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February 14, 1959 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U.S. Pushes IncreasedCooperation

Australian Constitution
Based on American Model

conference to study the problem of
coffee surpluses. Previously it had
said that problems of such basic
products were a matter for the
producing countries to handle.
Economic aid to Latin American
nations appears to be moving
along at an accelerated pace. Ar-
gentina received 329 million in
credits, most of it from the United
States government, to help stabil-
ize its currency and economy.
Supply Credits
These credits, announced Dec.'
29, came long aftersome Argen-
tines had isuggested such an aid
program. This suggestion first
came after the 1955 overthrow of
Juan Peron's dictatorship. The
nation was left in economic dis-
tress.
But if the Argentine aid came
late, it seemed to indicate a much
more aggressive policy of financial
cooperation toward Latin America.
The Argentine credit was seen
here as a symbol of what can be
done when both sides are agreed
on the basic issues, and how they
should be met, both in Washing-
ton and in the borrowing country.
Brazil is reported watching the
A r g e n t i n e plan eagerly. And
Chile's new ambassador to Wash-
ington, Walter Muller, has been
instructed to try for some similar
financial assistance.
Supply and Demand
The law of supply and demand
saved the Unted States from one
prolonged headache in Latin
American affairs. Peru, Mexico,
Bolivia and some other countries
were almost outraged at United
States restrictions imposed Sept.
22 on imports of lead and zinc.
But even as some of the countries
protested, the market began to
improve and at the end of the
year Mexico reportedly got more
money for smaller shipments of
the two metals than it would have
at prices prevailing when Wash-
ington was deploring the need for
its restrictions.
A program for sharper curtail-
ment of oil imports continues to
be an irritant in Venezuela.
As 1959 begins, Washington is
pushing for increased. resources
for the World Bank and for the
International Monetary Fund, co-
operating actively in a conference
here to establish the Latin Ameri-
can Development Bank and talk-
ing of increasing government and
private help for under developed
areas in this hemisphere.
DAILY
OFFICIAL
BULLETIN
The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of The Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no edi-
torial responsibility. Notices should
be sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Build-
ing, before 2 p.m. the day preceding
publication. Notices for Sunday
Daily due at 2:00 p.m. Friday.
SAT RDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1959
VOL. LXIX, No. 93
Lectures
University Lectures in Journalism:
Paul Block, Jr., publisher of theToledo
Blade, will lecture on Tues., Feb. 17,
3 p.m. in the Rackham Amphitheatre.
His topic: "The Problem of Newspaper
Monopoly."
Robert Le Ricolais, noted French
structural engineer, will present an i-
lustrated lecture on Mon., Feb. 16, at
3:30 p.m. in the Architecture Aud.
Sponsored by the Dept. of Architecture;
students, faculty and the public are
invited.

Constitution as a guide. Thus it
was inevitable that in the present
supreme law, there are many
similarities to the Constitution of
the United States.
The Australian Constitution dif-
fers from that of the United States
in one principal way. The found-
ing fathers of the "country down
under" didn't believe that a Bill
of Rights was necessary. However
certain of the guarantees found in
our first ten amendments can also
be detected in Australia's Consti-
tution.
Little Change
Cowen said that "the Constitu-
tion has been largely impervious
to change." Since 1901, the coun-
try has approved only four amend-
ments to the Constitution. How-
ever, many judicial changes have
altered the original document.
The Central Government has in-
creased in power decidely since the
end of World War IL Consequently
there has been a noted weakening
in States Rights. "The Growth of
Central Power has been the result
of judicial interpretation and con-
struction of the Constitution,"
Cowen commented.
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DEAN ZELMAN COWEN
... discusses constitution

By DAVID BLOOMGARDEN
The Dean of the University of
Melbourne Law School said yester-
day the Australian Constitution
was fashioned to a certain extent
after its American counterpart.
After being constructed and ap-
proved by the people of Australia,
it was sent to the United Kingdom
where it was passed by the English
Parliament. Thus on January 1,
1901, the Federation of Australia
came into being after existing as
;six separate states within the
framework of the British Com-
monwealth, Dean Zelman Cowen
said.
Similar to U.S. Law
In fashioning the state, the Aus-
tralians looked to the American

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HALLMARK

CONTEMPORARY CARDS

(Continued on Page 4)
D ANSWER'THESE.QUESTION
Do Youl ink 07 Yurtself0.4 AND YOULL FIND OUT!"

t ^
04

1. If you get stuck on a crossword puzzle,
do you (A) finally refer to a dictionary,
or (B) leave the puzzle unfinished?
2. Would you rather be (A) the designer of
the first successful space vehicle to the
moon, or (B) the first man to ride in it?
3. If you were faced with two tasks, one
pleasant and the other unpleasant,
would you first do (A) the unpleasant
task, or (B) the pleasant task?

A Li e i.,.

A eD
AFT D
.o eD

'6
- 8.

Would you prefer to play tennis with A ie j
an opponent you know to be (A) not AU
quite so good as you, or (B) a
slightly better player?
In deciding whether to see a movie,
are you more influenced by (A) what A B
a casual friend tells you about it, or
(B) what you know of the cast and story?
If you were a multimillionaire, would A r
you rather have (A) everyone know it,
or (B) only a very few know it?

1

4. If you find you aren't doing well in
an activity, do you (A) concentrate
on it to improve your performance, or
(B) devote your attention to things in
which you do excel?

Do you take more notice of someone's
(A) good looks, or (B) good manners?
fa
act

AE 8

9. When making your choice
filter cigarette, do you (A
on the basis of what som
tells you, or (B) think it
,., through for yourself?

e o
L)

Bone

,

,.:. If you're the kind of person who thinks for
iyourself. . you use judgment in your
choice of cigarettes, as in everything else.
t.".Men and women who think for themselves

..b

lw-%%

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