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February 14, 1959 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1959-02-14

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY ~ATTJRDAV. FERRITARY 14

Math, Anthropology
Honors Expanded
(Continued from Page 1)

'Cat on a Hot Tin Roof'

Kidd Asks Daring
For Original Poetri0

"We do not believe in giving the
students projiects to do," he add-
ed. The students are not advanced
enough in mathematics to do re-
search on a profesisonal level' The
projects they are able to do are
either trivial or have been done
by others before them," he con-
As seniors the honors students
take graduate courses on a begin-
ner's level. Juniors take senior
courses, Prof. McLaughlin said. rt
is possible for students to attend
graduate seminars but it would be
pointless to attend them for cred-
it because then they would have
more than the required 40 hours
in mathematics.
Expands Program
The anthropology departiment
plans on expanding its program.
This is the first semester that
juniors may enter the program,"
Prof. Titiev said.
It is a three semester course
because the department must first
meet the juniors as concentrates.
Thus they will not know a stu-
dexit's capacity until the end of
the first semester of the junior
year.
In the second semester of the
jior yeoar th honorsdestudents
people of different cultures. In the
first semester of the senior year
they read original works in dif-
ferent branches of anthropology.
In this semester the students go
String Music
To Be Played
The Societa Corelli will appear
in the second concert of the Uni-
versity's Chamber Music Festival
at 8:30 p.m. today in Rackham
Auditorium.

to the basic field reports instead
of the normal summary," tProf.
Titiev said.
The students meet three times a
week for an hour in the junior
year and first semester of the
senior year, he added.
Write Research Papers
In the second semester of the
senior year each student writes a
research paper. The students meet
in a group and review their find-
ings so that each one can get a
better knowledge of the different
f ids of anthropology, Prof.
I'tev said.
Aside from seigethe students
student at least once every two
weeks to Inquire about his progress
on the paper. "We continue to
guide them but most of the work
is done on an Individual basis
rather than the group basis that
was done during the 'first two se-
mesters of the program," he con-
tinued.
"If the mathematics depart-
ment gets more money, we initend
to extend our program and give
courses in both the junior and
senior year," Prof. McLaughlin
,said.

-Daily-David Arnold
"NO-NECK MONSTERS"-Big Daddy, played by Prof. Henry
Owens, of Eastern Michigan College, winces as he is confronted
by Sister Women, her husband and their children, whom Big
Daddy calls no-neck monsters, while Maggie the Cat, played by
Estelle Ginn, looks on with resignation, The action takes place
during the play, "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," currently being pre--
sented by the Ann Arbor Civic Theatre.

U' Platform Attractions
To Present Travelogues

University Platform Attractions
wil presnt isannual series of
Burton Holmes Travelogues on
five successive Thursday nights,
beginning next week.
Ted Phillis and narrated by Rob-
ert Mallett will be shown Thurs-
day. The travelogue shows a jour-:.
ney through the country, covering
the busy river traffic, quaint vil-

EAGUE SNACK BARet e
Food - Dancing - Entertainment
Atmosphere -- Free Admission
9-12 Saturday Night

MAKE *25! START TALKING OUR LANGUAGE!

les and famous castles oth
Rhine and visits to festivals and
fairs.
The invenltiveness and technical
skill of the German people will be
illustrated, by picture visits to
farm and factory, while Ger-
miany's contribution to the world
of music, literature and educa-
tion will be conveyed through
tours of its museums and univer-
sities.
On March 5, a travelogue will
cover "The Golden West," nar-
rated and produced, by Thayer
Soule. Through the Black Hills of
Dakota to the state of Wyoming,
the film will cover such scenic
wonders as Yellowstone National
Park.
The Grand Tetons, the Big
Horn Country, Glacier-Park, Sun
Valley and a stop in Cheyenne to
view the famous "Frontier Days"'
festival will be shown. A high-
light of the film is a hike along
the Great Divide to Granite Park
Chalet on the roof of the Rockies.
Holland, land of windmills, ca-
nals and a profusion of flowers,
will be presented' March 12 by
Mallett. The film visits Rotter-
dam, the second largest harbor
center; Delft, famous for its blue-
patterned dishes and pottery and
Akmaar, the "City of the Cheese
Market."6416
ENDING TODAY
Continuous Today from I P.M
- -*
* UNDAY ~
Another Greet Suspense Film
"A MAN ESCA PE D"

IN DE TR OIT:
Duble .Bill
Of Plays Set
For Wayne
Wayne State University Theatre
will continue its current drama
season at 8:30 p.m. today, pre-
senting Arthur Miller's "A View
from1 the Bridge."
Additional performances of the
production, which consists of two
one-act plays, "A Memory of Two
Mondays" and "A View from the
Bridge," will be given today and
on Feb. 19 and 20.
There will be a special perform-
ance Feb. 17, sponsored by the
League of Women Votprs.
"A Memory of Two Mondays," is
considered a realistic allegory. In
it Miller demonstrates the paths
which people take in this world,
their search for meaning. and the
frustrations arising from their
mortal deeds and disappointing
achievements through a group of
people working In a warehouse.
"A View from the Bridge," remni-
niscent of a Greek tragedy in its
sense of fate and the direct march
to catastrophe, is the story of the
way man in the modern world
naively dhooses a course of action
which destroys him.
The two plays, first produced in
New York in 1955, were created
leg roawa'ssupiio f" th
one-act play and to demonstrate
his own faith in the power of the
short drama.

By FAITH WEINSTEIN
"The poet should dare, wisely,
in order to gain a greater degree
of originality," Walter Kidd, visit-
inglecturer in English, said yes-
tray.
hWaltr Kidd, himself isape
with words. He calls himself an
organic symbolist,"? that is, one
whose symbolism is "drawn from
the very substance of life."'
His symbolism Is presented al-
ways, In the most effective lan-
guage which he can find, or cre-
ate. He has turned literary ref er-
ences into npuns and verbs for ar-
tistic purposes.
"When a poet considers that he
can give a more intense and color-
ful concreteness to his, expression
he has the artistic right to frac-
ture words into new meanings,"
Kidd said. lie has "fractured"
such names. as Ophelia, and Is-
cariot, into common nouns and
verbs which he thinks carry great-
er connotative power than an or-
dinary word could convey.
Uses Visual Patterns
Besides the use of connotation,
for greater power, Kidd has also
employed the technique of what
he calls "typographical eccentri-
cities," the use of deliberate place-
ment of words across a page so as
to form a visual pattern signifi-
cant to the meaning of the poem.
He said poetry today has lost
the appeal to the ear whiqh char-
acterized it during the 17th and
18th centuries. Consequently, he
explained, the poet must supple-
ment the audible quality of a
poem with a visual image, which
he provides by the use of the tech-
niqu of typgrph'ica imagry
Thus the yword image ofg hi
"closecrumblingwater" Is height-
ened by the fusion of the words
Into a single pattern.
Much of1 this idea of visual im-
agery has come frpm e. e. cum4
mings, who, Kidd said,. has jus'ed
great artistry with this form, but
who, upon occasion, goes so far
into the connotative as to lose
the denotative significance of the
words.
Poetry Published
As Conrad Pendleton, Kidd has
published one volume of poetry,
"Slow Fire of Time" which is a
collection of poems which he has
written over a number of years.
As with individual poems the title
of the collection serves as a
"thematic symbol" for the whole,
according to the poet, who said
his title symbbl is usually carried
throughout the entire poem.
Kidd described the "slow fire
of time" symbol as meaning that
power inherent in life, which
slowly destroys everything which

Ann Arbor firemen rescued tour
children from their blazing homie
at~ 1252 S. State St. on Feb. 5.
The children were~ identified as
Terry, Gary, Pamela and Pris-
cilla Hurst. Robert 0. Hurst, the
father, is superintendent of
grounds at Ferry Field.
Fireman Eugene Zulz, wearing
no smoke mask, found Gary, 0,
and Terry, 3, unconscIous in a
smoke-filled upstairs bedroom.
Pamela, 10, and PriscIlla, 7,
jumped ifrom a bedroom in the
opjosite' end of the house and
were caught by Fire Capt. Emer-
son F. Ehnis and Fireman Rich-
ard K. Hartman.

man has built up. However, he
does not 'consider this a pessimis-
tic theory.
Influened~ by Frost
Robert. Frost has been a great
influence on his writing, KIdd
said, both directly and indirectly.
The Influence of the New England
way of life, which Frost represents,
was transportedunby the pioner
Oregon where he was born, Kidd
said.
Throuh hi reerh onFrost,
including his Master of rts the-
sis on ''The H{umanlsm and Classi-
cism of Frost" KIdd has been in-
fluenced by the New England poet
very directly.
One of the things whlch -Kidd
appreciates most about the Uni-
versity ls the library with its over
two million volumes, which will
allow him to continue his research
on Frost.
Tauht~ ' Collee
Kidd has taught at many unb-
versities and colleges in the mid-
west and far west, Before Coming
to the University as a visiting lec-
turer In English, he was 111 charge
of the writing program at Presno
State College, C~alifornia.
Born Into a family of trn'lhers
an d cattlemen, Kidd wus dls-
cour aged from writing during his
childhood. "I was doing the un-
forgivable," he said. He continued
towiehowever took hi- bache-
lor's and master's degrees at the
University of Oregon at Portland,
and his doctorate at the Univer-
sity of Iowa..
Along with his family history,
on the ranch in the blue moun-.
tains, he also has famous rela-
tives, among them George Eliot,
Midhael KIdd and the choreog-
rapher.
Four Saved

From Fire

DON'T MISS the ALL

CAMPUS VALENTINE DANCE

Organization
Noties8

I

TONIGHT . . . 9-12 P.M.
UNION BALLROOM
BLASER JOHNSON ORCHESTRA

I

Send yours to Lucky Strike, Box 67A, Mount
Vernon, New York. Enclose your name, address,
college or university, and class.

English MAL SELSEnglish: WOOING TECHNIQU
ThI~4&~ ~4~YT~ ~inJ~h HART*T
LYN~r D eOQ.U FN.CRLJ RUCE 4TZAK. CASE INSTITUTE OF TECH,
English: WATERFOWL FORMATION
2 A
. RO6ER JENNINGS. U. OF CAL.
Englsh: MAN WHO CONDUCTS
POPULARITY SURVEYS
Thkeklish translation: This fellow knows more about 'polls than a telephone
lineman. When someone starts, "Hail, hail, the gang's all here!"- he counts
noses to make sure. If he canvassed women, he'd be a galculator. If he
unte n pr'mg nf niwsonhd ha a ot.n~rltn, A phi llu ha phopozr nn

English: TALKING INSECT
rjmlhsh ELLMN NCHT SYRACUSe
Englsh MIDNIGHT SNACKER
ARRrET DOYL MARYLAND

(Use of this column for an-
nouncements is available to offi-
cially recognized and registered or-
ganizations only. Organizations
planning to be active for this
semester must register by February
28. FormsB aalable, 2011 Student
Mich. Christian Fellowship, Feb. 15,
4 p.m., Lane Hall. Speakter: Dr. Edwin
Palmer, "Who Is This Christ?
Ue. of M. Jud Club, practice session,
Uni. Christian Fderation, "Life an
Fe b 1 4 1 2 noon , n ne a ll
Young Frien d meetingFe 15 7:3
Newman Club, Communion Breakfast,
Speaker: Rev Fr onM netrreicher,
"The Encouragement of Understanding
Between Christians and Jews.

£

....

'U

DOOR PRIZES -FLOOR SHOW
only $1.50 per couple

TONIGH 1T PM
ALL iTS SWEEP!
Maverick'
ian amazin
role as a
"human torpedo"
E DM OND

Ton igh t at ~7 and 9 P.M.
Sunday 8 P.M.
with
OLIVIA deHAVILLAND MARK STEVENS
CELESTE HOLM
SHORT: Keeping in Shape, with Robert Benchie
ARCH ITECTURE AUDITORIUM
50 cents

U

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