
and with spring rush." As a re-
sult, "the 'direction of thinking
and policy of Panhellenic has be-
come more diverse."
Notes Outside Pressures 1
Miss Tower noted that when she
took office she knew that this
would be another year of terrific
pressure from the outside. She felt,
that Panhellenic had grown in
strength and support from within
and that, as a. member of Studenta
Government Council, she always
had reference to it as a strong sys-
tem.
Concerning the decision made
by SGC on spring rush, she said,1
"I feel that Panhellenic, assuch,
was not really defeated, and per-
haps the decision !about Spring
rush, while not of benefit on cer-
tain mechanical grounds, will sup-
ply the motivation for looking at
the system internally, not' as a
part of SGC." She feels that then
the direction and thinking of the
sorority system will get back into
focus.
Miss Tower then discussed Pan-
hellenic's function, of late, as be-
ing in charge of coordinating ("I
hate the word") the sorority sys-
tem. "The direction of coordina-
tion has been up from the houses
and out through Panhellenic. Now
Panhellenic must supply the lead-
ership for an overall effectiveness
of the system," to bring back the
correct emphasis on the function;
of each sorority as a housing unit.
Scholarship 'Kick'
"Every time I give a swan song
I seem toget on the kick of schol-
arship. This is something which
really concerns .me because I'm
not quite sure if people are think-
ing of scholarship as a means or
as an end. I'm not sure whether
they are even thinking of it."
This interest is reflected in her
initial aim this year as president
HuIlaBaLUE 'U'
To Issue Student
I D'Tags Today
Officials for HulaBaLUE Uni-
versity will' issue student identi-
fication tags today in the League
Undergraduate office.
All Blue Team members are re-
minded that students of HullaBa-
LUE 'U' are required to have these
ID's for admission to the BaLUE
Ball and other campus meeting
places.
A floor show preview will b'e
given at 8:30 p.m. tonight in the
League Ballroom for all Blue
Team members and officials of
HullaBaLUE.

A pep rally, complete with a
Block H section, and visiting
Michigan cheerleaders, will be
held at 1 p.m. .tomorrow on the
diag. By special arrangement the
mock administration will feature
BaLUE (blue) popsicles.
COEDS'
Our flattering, casual,
easy-to-do hairstyles
for summer will enhance
YOU!
No appointments needed.
The Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

--Daily-Fred Shippey
OFFICE GIRL--Mary Tower, outgoing president of Panhellenic
Association, - discusses the evolution of Panhel, noting a general
expansion in campus activities. Looking for a more meaningful
function of sororities, she stresses a balancing of values as a means

By NORMA SUE WOLFE
Lectures, tours, exhibits, experi-
ments and a North Campus open
house will highlight Engineers'
Weekend, to be held tomorrow
thru Saturday.
"The Weekend, as a whole, is
directed toward the layman in
hopes of informing him of the
academic side of engineering,"
Charles R. Hildebrandt, '59E, pub-
licity chairman, said.
In addition, the annual open
house is aimed at the high school
student. The Engineering Council
feels that the student will have a
much better idea of the engineer-
ing profession if he has the op-
portunity to review it from its
academic start in college through
to its industrial completion, he
added.-
To 'Give Lecture
Initiating the weekend will be
Prof. Robert W. Pidd of the phys-
ics department and Prof. Kenneth
Boulding of the economics depart-
ment in a combined lecture titled
"Implications of the Space Age on
Our Society."
The lecture will be presented at
7:30 p.m. tomorrow, in the Multi-
Purpose Rm. of the Undergradu-
ate Library. It is open to the pub-
lic.
From 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. tomorrow
and Friday, elections of officers
for the classes of 1961 and 1962
will be held at the Engineering
Arch.
To Display Exhibits
Beginning at 1 p.m. tomorrow,
exhibit areas will be open for pub-
lic inspection in the East and West
Engrg. Bldg. A total of 42 student
displays and industrial exhibits
can be viewed until 5 p.m.
"The World of Sound," a hi-fi
demonstration, will be presented
from 2-3 p.m. tomorrow in Rm.
229 of West Engrg. Bldg. The
demonstration will continue Fri-
day and Saturday.
Exhibit areas will be open from
9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday. At 3:15
that afternoon, Prof. A. D. Moore
of the electrical engineering de-
partment, will compare "The En-
gineer of Today" with those of the
past and future.
At 10:30 a.m. Saturday, fresh-
men and sophomore engineers will
be engaged 'in a "tug o' war" at
Island Park on the Huron River.

Laboratories of North Campus
will open their doors from 1:30-
4:30 p.m. Saturday for public in-
spection. Movies of research work
being done, experiments and ex-
hibits will be shown in the auto-
motive, aeronautical, fluids and
Phoenix Project laboratories.
Free parking for drivers and bus
service will be provided. Buses will!
depart from the Engine Arch at
1:15, 1:45 and 2:15 p.m. Saturday.
They will leave from Cooley Bldg.
on North Campus and return to
the Arch at 3:15, 3:45 and 4:15
p.m.
The purpose of Engineers'
Weekend is to promote a better
understanding of the work of en-
gineers, Hildebrandt said.
The last day of ;the weekend,
Saturday, is concurrent with Uni-
versity Day, sponsored by the
Michigan Union.
Maize Team
To Present
Final Skits
Maize-A-Me will go on the Diag
for the last time at 12:45 p.m. to-
day.
The publicity committee, parad-
ing on bicycles through the en-
gineering arch, will arrive on the
left bank of the general -iibrary
to stage a dance routine. This will
be a grand finale to all their other
presentations.
The engine arch has been offi-
cially proclaimed the Arc de Tri-
omphe; this architectural feat was
masterminded exclusively by the
Maize team publicity committee.
Maize - A - Me, still mysterious,
will not only appear on the Diag
but will fence it in. Penny Thewalt,
'62, co-publicity chairman, said.
In fact, posters have recently been
released that inform the campus,
"You Are Maize-A-Me!"
Today's skit will sum up every-
thing that Maize has done 'the last
few weeks in preparation for their
dance and floorshow, to be given
Saturday in the League Ballroom.
This week, the central commit-
tee will wear yellow sneakers and
big yellow bows tied under their
chins.

SECOND SEMESTER
EXAMINATION SCHEDULE
COLLEGE OF LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
HORACE H. RACKHAM SCHOOL OF GRADUATE STUDIES
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION
SCHOOL OF NATURAL RESOURCES
SCHOOL OF PUBLIC HEALTH
COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
COLLEGE OF PHARMACY
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
SCHOOL OF NURSING
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
May 29 to June 9,1959
For courses having both lectures and recitations the "'Time
of Class" is the time of the first lecture period of the week. For
courses having recitation only, the "Time of Class" is the time
of the first recitation period. Certain courses will be examined
at special periods as noted below the regular schedule.
Courses not included in either the regular schedule or the
special periods may use any examination period provided there
is no conflict or provided that, in case of a conflict, the conflict.
is resolved by the class which conflicts with the regular schedule.
Degree candidates having a scheduled examination on June
6, 8 and 9 will be given an examination at an earlier date. The
following schedule designates an evening time for each such
examination. The instructor may arrange with the student for
an alternate time, with notice to the scheduling committee.
EVENING SCHEDULE FOR DEGREE CANDIDATES
Regular Tues., June 9 Tues.; June 9 Sat., June 6
Exam Time 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M.
Special Fri., May 29 Sat., May 30 Mon., June 1
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Regular Sat., June 6 Mon., June 8 Mon., June 8
Exam Time 2-5 P.M. 9-12 A.M. 2-5 P.M.
Special Tues., June 2 Wed., June 3 Thurs., June 4
Period 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M. 7-10 P.M.
Each student should receive notification from his instructor
as to the time and place of his examination.

to this end.
to judge the value of the program
in terms of each member.
"I wanted sororities to keep out
of a lot of activities if the scholar-
ship was going to suffer. I failed
partly because of pressure from
outside issues and also because the
houses simply didn't feel the need
for change."
Advocates Change
Candidly, as usual, she noted
that she would like to see the
scholarship committee promote
more ideas basic to education
rather than -discuss mechanisms
for better grades.
As for her own education at the
University, she said, "There are a
lot of different ways of evaluating
your education; book learning,de-
velopment of interests, getting to
know people and getting to know
yourself better. It is easy to
rationalize for the last four at
the sacrifice of the first, but at the
end, the rationalization isn't as
strong."
A major in economics also work-
ing for her teacher's certificate,
she is looking into jobs in New
York' City for next year. She is
interested especially in a job
which might lead to a foreign as-
signment and is considering the
possibility of going abroad to find
a job.
Sees Diverse Interests
"My interests are so diverse
now. I would love to combine
economics and a certain amount
of poly sci with government."
Returning to her participation
in activities, she commented, "I
don't think I could have gotten
through any of these activities if.
I hadn't completely enjoyed the
people with whom I worked. I al-
ways anticipated the best in them,
but wasn't disappointed by less
than that.
"I enjoyed SGC in terms of
working with the people on it,"
she said. A basic concern of Miss
Tower 'is that of philosophies,
whether her own or that of her
organization.
"I often had cause to wonder if,
as a student government, the phil-

osophy of SGC wasn't composed of
18 different philosophies each
year.
Individual Philosophies
"This was evident when each
member, on the major issues, ex-
pressed his own well-thought-out
ideas from his own philosophy.
This is perhaps inherent in the
fact that it was none of these 18
who developed SGC as it is now."
Until last year there were mem-
bers on SGC who had been on the
Council when it originated. "When
these people left, the original sup-
port of SGC left. The Clarifica-
tion Committee in its changes will
provide a more unified support of
SC. As it puts its plans into ef-
fect, SOC will again grow from a
central core of support. They must
define one unified philosophy, de-
cide where they are going and
how theywant to go."
Finally, and typically, her "swan
song" as she turned her gavel over
to Mary Wellman, '6OEd., the new
Panhellenic president, at League
Installation Night, was, "I devel-
oped a philosophy and I only hope
that other people have the same
kind of guide for all that they do."
Announce
C hair.en
David C. Beste, '60E, has been
appointed Homecoming chair-
man and Harvey G. Lapides,
'60, has been named Michigras
general chairman for next year,
John Goodrich, '60, Union ex-
ecutive vice-president said.
Homecoming will be the end
of October and Beste will be in
charge of coordinating all the
activities and displays and over-
see the entire weekend.
Michigras is held every other
year alternating with Spring'
Weekend and it consists of a
parade, a carnival in Ferry
Field and booths in Yost Field
House.

REGULAR SCHEDULE

Time of Class *
(at 8
(at 9
(at 10
(at 11
MONDAY (at 12
(at 1
(at 2
(at 3
(at 8
(at'9
(at 10
(at 11
TUESDAY (at 12
tat I.
(at 2
(at 3

Time of Examination
Saturday, May 30!
Monday, June 1
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4y
Thursday, June 4f
Friday, June 5
Wednesday, June 3f
Tuesday, June 2
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3
Friday, June 5
Friday, 'June 5
Friday, May 29
Thursday, June 4

Heart's healed by electricity
Sounds fantastic? They're doing it in
hospitals right now! Learn of this
amazing discovery in this week's Star
Weekly. On sale all week. Look for
the BLUE COVER.
. LECTURE
"Implications of Space Age on Our Society"
Dr. K. A. BOULDING-Econ. Dept.
Dr. R. W. PIDD- Physics Dept.
7:30 . . . Thursday, May 7
Multipurpose Room Undergrad. Library

* Classes beginning on the half hour will be scheduled
preceding hour.
SPECIAL PERIODS
SCHOOL OF BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

Accounting 100, 101, 200, 201
Bus. Ad. 181
Finance 110, 210
Finance 112, 215
Marketing 216
Statistics 100, 200
Statistics 201

Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Tuesday, June 2
Friday, May 29
Monday, June 1
Saturday, May 30
Wednesday, June 3

7-:
7-:
7-1
7-:
7-2

at
10
10
10
10
10
10

9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5
the
2-5
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
2-5
2-5
9-12
2-5
9-12
255
9-12
2-5
9-12

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
Aer'o"4Friday, May 29
Chem. Met. 1 (Lee. A and B
only) Saturday, June 6
Chem. Met. 113 Tuesday, June
Chem. Met. 212 Monday, June 8
Chem. Met. 215 Monday, June 8
C.E. 22 Thursday, June 4
C.E. 52 Saturday, June 6
C.E.53 Saturday, June 6
Drawing 1, 22 Saturday, June 6
Drawing 2 (A) Tuesday, June 2
Drawing 2 (B) Monday, June 8
E.E. 5 Monday, June 8
E.M. 2 Saturday, June 6
M.E. 2 Tuesday, June 9
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS

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Botany 1
Botany .2, 122
Chemistry 1, 3, 4, 8, 14
Economics 71, 72, 173
Economics 51, 52, 53, 54, 91, 153
English 23 (A), 24 (A)
English 23 (B), 24 (B)
French 1, 2, 11, 12, 22, 31, 32,
61
German 1, 2, 11, 31, 32, 35, 36
Latin 22 w
Physics 54
Russian 1, 2.12. 32
Sociology 1
Sociology 60
Spanish 1, 2, 22, 31

Wednesday, June 3.
Friday, June 5.
Wednesday, June 3
Thursday, June 4
Friday, May 29
Saturday, May 30
Thursday, June 4
Saturday, June 6
Monday, June 8
Saturday, June 6
Wednesday, June. 3
Monday, Junie 8
Tuesday, June 9
Tiursday, June 4
Saturday, June 8,

SPECIAL INSTRUCTIONS

7-10 p.m.
2-5
9-12
2-5
2-5
2-5
2-5

9-12
9-12

Going to Europe this summer?
Order your SIMCA car at
NAYLOR MOTOR SALES NOW!

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Classification Committee. All cases of conflicts between
assigned examinationperiods must be reported for adjustment.
See instructions posted outside Room 441 W.E. between April 20
and May 1.
LITERATURE, SCIENCE AND THE ARTS
No date of examination may be changed without the consent
of the Committee on Examination Schedules.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC
Individual examinations will be given for all applied music
courses (individual instruction) elected for credit in any unit of
the University. For time and place of examinations, see bulletin
board of the School of Music,
COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
r..nrr~ rr~i ITCTT.TC ATNKSTNT rMA TTON . ..

14.95

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